History

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  • Chicago’s Deadliest Day, 100 Years Ago

    History in the Headlines
    Christopher Klein
    24 Jul 2015 | 7:48 am
    S.S. Eastland lying on its side after capsizing. (Credit Chicago Tribune historical photo/TNS via Getty Images)   S.S. Eastland Even the falling drizzle couldn’t dampen the soaring spirits of the crowd who gathered on the banks of the Chicago River on July 24, 1915. Employees of the Western Electric Company, the country’s only telephone manufacturer, savored a rare Saturday off and looked forward to a day of fun with family and friends at the company’s annual summer excursion to Michigan City, Indiana. Not wanting to miss a single enjoyable moment, passengers with picnic baskets…
  • 7 Things You May Not Know About Vincent Van Gogh

    History in the Headlines
    enix
    29 Jul 2015 | 6:43 am
    An 1887 van Gogh self-portrait (Credit: Art Institute of Chicago/Wikimedia Commons) 1. He failed at multiple jobs before becoming an artist. The son of a minister, van Gogh started working at age 16, when his uncle got him a job as a trainee with an art dealership in The Hague. He went on to do stints in the firm’s London and Paris offices before he was fired in 1876. Afterward, he worked briefly as a schoolteacher in England then at a bookstore back in the Netherlands. In 1878, he went to the Borinage, a mining district in Belgium, and worked among the poor as a lay preacher. He gave away…
  • Combating book theft in medieval times

    Mirabilis.ca
    Mirabilis
    26 Jul 2015 | 11:22 am
    From medievalbooks.nl: Chain, Chest, Curse: Combating Book Theft in Medieval Times. Considering these two practical theft-prevention techniques – chaining your books to something unmovable or putting them into a safe – the third seems kind of odd: to write a curse against book thieves inside the book. Your typical curse (or anathema) simply stated that the thief would be cursed, like this one in a book from an unidentified Church of St Caecilia: “Whoever takes this book or steals it or in some evil way removes it from the Church of St Caecilia, may he be damned and cursed forever,…
  • Monday 28 July 1662

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys
    Samuel Pepys
    28 Jul 2015 | 5:59 pm
    Up early, and by six o’clock, after my wife was ready, I walked with her to the George, at Holborn Conduit, where the coach stood ready to carry her and her maid to Bugden, but that not being ready, my brother Tom staid with them to see them gone, and so I took a troubled though willing goodbye, because of the bad condition of my house to have a family in it. So I took leave of her and walked to the waterside, and there took boat for the Tower; hearing that the Queen-Mother is come this morning already as high as Woolwich: and that my Lord Sandwich was with her; at which my heart was…
  • Mars 96 orbiter triggered Hollywood-style panic in Queensland: Rob Borbidge

    History in the News
    28 Jul 2015 | 6:45 pm
    President Bill Clinton issued a private warning in 1996 that an out-of-control Russian satellite was going to impact south east Queensland and it "could have been very nasty". A radioactive spacecraft thought to be on a collision course with Queensland sparked an emergency response stretching from Brisbane to Washington in 1996.
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    History in the Headlines

  • 7 Things You May Not Know About Vincent Van Gogh

    enix
    29 Jul 2015 | 6:43 am
    An 1887 van Gogh self-portrait (Credit: Art Institute of Chicago/Wikimedia Commons) 1. He failed at multiple jobs before becoming an artist. The son of a minister, van Gogh started working at age 16, when his uncle got him a job as a trainee with an art dealership in The Hague. He went on to do stints in the firm’s London and Paris offices before he was fired in 1876. Afterward, he worked briefly as a schoolteacher in England then at a bookstore back in the Netherlands. In 1878, he went to the Borinage, a mining district in Belgium, and worked among the poor as a lay preacher. He gave away…
  • Peru Plans First Contact with Isolated Amazonian Tribe

    Sarah Pruitt
    27 Jul 2015 | 11:52 am
    A 2011 photo of members of the Mashco Piro tribe. (Credit: Reuters) Experts consider the phrase “uncontacted” to be somewhat inaccurate, as all of the world’s communities have some degree of awareness of their neighbors, as well as a sense of the world that exists outside their homes. Today, about 50 isolated indigenous communities remain across lowland South America, all of which have had limited to no contact with the outside world. Anthropologists stress that while members of such tribes may want to make contact with the outside world, they have chosen not to do so largely because of…
  • Chicago’s Deadliest Day, 100 Years Ago

    Christopher Klein
    24 Jul 2015 | 7:48 am
    S.S. Eastland lying on its side after capsizing. (Credit Chicago Tribune historical photo/TNS via Getty Images)   S.S. Eastland Even the falling drizzle couldn’t dampen the soaring spirits of the crowd who gathered on the banks of the Chicago River on July 24, 1915. Employees of the Western Electric Company, the country’s only telephone manufacturer, savored a rare Saturday off and looked forward to a day of fun with family and friends at the company’s annual summer excursion to Michigan City, Indiana. Not wanting to miss a single enjoyable moment, passengers with picnic baskets…
  • The Day Dylan Went Electric

    Evan Andrews
    24 Jul 2015 | 6:50 am
    Bob Dylan at a 1965 press conference. (Credit: Michael Ochs Archive/Getty Images) By the summer of 1965, there were signs that Bob Dylan had entered a new phase of his career. The wild-haired troubadour had traded his everyman garb for sunglasses, trendy suit jackets and pointy-toed boots, and he was beginning to distance himself from his reputation as a protest singer and folk balladeer. Just five days before the Newport Folk Festival, he released “Like a Rolling Stone,” a six-minute-long single that combined stream-of-consciousness lyrics with electric guitar and catchy organ riffs. The…
  • 10 Things You May Not Know About Ulysses S. Grant

    Evan Andrews
    23 Jul 2015 | 7:24 am
    1. The “S” in Grant’s name didn’t stand for anything. Although he was always known as “Ulysses” during his youth in Ohio, Grant’s given name was actually Hiram Ulysses Grant. His phantom middle initial is the result of an error from Ohio Congressman Thomas Hamer, who accidentally wrote the future general’s name as “Ulysses S. Grant” when he nominated him to attend West Point. Despite Grant’s best efforts to correct the record, the name stuck, and he eventually accepted it as his own. “Find some name beginning with “S” for me,” he joked in an 1844 letter to his…
 
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    Mirabilis.ca

  • Combating book theft in medieval times

    Mirabilis
    26 Jul 2015 | 11:22 am
    From medievalbooks.nl: Chain, Chest, Curse: Combating Book Theft in Medieval Times. Considering these two practical theft-prevention techniques – chaining your books to something unmovable or putting them into a safe – the third seems kind of odd: to write a curse against book thieves inside the book. Your typical curse (or anathema) simply stated that the thief would be cursed, like this one in a book from an unidentified Church of St Caecilia: “Whoever takes this book or steals it or in some evil way removes it from the Church of St Caecilia, may he be damned and cursed forever,…
  • Easy DNA editing will remake the world

    Mirabilis
    26 Jul 2015 | 11:10 am
    From Wired: Easy DNA Editing Will Remake the World. Buckle Up. Using the three-year-old technique, researchers have already reversed mutations that cause blindness, stopped cancer cells from multiplying, and made cells impervious to the virus that causes AIDS. Agronomists have rendered wheat invulnerable to killer fungi like powdery mildew, hinting at engineered staple crops that can feed a population of 9 billion on an ever-warmer planet. Bioengineers have used Crispr to alter the DNA of yeast so that it consumes plant matter and excretes ethanol, promising an end to reliance on…
  • Do the world’s ‘uncontacted’ tribes deserve to be left alone?

    Mirabilis
    26 Jul 2015 | 9:40 am
    From the Washington Post: Do the world’s ‘uncontacted’ tribes deserve to be left alone? For the first time, anthropologists working for the Peruvian government will attempt to make contact with members of a remote tribe living in the Amazon jungle. The move follows growing concerns about the behavior of the Mascho Piro people, which has included attacks and raids on neighboring communities. South America, and in particular the vast Amazon region, is home to some of the world’s last remaining “uncontacted” tribes — indigenous communities that, for whatever reason,…
  • Leif Haugen, Fire Lookout

    Mirabilis
    23 Jul 2015 | 9:00 pm
    From americanforests.org: Leif Haugen, Fire Lookout. The old tent creaks and buckles under the force of the fierce wind blowing from the west as I sleep. The tall windows of the nearby fire lookout tower rattle and shake. The sun sets behind a distant peak, clouds roll in and the clear blue sky slowly turns to the burnt orange of dusk. It took the better part of a day’s travel to get to the top of this mountain. The journey began at a small town on a gravel road. With only a general store, a handful of houses, a seasonal restaurant and a hostel, it is really more like an outpost than a…
  • Bathing machines

    Mirabilis
    22 Jul 2015 | 9:59 am
    Whizzpast.com’s post,Victorian Beach Life: Photos of 19th Century Bathing Machines in Operation, is good fun. The gist of the blessing bathing machines brought life in the budding modern industrial era is fairly simple. The passenger enters a horse or human drawn carriage, which is transported some distance out into the water. The van’s human cargo changes into whatever shapeless sack was deemed suitable at the time. [continue] There are lots of photos.
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    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Monday 28 July 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    28 Jul 2015 | 5:59 pm
    Up early, and by six o’clock, after my wife was ready, I walked with her to the George, at Holborn Conduit, where the coach stood ready to carry her and her maid to Bugden, but that not being ready, my brother Tom staid with them to see them gone, and so I took a troubled though willing goodbye, because of the bad condition of my house to have a family in it. So I took leave of her and walked to the waterside, and there took boat for the Tower; hearing that the Queen-Mother is come this morning already as high as Woolwich: and that my Lord Sandwich was with her; at which my heart was…
  • Sunday 27 July 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:59 pm
    (Lord’s day). At church alone in the pew in the morning. In the afternoon by water I carried my wife to Westminster, where she went to take leave of her father, and I to walk in the Park, which is now every day more and more pleasant, by the new works upon it. Here meeting with Laud Crispe, I took him to the farther end, and sat under a tree in a corner, and there sung some songs, he singing well, but no skill, and so would sing false sometimes. Then took leave of him, and found my wife at my Lord’s lodging, and so took her home by water, and to supper in Sir W. Pen’s…
  • Saturday 26 July 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    26 Jul 2015 | 5:59 pm
    Sir W. Batten, Mr. Pett, and I at the office sitting all the morning. So dined at home, and then to my office again, causing the model hanging in my chamber to be taken down and hung up in my office, for fear of being spoilt by the workmen, and for my own convenience of studying it. This afternoon I had a letter from Mr. Creed, who hath escaped narrowly in the King’s yacht, and got safe to the Downs after the late storm; and that there the King do tell him, that he is sure that my Lord is landed at Callis safe, of which being glad, I sent news thereof to my Lord Crew, and by the post to…
  • Friday 25 July 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    25 Jul 2015 | 5:59 pm
    At the office all the morning, reading Mr. Holland’s discourse of the Navy, lent me by Mr. Turner, and am much pleased with them, they hitting the very diseases of the Navy, which we are troubled with now-a-days. I shall bestow writing of them over and much reading thereof. This morning Sir W. Batten came in to the office and desired to speak with me; he began by telling me that he observed a strangeness between him and me of late, and would know the reason of it, telling me he heard that I was offended with merchants coming to his house and making contracts there. I did tell him that…
  • Thursday 24 July 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    24 Jul 2015 | 5:59 pm
    Up early this morning sending the things to the carrier’s, and my boy, who goes to-day, though his mistress do not till next Monday. All the morning at the office, Sir W. Batten being come to town last night. I hear, to my great content, that my Lord Sandwich is safe landed in France. Dined at our chamber, where W. Bowyer with us, and after much simple talk with him, I left him, and to my office, where all the afternoon busy till 9 at night, among other things improving my late experiment at Woolwich about hemp. So home and to bed. Read the annotations
 
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    History in the News

  • Mars 96 orbiter triggered Hollywood-style panic in Queensland: Rob Borbidge

    28 Jul 2015 | 6:45 pm
    President Bill Clinton issued a private warning in 1996 that an out-of-control Russian satellite was going to impact south east Queensland and it "could have been very nasty". A radioactive spacecraft thought to be on a collision course with Queensland sparked an emergency response stretching from Brisbane to Washington in 1996.
  • July 29: UNRWA cutbacks

    28 Jul 2015 | 3:41 pm
    Claims debate It is with a heavy heart that we feel compelled to address your recent coverage of the Claims Conference. We are both survivors of the Shoah, and one of us is a member of the Claims Conference board of directors.
  • Rapist who brutally attacked a 14-year-old girl at knifepoint as...

    28 Jul 2015 | 11:36 am
    PICTURED: The American dentist who killed Cecil, Africa's most famous lion, with a bow and arrow on $55,000 hunting trip Listen to the horrifying moment an airline pilot with just THREE minutes of fuel left is told he can't land in North Dakota because the airport is 'closed' 'I actually think I'm a pretty good president,' says Obama as he makes claim he would win a THIRD term if legally allowed to run again Nasa's 'impossible' fuel-free thrusters DO work: German scientists confirm viability of super-fast space travel that could slash a journey to the moon down to 4 HOURS EXCLUSIVE: 'Hillary…
  • Guided Tours of the Frances Perkins Homestead National Historic Landmark available in Newcastle

    28 Jul 2015 | 11:36 am
    The Frances Perkins Homestead, named a National Historic Landmark by Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell in 2014, is the ancestral home of Frances Perkins, U.S. Secretary of Labor under Franklin Delano Roosevelt from 1933-45. Perkins was the first woman to serve in a presidential cabinet and was the principal architect behind many of the New Deal policies undertaken to combat the Great Depression and improve the lives and working conditions for generations of Americans.
  • First Minnesota Infantry's epic action at Gettysburg

    28 Jul 2015 | 10:31 am
    The popular movie "Gettysburg" suggest that the 20th Maine and General Joshua Chamberlin saved the Union army at the Battle of Gettysburg . But perhaps instead it was the First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment.
 
 
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    History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

  • July 29, 1958: NASA created

    28 Jul 2015 | 9:00 pm
    On this day in 1958, the U.S. Congress passes legislation establishing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), a civilian agency responsible for coordinating America’s activities in space. NASA has since sponsored space expeditions, both human and mechanical, that have yielded vital information about the solar system and universe. It has also launched numerous earth-orbiting satellites that have been instrumental in everything from weather forecasting to navigation to global communications. NASA was created in response to the Soviet Union’s October 4, 1957 launch of its…
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    The New York History Blog

  • Marquis de Lafayette’s Visit To Fort Hunter

    Bob Cudmore
    28 Jul 2015 | 12:00 pm
    If you visit Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site in Fort Hunter, you will be following in the footsteps of Marquis de Lafayette, who visited by canal boat in 1825. A French aristocrat, Lafayette fought with George Washington’s army during the American Revolution. At some point while in America the Frenchman visited Johnstown and was entertained […]
  • Cayuga Museum Seeks Input On Food Exhibit

    Editorial Staff
    28 Jul 2015 | 10:00 am
    The Cayuga museum of History and Art, in Auburn, NY, is working on a new exhibit based on the story of food in their community. Breaking Bread: Food, Culture and What’s on Your Plate will explore the history, culture and politics of food, and celebrate the myriad ways food brings people together. Ranging from the […]
  • Exhibit Marks 50 Years Of Empire State Plaza

    Editorial Staff
    28 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    The New York State Museum has opened a new exhibition commemorating the 50th anniversary of the laying of the cornerstone for the Empire State Plaza that occurred on June 21,1965. The Empire State Plaza at 50 is organized in collaboration with the New York State Office of General Services and features dozens of images as […]
  • The State Historian and the Future of New York History

    Bruce Dearstyne
    27 Jul 2015 | 12:00 pm
    The position of New York State Historian was created in 1895. The Historian was appointed by the Governor until 1911, when the position was moved to the State Education Department. Since that time, it has been located in a number of offices including the Office of State History (1966-1976), and since then, in the State […]
  • Ella Frances Lynch: Adirondack Maven of Early Education

    Lawrence P. Gooley
    27 Jul 2015 | 9:08 am
    Beginning here is the story of an unknown but truly remarkable woman, an educator from Adirondack history. But first, some related information is helpful for perspective. For starters, here’s a sampling of complaints about our educational system: low graduation rates; undeserved diplomas; graduates lacking in real-world skills; students woefully unprepared for college; students without self-discipline, […]
 
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    Toptenz.net

  • 10 Interesting Facts About Unusual Fictional Pets

    Jessica Williams
    28 Jul 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Cats and dogs are great, but let’s be honest: the best pets are the ones you can’t find at the corner pet shop. The best pets are the kind that take a team of writers and animators to create. We’ve all wished Fido had crime fighting powers, wings to fly, the ability to change colors, […] The post 10 Interesting Facts About Unusual Fictional Pets appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Horribly Inept American Presidents

    Jeff Danelek
    27 Jul 2015 | 9:10 pm
    It takes a special person to become President of the United States. They must not only demonstrate leadership skills, decisiveness, and possess a bit of luck, but they also need the ability to keep from getting overwhelmed. As you’re about to find out, not everyone who’s called the White House home has had all of those […] The post 10 Horribly Inept American Presidents appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Famous Dogs Straight Out of Science Fiction

    Dean Cassady
    26 Jul 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Dogs have been companions to humans for centuries, but little do people know how some of them defied physics, contributed to extremely important scientific discoveries or simply – through the combination of nature and anomalies – stretched our sci-fi imaginations far beyond the limits of even Philip K. Dick. Here’s a rundown of some scientific, […] The post 10 Famous Dogs Straight Out of Science Fiction appeared first on Toptenz.net.
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    History Of Macedonia

  • Οι αγρότες της Μακεδονίας πριν από 5.500 χρόνια

    Stern
    28 Jul 2015 | 2:18 am
    Δυσανεξία στη λακτόζη είχαν οι κάτοικοι οικισμού της Εποχής του Χαλκού (2500 π.Χ.-1850 π.Χ.) στη θέση Ξεροπήγαδο στην Κοιλάδα Κοζάνης και ως εκ τούτου δεν μπορούσαν να πέψουν το γάλα. Επιπλέον είχαν καστανά μάτια και σκουρόχρωμη επιδερμίδα. Τα νέα δεδομένα έφερε στο φως η ανάλυση του DNA από σκελετικά κατάλοιπα που βρέθηκαν στο…
  • Αμφίπολη: Βραβείο αρχαιολογικής ανακάλυψης

    Stern
    23 Jul 2015 | 4:49 am
    Το «Διεθνές βραβείο αρχαιολογικής ανακάλυψης» της εκδήλωσης Μεσογειακού Αρχαιολογικού Τουρισμού, της μοναδικής Έκθεσης Αρχαιολογίας παγκοσμίως που εδράζει στο Capaccio – Paestum στην Ιταλία, θα δοθεί στην ανασκαφή της Αμφίπολης. Το πρώτο βραβείο (χρυσό μετάλλιο) θα απονεμηθεί σε τελετή η οποία θα γίνει στις 30 Οκτωβρίου στον…
  • Greek Ministry of Culture: Archaeological Excavations And Historical Facts about Philip II’s Tomb

    D-Mak
    22 Jul 2015 | 7:27 am
      It was recently published in the American journal ”Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)” a paleoanthropological study by Mr. A. Bartsiokas and Mr. Juan Luis Arsuaga , concerning bones that have been found in the cist tomb (Tomb I) of the Royal Burial Cluster, excavated in the ’70s by the late professor Manolis Andronikos in the Great […] Related posts: Macedonian tomb of Eordaia opens to the public. Ancient Macedonia – Experts question claim that Alexander the Great’s half-brother is buried at Vergina Ancient Macedonia – Philip II…
  • ΥΠΠΟ: Ανασκαφικά και ιστορικά δεδομένα για τον τάφο του Φιλίππου Β’

    Stern
    22 Jul 2015 | 5:46 am
    Ελεφαντοστέινο πορτρέτο του Φιλίππου Β’ Προσφάτως δημοσιεύτηκε στο αμερικανικό περιοδικό Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) μελέτη των παλαιοανθρωπολόγων Α. Μπαρτσιώκα και Juan Luis Arsuaga που αφορά σε οστά που βρέθηκαν στον κιβωτιόσχημο τάφο (τάφος Ι) της βασιλικής ταφικής συστάδας που ανασκάφηκε την δεκαετία του εβδομήντα από τον…
  • Φιλοσκοπιανό συνέδριο-«φιάσκο» στη Φλώρινα

    Stern
    21 Jul 2015 | 2:53 am
    Παναγιώτης Σαββίδης Αν και στόχος των διοργανωτών ήταν να αποδείξουν πως στη βόρεια Ελλάδα υπάρχει μειονότητα «Μακεντόνετς» που καταπιέζεται από τις Αρχές, εντούτοις η απουσία προσέλευσης κόσμου, διέψευσε για μία ακόμη φορά τους ανιστόρητους ισχυρισμούς τους Σε φιάσκο εξελίχθηκε το φιλοσκοπιανό συνέδριο που…
 
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    Claire Gebben

  • Abroad and at home

    clairegebben
    10 Jul 2015 | 9:33 am
    This May, I had the privilege of visiting the Archives Research Centre in Inverness, where I took a peak at Croy Parish Church registers. The Kirk, as it was known in those days. Unlike modern church sessions (at least, those of the mainline denominations with which I’m familiar), these Kirk sessions included provincial trials of misdeeds such as fist-fighting on the Sabbath. Here’s an excerpt from one such record: Croy July 13 1740 James Mitter Gardiner in [Cabrach] & Margaret Gordon in Mitten Delated for undecent correspondence are appointed to be cited to our next meeting…
  • Stumps in the road

    clairegebben
    15 Jun 2015 | 3:44 pm
    When it comes to historical research, it’s all too easy to follow one thread, then another, until progress slows to the pace of a journey by horse and wagon in the 18th century. Ohio near St. Clairsville, 2015Currently, in my studies of Scots immigrants to Ohio, I’m on the trail of pre-canal, pre-railroad travel. Via interlibrary loan, I’ve checked out a copy of Margaret Van Horn Dwight’s diary, published under the title “A Journey to Ohio in 1810.” A delightful account of an arduous trip delayed again and again, due to weather, flooding rivers, and a…
  • Trips end

    clairegebben
    8 Jun 2015 | 3:22 pm
    Chambers Bay Golf Course We’re back home in Seattle, where the U.S. Open golf tournament is about to begin. What a trip, beginning with chill and blustery Scotland, continuing in warmer, drizzling Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and concluding in Freinsheim Germany with a heat wave. Reformed Evangelical Protestant Church tower in the center of Freinsheim And with plenty of toasts at the Freinsheimer Altstadtfest. To close, below are just a few photos and memories. Cheers! The Altstadtfest runs for three days. We only lasted one (because our flight left early on day 2, naturally). Croft…
  • Spargelmania, and the Wohnmobile

    clairegebben
    5 Jun 2015 | 4:31 pm
    This morning Matthias and I bicycled, at my request, to an asparagus field. Perhaps a strange tourist stop, but I couldn’t picture how asparagus is grown underground here (on purpose, to keep it white instead of green). When we arrived, we stood for awhile watching the morning harvesters. Asparagus (Spargel) is picked twice a day, in the morning and the evening. If you want to go deeper, read all about “Spargelmania” here. As we stood gazing at the field, Matthias turned to me with a quizzical expression. “What do you call those pieces of timber that hold up the roof…
  • Food and drink adventures

    clairegebben
    4 Jun 2015 | 10:03 am
    It wouldn’t be a travel blog without a post about food and drink. On Dave and my recent tour through Scotland, the Netherlands, and Germany, we’ve tasted such a delicious variety. The most unusual dish I had in Scotland: wood pigeon with black pudding, served on what appeared to me to be a (carefully scrubbed) slate roof tile. I ordered it at a restaurant in Inverness called the Mustard Seed. The wood pigeon is the largest bird of the dove family, also known in England as the Culver. The previous day, I had asked a waiter about Scottish black pudding, and he’d paused.
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    History of Massachusetts »

  • Ann Putnam, Jr: Villain or Victim?

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    6 Jul 2015 | 8:27 am
    Ann Putnam, Jr., was one of the afflicted girls during the Salem Witch Trials and the daughter of the witch trials ringleader Thomas Putnam. Born on October 18, 1679 in Salem, Ann Putnam, Jr., was the oldest of 10 children … Continue reading →
  • Reverend John Cotton: Puritan Reformist

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    17 Feb 2015 | 7:19 am
    John Cotton was a clergymen from England who moved to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1633. John Cotton’s Early Life: Cotton was born on December 4, 1585, in Derby, England to Rowland Cotton, a lawyer, and Mary Hubert. He attended … Continue reading →
  • Anne Hutchinson: Religious Rebel

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    26 Jan 2015 | 7:57 am
    Anne Hutchinson was a Puritan religious leader and midwife who moved from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. The following are some facts about Anne Hutchinson: Hutchinson was born Anne Marbury in Alford, Lincolnshire, England on July 20, … Continue reading →
  • History of the Massachusetts Bay Colony

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    5 Jan 2015 | 10:17 am
    Massachusetts Bay Colony was a British settlement on the East Coast of North America in the 17th century. It was located in what is now modern-day central New England. Who Founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony? Massachusetts Bay Colony was founded … Continue reading →
  • The Sons of Liberty: Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    24 Nov 2014 | 8:35 am
    The Sons of Liberty was a group of political dissidents that formed in the North American British colonies during the early days of the American Revolution. The following are some facts about the Sons of Liberty: Definition of the Sons … Continue reading →
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    History of Massachusetts »

  • Ann Putnam, Jr: Villain or Victim?

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    6 Jul 2015 | 8:27 am
    Ann Putnam, Jr., was one of the afflicted girls during the Salem Witch Trials and the daughter of the witch trials ringleader Thomas Putnam. Born on October 18, 1679 in Salem, Ann Putnam, Jr., was the oldest of 10 children … Continue reading →
  • Reverend John Cotton: Puritan Reformist

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    17 Feb 2015 | 7:19 am
    John Cotton was a clergymen from England who moved to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1633. John Cotton’s Early Life: Cotton was born on December 4, 1585, in Derby, England to Rowland Cotton, a lawyer, and Mary Hubert. He attended … Continue reading →
  • Anne Hutchinson: Religious Rebel

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    26 Jan 2015 | 7:57 am
    Anne Hutchinson was a Puritan religious leader and midwife who moved from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. The following are some facts about Anne Hutchinson: Hutchinson was born Anne Marbury in Alford, Lincolnshire, England on July 20, … Continue reading →
  • History of the Massachusetts Bay Colony

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    5 Jan 2015 | 10:17 am
    Massachusetts Bay Colony was a British settlement on the East Coast of North America in the 17th century. It was located in what is now modern-day central New England. Who Founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony? Massachusetts Bay Colony was founded … Continue reading →
  • The Sons of Liberty: Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    24 Nov 2014 | 8:35 am
    The Sons of Liberty was a group of political dissidents that formed in the North American British colonies during the early days of the American Revolution. The following are some facts about the Sons of Liberty: Definition of the Sons … Continue reading →
 
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    Ancient Origins

  • A Fish is a Wish Your Heart Makes - The 2,200-year-old Tale of the Chinese Cinderella

    Ryan Stone
    28 Jul 2015 | 7:15 pm
    Before there was Cinderella, there was Ye Xian. Undeniably one of the most well-read fairy tales, Cinderella describes the life of a young woman forced into servitude by her stepmother until she is freed by her fairy godmother and a charming prince. Meet the Cinderellas: Ye Xian, Zezolla, and Cendrillon Considered to have been first dictated in the 17th century by Italian writer Giambattista Basile, and later streamlined in the 18th century by the renowned Frenchman Charles Perrault, the version of Cinderella that most have read is, in truth, a later telling of a much older story. …
  • Dark Mysteries of the Deep: Ancient Divers and their Dangerous Journeys

    lizleafloor
    28 Jul 2015 | 3:59 pm
    It is not known who first braved cold, dark waters and held their breath to explore, or gather rare treasures or food, but divers have been retrieving items from beneath the water’s surface since the dawn of man. The Mesopotamians retrieved pearls from oysters as early as 4,500 years ago. The Greeks, too, traded in pearls and sea sponges, and the Chinese are said to have followed soon after. In antiquity the only way to explore the mysterious underwater world was to hold one’s breath and free-dive. The archaeological record and ancient marine artifacts reveal that free-divers possessed…
  • Skeleton with Elongated Skull Discovered in Russia

    Alicia McDermott
    28 Jul 2015 | 2:06 pm
    A skeleton with an elongated skull has been uncovered at Arkaim, known as the Stonehenge of Russia. Dating to the second or third century AD, the elongated skull has created a stir for alien enthusiasts and archaeologists alike. The Akraim site is located in the Southern Urals in Russia and is dated to the 17th century BC. The settlement in which the skeleton with the elongated skull was found is dated to 4,000 years ago, while the skeleton itself is 2,000 years old. As the skeleton is so much younger than the site, researchers do not believe it is really connected to the Akraim…
  • Analysis of Viking burial site reveals the harshness of life in early Christian Iceland

    Robin Whitlock
    28 Jul 2015 | 6:29 am
    Early Viking settlers in Iceland were Pagan worshippers of the Aesir, the family of gods that included Thor and Odin. However in 1,000 AD Iceland converted to Christianity by decree of the country’s National Assembly under the rule of Olaf Tryggvason. This in turn resulted in a change in burial customs, such that the deceased began to be buried in cemeteries organized around a church. New research conducted by bioarchaeologists Guđný Zoëga and Kimmarie Murphy has revealed just how harsh life at that time was. The two scientists investigated a small cemetery near a farm called Keldudalur…
  • Prehistoric fortress island discovered on English-Welsh border

    Robin Whitlock
    27 Jul 2015 | 7:22 pm
    Archaeologists excavating a modern housing estate on the English-Welsh border in Monmouth, UK, have discovered an ancient fortress consisting of a wooden island with a fortified farmhouse elevated above the ground on stilts. The structure used to stand above the waters of an ice age lake and may be older than Stonehenge or the Egyptian pyramids. The structure, known as a ‘crannog’, has been dated to 4,900 years ago. The lake surrounding it would have served as a natural defence against attackers.Read moreSection: NewsHistory & Archaeology
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    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • Everyday Life in Pompeii

    28 Jul 2015 | 4:46 am
    Two thousand years ago, Mount Vesuvius - a stratovolcano located close to the Gulf of Naples - erupted with tremendous force and little warning. Within only 24 hours, the Roman city of Pompeii was buried under a rain of hot ash and falling debris. Lying undiscovered for over 1,600 years, the city's rediscovery remains one of the greatest archaeological finds of all time. Pompeii: In the Shadow...
  • Assessing the Destruction at Hatra

    27 Jul 2015 | 9:00 am
    Last month reports swept through the global media that ISIS had used bulldozers to level the ancient city of Hatra. ISIS has already destroyed a number of irreplaceable sculptures from Hatra in the Mosul Museum, lending immediate credibility to reports from Iraqi antiquities officials that ISIS fighters had destroyed Hatra itself as well. However, no videos or other confirmation surfaced for...
  • Lucius Cornelius Sulla: Guardian or Enemy of the Roman Republic?

    27 Jul 2015 | 7:55 am
    For centuries, Lucius Cornelius Sulla has been reviled as a maniacal tyrant who defiled the Roman constitution and instituted bloody purges, but some modern historians assert that he has been judged too harshly. They present him as a republican champion who predominantly acted out of necessity and often with the best of intentions. As always, the truth is more complex. Sulla was born in 138 BCE...
  • Pandora

    27 Jul 2015 | 4:47 am
    Pandora is a figure from Greek mythology who was not only the first woman, but --as an instrument of the wrath of Zeus-- was held responsible for releasing the ills of humanity into the world. Pandora was also an unrelated earth goddess in the early Greek pantheon. Pandora as an Instrument of Punishment The name Pandora means "gifts" and "all". According to (and perhaps even invented...
  • Kanchipuram

    24 Jul 2015 | 12:48 am
    Kanchipuram (sometimes simply called Kanchi or Kanci) is an ancient city in the Tamil Nadu region of southern India. Once a capital of the Pallava dynasty, Kanchipuram was also a noted centre of learning for Tamil and Sanskrit scholars. Known as ‘the religious capital of the South’ its early 8th century CE Kailasanatha temple is one of the most impressive structures surviving from ancient...
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    AncientHistoryLists » AncientHistoryLists

  • Top 10 ancient Roman foods and drinks

    Saugat Adhikari
    21 Jul 2015 | 7:13 am
    Ancient Rome was one of the largest empire of its time, primarily based around the Mediterranean. Naturally, much of the food and drink habits of the ancient Romans were influenced by popular sustenance grown in the Mediterranean region – the primary food item being wheat. Romans typically had three meals a day – jentaculum was their breakfast, prandium was the name for their lunch and cena or dinner used to be the main meal. The food and drinks served for the main course varied according to the Roman classes. The eating habits of rich Romans were far too lavish and…
  • Top 10 outstanding ancient Roman arts

    Saugat Adhikari
    2 Jul 2015 | 8:41 am
    It is well known that ancient Rome was one of the biggest empires to have ever existed in human history. For this reason, the topic of ancient Roman art becomes far broader than one might expect it to be, since it involves observing traditional art practiced for over 1000 years across the vast regions of Africa, Asia and Europe. The earliest recognizable pieces of ancient Roman art date back even beyond 500 BCE. The paradigm of Roman art was clearly influenced by the artistic practices popular at the time of the classical Greek era. The Romans took whatever they could learn from already…
  • Top 10 ancient Roman inventions

    Saugat Adhikari
    25 May 2015 | 9:29 am
    Throughout history, the biggest of inventions have defined civilizations, changing the way of life with a single purpose – to make living more enduring and easy with far lesser hindrances. The ancient world was full of such possibilities since there was so much to invent and discover. Ancient Rome is undoubtedly one of the more prominent names that is extensively known, for making inventions that changed the course of human nature and development. Needless to say, the ancient Roman inventions gave shape to the Roman civilization as we know it today. In many cases, the Roman inventions were…
  • Top 10 ancient Greek goddesses

    Saugat Adhikari
    7 Apr 2015 | 10:27 am
    Most of us are well aware of those astounding heroics of ancient Greek gods. But the goddesses from ancient Greek mythology are none lesser at all both in terms of popularity and symbolic significance. Just like the Olympian gods, most of the ancient Greek goddesses resided in the realms of heavens above mount Olympus (though there were quite a few exceptions too). The goddess too had special powers and could also control specific aspects of life. From the motherly Rhea who dared to trick her own husband to save her children, to the queen of gods Hera or the goddess of wisdom Athena who was…
  • Top 10 Ancient Greek Gods

    Saugat Adhikari
    31 Mar 2015 | 3:39 am
    The stories of gods and goddess from the ancient Greek mythology are immensely popular in pop culture. Their characters were popularized and subsequently immortalized by some famous play writers in ancient Greece that included the likes of Homer and Hesiod. What makes the folklore behind these ancient Greek deities stand apart is the way their stories deviated from that of other contemporary ancient religions. The Greek gods resembled humans not only in their form but also in their nature and emotions. Many of us might remember how Theseus slayed the Minotaur, how Hades would rule the…
 
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    New Historian

  • Young Irelander Rebellion

    Daryl Worthington
    28 Jul 2015 | 11:02 am
    On 29th July, 1848, the Young Irelander Rebellion was brought to a close with the arrest of William Smith O’Brien in South Tipperary. The nationalist uprising came during the Irish Potato Famine, a period of devastating food shortages which killed around a million people – an eighth of Ireland’s population. Millions more emigrated from Ireland, heading abroad to the United States, Canada, and Australia. Initially triggered by a potato blight which lasted for three years in succession, the Famine robbed over a third of the Irish population of their regular source of…
  • Neolithic House Full of Bodies Unearthed in China

    Irina Slav
    28 Jul 2015 | 10:49 am
    A dwelling dating back 5,000 years and containing a surprising number of human remains has been unearthed in northeastern China. The research team excavating the Hamin Mangha site counted a total of 97 different sets of remains, some complete, others consisting of just a skull and some limb bones. The researchers believe the most probable reason the bodies were collected in the dwelling was a disease outbreak that killed its hosts so quickly that the survivors had no time to give the deceased a proper burial, Live Science reports. Based on examination of the bones the team from Jilin…
  • 18th Century Village Uncovered Beneath Montreal Highway

    Irina Slav
    28 Jul 2015 | 10:36 am
    The ground beneath the most bustling and crowded highway interchange in Montreal is the site of what’s left of an eighteenth century village, it has been recently revealed. Construction crews had been hard at work on the Turcot Interchange for months, discovering artifact after artifact until finally the building efforts were brought to a halt. Researchers have reported that the village of Saint-Henri-des-Tanneries, dating back to the latter days of the 1700s, is the identity of the town uncovered by construction workers; the village had once been a part of the burgeoning leather trade of…
  • US Army Evicts Bonus Marchers

    Daryl Worthington
    27 Jul 2015 | 11:30 am
    On 28th July, 1932, the US Army forcibly evicted Bonus Marchers from the protest camp they had set up in Washington D.C. Coming in the middle of the Great Depression, the event was taken as further evidence that President Herbert Hoover had no sympathy for the plight of the poorest in American society. The Bonus Marchers were veterans of the First World War who had first marched on Washington in May 1932 seeking cash payment of their veterans’ bonuses. In 1918, following the end of the war, the US Government assumed that its war risk insurance plan would adequately provide for sailors…
  • Bronze Age Skeleton Holds Secrets to Life Near Stonehenge

    Irina Slav
    27 Jul 2015 | 11:01 am
    The skeleton of a teenager dated back 4,000 years holds secrets about life in Bronze Age southern Britain that scientists are now hoping to uncover. The body was unearthed in Marden Henge, Wiltshire, some 24 km from Stonehenge and also near another famous Bronze Age site, Avebury. The child was buried in the fetal position, with an amber necklace. The body, around 1.50 m in height, will be examined so the researchers, led by archaeologist Jim Leary from the University of Reading, can determine the gender of the child, the cause of death and the time of burial. In addition, analysis of its…
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    The List Love » History

  • 10 Interesting Anne Frank Facts

    The List Love
    24 Jul 2015 | 2:45 am
    The Holocaust claimed the lives of approximately 6 million Jewish people, and an additional 5 million non-Jewish people. Anne Frank was one of the lives that was tragically taken as a result of the mass genocide created by Adolf Hitler’s unmerciful Nazi regime. One thing they did not take away from Anne was her story, which lives on in her diary entries that have been read and studied across the world. We should never forget the unfathomable acts of the Holocaust, and so we ask you please read 10 interesting facts about Anne Frank, in the hope the genocide is never be forgotten. 1. Anne…
  • 10 Strange Facts About Jeffrey Dahmer

    The List Love
    15 Jun 2015 | 5:05 am
    Jeffrey Dahmer, coined the Milwaukee Cannibal, was an American serial killer and sex offender, who murdered, raped and dismembered boys between the years 1978 to 1991. His later murders included cannibalism and necrophilia. Take a look at 10 strange facts about Jeffrey Dahmer… 1. Jeffrey Dahmer’s Hernia image via campus.digication.com Jeffrey Dahmer was like every other little boy until he had minor surgery to correct a double hernia at the age of six years old. However, the surgery brought about a change in the young boy. The surgery also coincided with the arrival of his little…
  • 10 Reasons You Want to be Queen Elizabeth II

    The List Love
    15 May 2015 | 11:43 am
    Have you ever wondered what it was like to be Queen Elizabeth II? There has to be some perks for being queen of 16 of 53 member states in the Commonwealth of Nations. Here are 10 reasons you will want to be Queen Elizabeth II. 1. Queen Elizabeth’s Shoes image via www.manchesterfashion.com How would you like to take a walk in Queen Elizabeth II’s shoes? All you have to do is become a member of her household staff, because an employee will wear Her Majesty’s shoes before she puts them on to make sure they are comfortable. 2. £5 Note image via currencyguide.eu Before Her Royal Highness…
  • 10 Unbelievable Albert Einstein Facts

    The List Love
    14 May 2015 | 7:45 am
    We here at The List Love are offering 10 unbelievable Albert Einstein facts that will make your jaw drop. Many people know Einstein as the man behind EMC=2, or as one of the most influential physicists of the 20th century. There was, however, so much more to the Nobel Prize Winner, as you’re about to find out… 1. Einstein & His First Cousin image via www.tyneoconnell.com Albert Einstein once said “rejoice with your family in the beautiful land of life” – wise words from a very wise man. In fact, Albert Einstein loved to rejoice with his family so much that he…
  • 10 Interesting Facts About The Louvre

    The List Love
    12 May 2015 | 6:37 am
    The Louvre is one of Paris’ most visited attractions, welcoming approximately 9.3 million visitors per year. The reason for its popularity is its collection of 35,000 priceless masterpieces and antiques, and is therefore offers the most extensive art galleries for its breadth of subjects, which range from 6th century BC to 19th century. In celebration of this popular museum and art gallery, here are 10 interesting facts about the Louvre. 1. The Biggest Museum in the World image via www.cnn.com The Louvre is the biggest museum in the world. It is so big that it is humanely impossible…
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    Milling Minutes

  • The Impact of the Civil War on John Chapman – Part 3

    chapmansmill
    22 Jul 2015 | 7:45 pm
    Western Lunatic Asylum Circa 1840 Part two of a three part article. Click Here to read part one and Click Here to read part 2. This piece was originally written in 2011 by Ellen Percy Miller. It details the life and fortunes of John Chapman before the Civil War and his rapid decline following it. Broken by the maltreatment to him by Union soldiers, the destruction of his property and the certain knowledge he had lost the Mill which his father had admonished in his will, was not to leave the family, John Chapman suffered a mental breakdown. His family said he became a lunatic in 1862 and they…
  • Summertime at the Mill

    chapmansmill
    18 Jul 2015 | 11:54 am
    We have two big events coming up early next month.  Be sure to visit the Mill August 1 for Bruce Slawter’s presentation on his new children’s book “The Horse that Saved the Union.”  Then, on August 2 come out to Barrel Oak Winery to support the Mill during our wine tasting fundraiser August 1 The Horse that Saved the Union: A Book Talk with Bruce Slawter 11AM Come join us for a special talk about the creation of a new nonfiction book on the Civil War for students, parents, and teachers. Discover a compelling story, known by children of the 19th Century but forgotten…
  • The Impact of the Civil War on John Chapman – Part 2

    chapmansmill
    9 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    Part two of a three part article. Click Here to Read part one. This piece was originally written in 2011 by Ellen Percy Miller. It details the life and fortunes of John Chapman before the Civil War and his rapid decline following it. Then came the Civil War! Thoroughfare Gap was a strategic passageway for both armies as they went back and forth between Northern Virginia and the Shenandoah Valley. For the first time in world military history, trains were used to transport troops to battle and thus they went right by John Chapman’s two mills. In 1861 John Chapman contracted with the…
  • The Impact of the Civil War on John Chapman – Part 1

    chapmansmill
    2 Jul 2015 | 3:27 pm
    John Chapman – Owner of the Mill During the Civil War Part one of a three part article. This piece  was originally written in 2011 by Ellen Percy Miller.  It details the life and fortunes of John Chapman before the Civil War and his rapid decline following it.  John Chapman (1814-1866), 7th Chapman of the five generations to own Chapman’s Mill is an interesting example of a civilian who was a true casualty of the Civil War, being ruined economically, emotionally and physically by the experience. John Chapman was a wealthy, ambitious man from a wealthy, visionary Tidewater family…
  • Old Newspaper Article Raises New Questions

    chapmansmill
    25 Jun 2015 | 5:32 am
    Here at TTMAC, we’re always looking for new pieces of information about the history of the Chapman – Beverley Mill.  Sometimes documents we uncover help answer long-standing debates about the Mill’s history and other times they simply lead to more questions.  Recently, we stumbled across the following article originally published in the Alexandria Gazette in 1851: Alexandria Gazette 15 Aug 1851 MILL FOR RENT – The Subscriber offers for rent for the next season, “THE NEW MILL at this place. It has two pair of Burrs, and a pair of Corn Stones a first rate Smutt…
 
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    eaglesanddragonspublishing.com

  • Pythagoras’ Golden Verses – For a Good Life

    AdamAH
    27 Jul 2015 | 6:32 pm
    There has been a lot of negativity in the news these past weeks, mostly directed at Greece and Greek people. Many comments, including from high-profile public personages, have been outright prejudiced. Don’t worry. I’m not going to get into politics, who’s right, and who’s wrong, and how only the bankers seem to be winning anything. Ok, I slipped there. Sorry. With all the hatred and vitriol floating around the Web, I needed to go back to something uplifting, something ancient. I went back to a bit of research I had done on Pythagoras and the Golden Verses. These are a series of…
  • Ancient Everyday – Time for a Bath

    AdamAH
    21 Jul 2015 | 6:02 pm
    Showering, bathing and generally keeping clean is something that we take for granted today. For most people, washing is part of the daily routine. If you look at the Middle Ages, this was not the case. In fact, medieval people were pretty filthy. This isn’t surprising as bathing was considered a sin by many. This wasn’t the case for ancient Romans, thank the gods. As we do today, the Romans bathed and washed regularly, and as with going to the toilet, bathing was yet another very social activity for Romans. Throughout the Roman Empire, public and private baths were common, owing something…
  • Tiryns: Mycenaean Stronghold and Place of Legend

    AdamAH
    5 Jul 2015 | 9:51 am
    This week, I wanted to leave behind the sad and depressing subject of the destruction of heritage to write about a site steeped in myth and legend – Tiryns. “In the south-eastern corner of the plain of Argos, on the west and lowest and flattest of those rocky heights which here form a group, and rise like islands from the marshy plain, at a distance of 8 stadia, or about 1500 m. from the Gulf of Argos, lay the prehistoric citadel of Tiryns, now called Palaeocastron.” (Heinrich Schliemann; Tiryns; 1885) I visited the site with family during the summer of 2002. It was a scorcher…
  • Preserving the Past – Some Thoughts on the Importance of Historic Places

    AdamAH
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:54 pm
    I’m talking about something a bit more personal for this post. Recently, I went back to my home town with my family. We were in the area and so we thought it might be fun to take a drive through the old neighbourhood. It’s kind of weird passing by primary and secondary schools where you spent so much time, and then happily pushed them from your mind. All that feel like another life. Our last stop was the last house my family owned. It was the oldest house in the area (over 100 years old), and belonged to the original landowner who had settled the area. This is a picture of the house: As…
  • The Links Between History and Mythology – A Guest Post by Luciana Cavallaro

    AdamAH
    22 Jun 2015 | 6:15 pm
    Today I have a special guest on the blog. Luciana Cavallaro is the author of a series of mythological retellings from the perspectives of some fascinating women in Greek myth. When I read her book, The Curse of Troy, I knew that I wanted to have her write a guest post for Writing the Past. Luciana has a wonderfully unique style, and she gives these accursed women of Greek myth a voice that you may not have heard before. So, without further ado, a big welcome to author, Luciana Cavallaro! First, I’d like to thank Adam for inviting me to be a guest blogger. I’ve been following Adam’s blog…
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    Mapshole: Uncommon Knowledge

  • How to Get a Free VPN as a Student

    Rob Rose
    15 Jul 2015 | 2:16 pm
    It would be nice if a hosting service straight up offered a free student VPN; unfortunately that’s not the case but I did discover another way to get a free VPN as a student. (If you don’t know what a VPN is, check out this link Many companies offer promotions for students and this method combines a few of those offers to get a free VPN. I’ve detailed the necessary steps bellow.1. Sign up for DigitalOceanIn order to make this work, you’re going to need a DigitalOcean account which you can create here. DigitalOcean is an IaaS provider that provides affordable…
  • Canadians are Stealing US Tax Dollars

    Rob Rose
    6 Jul 2015 | 9:00 am
    America’s northern neighbor might seem peaceful and friendly but secretly Canadians are stealing US tax dollars, and it all happens in a town named Escourt, Quebec. Escourt is a town populated by 3,000 Canadians and 4 Americans. This is a result of strangely drawn borders that leave a small sliver of the town inside the US state Maine.The only point of interest in this small sliver is a gas station named Gaz Bar US and the sliver is named, appropriately, Escourt Station, Maine. However, despite the small size and tiny population, Escourt Station still manages to draw many Canadian…
  • Flag Day and Relators

    Rob Rose
    15 Jun 2015 | 9:00 am
    Here’s some uncommon knowledge: apparently yesterday (June 14th) was Flag Day. If you didn’t remember don’t worry neither did I, at least not until I noticed the cheap plastic flag planted at the end of my driveway. You see, every year a local realtor plants flags at the end of the driveways of everyone in the local neighborhood. This is of course accompanied by a pamphlet hung on the door handle explaining how much he wants you to GTFO so he can sell your house. He says it politely of course. Now I have no way of knowing for sure, but I can venture to guess that my local…
  • Hello Cracked Readers!

    Rob Rose
    14 Jun 2015 | 4:49 pm
    I noticed I got a big spike in traffic today which can only mean one thing: one of my Cracked articles went live. Since that is the case (the borders article I cowrote was posted) I’d like to welcome the hundreds of people who are bombarding my site with views to my meager blog. If you’ve spent more than a couple of seconds here, you’ve probably noticed that I don’t really update on the schedule I’d like to (that is, every Monday, Wednesday and Friday). Good news though! I finished writing a piece about flag day that I plan on posting tomorrow sometime around…
  • Why I Chose to Invest in Valero Energy Corporation

    Rob Rose
    15 May 2015 | 7:15 am
    First and foremost, I’ll admit that I am not a stock market expert and this post does not constitute investing advice but I’d like to explain why I’m investing in Valero Energy Corporation. Wednesday (May 13th) however I decided to liquidate my measly four shares in Tesla Motors (NASDAQ:TSLA) at the price of $243.69 and invest in 12 shares of Valero Energy Corporation (NYSE:VLO). I put all remaining cash into Schwab’s S&P 500 Index fund (MUTF:SWPPX). In doing so, I hope to have made a good mid-term value investment. I’ve detailed my reasons within this post.
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    A List of 5

  • 5 Weird Medical Inventions That Are Really Helpful For Mankind

    12 Jul 2015 | 11:25 pm
    The Science of treating people is becoming advanced day by day and more inventions have been happening than ever before. Scientists like in other fields have also made some devices that seem to be too weird and strange to be used.Here, I have summed up five such inventions made in recent years that are really really obscure and bizarre.5. Mermaid Endoscope DeviceIt might be hard to believe the existence of a self-propelling endoscope device with a name " mermaid ". The device was invented by scientists from Osaka medical college and Ryukoku University in Japan.The device is more like a…
  • 5 Urban Legends That Turned Out To Be Realities

    1 Jul 2015 | 10:54 am
    With the rise of pop culture, the art of legends in the urban territories tends to increase with the development of more and more mysterious things in the new modern cities. These urban legends most of the time ( actually almost all the time ) are just unreal facts being diffused among the people and especially in between children. But sometimes it does happen that expected things turn to be unexpected.So for your interest, I have summed up a list of 5 such urban legends that turned out to be authentic actually. #5  The Human Fat EatersslatearchivesAn urban legend kept on…
  • 5 Ways Social Media Is The Most Powerful Weapon Of Influence

    28 Jun 2015 | 9:44 am
    Social media has its roots anchored deep in our society. We are now surrounded by its effects all the way in our daily life and those who are using social media are increasing in number day by day. The influence of social media is so deep that we are adding it in all the activities of our life. We are getting the latest news from it, we are growing our business from it, we are having fun from it.I have summarized a list of  " 5 " ways that I found about the social media and its influence.1. It's A Great Source of News Since its beginning, social media had maintained its status of…
  • 5 Acts of Evil Committed By World's Famous Corporations

    25 Jun 2015 | 1:36 am
    There are companies out there that get themselves involve in many evil acts. These companies may play dirty acts to get their benefits. They may act evil for few bucks and profits. So, here I have jotted down a list of 5 famous companies from all over the world which had remained engaged in some evil works somewhere in their history.5. Nestle - distributing baby formula free in Third WorldDistributing milk powder in poor countries isn't bad but making a market of it is immoral and should be considered as evil. This was the case when in 1970s Nestle hired nurses to distribute baby formula…
  • 5 Ways Scammers Can Stole Your Money From ATM

    23 Jun 2015 | 9:18 am
    Scammers keep on finding new ways of deceiving others in their dirty tricks. They are genuine genius minds who, unfortunately, use their tricks for bad things. There are several different ways by which many scammers are successful in hacking your personal details about your ATM and debit cards. They used to hack ATMs by employing latest modern technologies and minds to stole your money from ATMs.Following I have summed up a short list of 5 ways which are trendy and use by scammers.5. Lebanese LoopImage: scams.wikispacesMaybe the simplest of all trickery ways apply by scammers and…
 
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    Listverse

  • 10 Alleged Past Lives Of Famous People

    JFrater
    29 Jul 2015 | 12:01 am
    The notion of reincarnation is an alien concept to many Western minds steeped in Christian tradition. Yet many have also come to accept it and its accompanying doctrine of karma as the most logical answer to the mystery of evil and human suffering. Included among the ranks of believers were such thinkers and geniuses as […] The post 10 Alleged Past Lives Of Famous People appeared first on Listverse.
  • 10 Historical Challenges With Big Prizes

    JFrater
    29 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    Money can be a powerful incentive. It’s the main reason why many people get out of bed and go to work every day. It’s also the main reason behind numerous innovations and daring feats. We like to think of scientists as doing their work purely to benefit mankind and of daredevils acting on pure adrenaline, […] The post 10 Historical Challenges With Big Prizes appeared first on Listverse.
  • 10 Discoveries Of Lost Cultures That May Rewrite Our History

    JFrater
    29 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    It’s been said that history is written by the victors. But sometimes, history is rewritten (or at least given a few edits) by archaeologists, historians, and other researchers who unearth the secrets of lost cultures long after the victors have perished. Still, for all we’ve learned, many mysteries remain. 10Underground AniTurkey Photo credit: Fragwurdig/Wikimedia Although […] The post 10 Discoveries Of Lost Cultures That May Rewrite Our History appeared first on Listverse.
  • 10 Problems With Modern Democracies And Their Institutions

    JFrater
    28 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    Liberal democracy has seemingly won out over its royalist, fascist, and collectivist rivals over the course of the last few centuries, and the freedom to vote has been steadily expanded to those who were without it. But the liberal democracies of the world do have problems, and here are 10 of the most serious. 10 […] The post 10 Problems With Modern Democracies And Their Institutions appeared first on Listverse.
  • 10 Intriguing Pieces Of Evidence For Bible Stories

    JFrater
    28 Jul 2015 | 12:00 am
    Many people think the stories in the Bible couldn’t possibly be true. But whether from archaeological finds or physics students reconstructing Noah’s ark, we’re amassing more scientific evidence every year. Of course, it’s important to note that the Bible isn’t a history book, nor is it intended to be one. As a book of religious […] The post 10 Intriguing Pieces Of Evidence For Bible Stories appeared first on Listverse.
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    Charlie R. Claywell

  • President Warren Harding — A Lady’s Man?

    charileclaywell
    27 Jul 2015 | 5:57 am
    There is a reason few people can recall anything Ohio native and 29th president of the United States, Warren Harding did — he didn’t do much. One of his greatest accomplishment came after he died — landing at the top of the Worst U.S. presidents list. He has remained near the top ever since. Born in […]
  • ‘Inside Out’ Packs Powerful Punch

    charileclaywell
    21 Jul 2015 | 5:57 am
    My wife, daughter and my schedules all aligned nicely the other day so we decided to take in Pixar’s latest movie — Inside Out. The film is about the voices inside the head of an 11-year-old girl who has the perfect life until her family moves from Minnesota to San Francisco. The girl, Riley, is […]
  • ‘Providence Has Given Us This Victory’ (or maybe not)

    charileclaywell
    14 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    If you are looking for an excellent book about the history of the Republican Party, the 2014 release by Heather Cox Richardson — To Make Men Free: A History of the Republican Party — is a great choice. Richardson presents a concise history from the Party’s inception to the current era which is no easy task […]
  • Great Sources For Free Or Inexpensive Books

    charileclaywell
    8 Jul 2015 | 5:46 am
    “Never trust anyone who has not brought a book with them.” ― Lemony Snicket, Horseradish Although a worthwhile endeavor, reading can be a very expensive habit if you consume a large quantity of books. Fortunately the Web offers plenty of online sources for inexpensive books, and for those who prefer a physical location, a few […]
  • Free Genealogy Records Until July 15

    charileclaywell
    3 Jul 2015 | 6:46 am
    If you want or need American Revolutionary era historical documents, Fold3 is offering free access for the next two weeks. An email I received from them states, As we celebrate America’s independence this month, learn more about the people who made it possible by exploring Fold3’s Revolutionary War Collection for free July 1st to 15th. […]
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    The Shadow of Ideas - History, Politics, and Current Events on the Edge

  • Ep. 15 - Russian Foreign Policy and the Syria Conflict

    Raymond Wiley
    27 Jul 2015 | 4:07 pm
    In this episode, Raymond is joined again by John Dolan a.k.a. Gary Brecher a.k.a. The War Nerd to discuss modern Russian foreign policy and the conflict in Syria. More detailed show notes will be available soon. Show Reference Notes: Gary Brecher is The War Nerd on Pando The War Nerd on Facebook @TheWarNerd on Twitter The Shadow of Ideas Website: shadowofideas.com Email: shadowofideas@gmail.com Become a Patron: http://www.patreon.com/shadowofideas Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/shadowofideas Follow us on Twitter: @shadow_of_ideas Subscribe in ITunes: …
  • Ep. 14 - Confederate Collapse with The War Nerd

    Raymond Wiley
    14 Jul 2015 | 8:03 pm
    Raymond is joined by John Dolan a.k.a. Gary Brecher a.k.a. The War Nerd for the last of three episodes about the origins and legacies of the American Civil War.  The nasty business of war is juxtaposed with the magnificence of artful warfare.  Followed by an interesting compare and contrast of Sherman's March to the Sea with Nathanael Greene's Race to the Dan River.  John talks about some of the major figures in his article, "The Confederates who should've been hanged."  This episode wraps up with a discussion on the effects of  the revisionist version of the Civil War had on…
  • Ep. 13 - Origins of the Civil War - Part 2

    Raymond Wiley
    12 Jul 2015 | 9:25 am
    In the last episode, Raymond discussed the major political events of the 19th Century, ending with the Compromise of 1850.  Continuing on, he begins with the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which became the most important event leading to the American Civil War.    With the resulting destruction of the Whig Party, an immediate backlash causes the formation of the Republican Party.  As Conservative tempers flair, Senator Charles Sumner is severely beaten on the floor of the U.S. Senate.  The Dred Scott Decision uses the provisions of the 5th Amendment to allow slave owners to take their…
  • Ep. 12 - Origins of the Civil War - Part 1

    Raymond Wiley
    3 Jul 2015 | 11:33 am
    With all of the recent controversy surrounding the Confederate flag, Raymond explores the  causes of the American Civil War.  Starting in the early part of the 19th Century with the Louisiana Purchase, the ban on the importation of slaves, and the War of 1812.  Moving forward to the Missouri Compromise of 1820 and the shifting balance of power in the U.S. Senate.  Tensions in the South rise with talk of rebellion and succession as a result of the Wilmot Proviso following the Mexican-American War.  Finishing with a survey of the provisions and ramifications of the Compromise of 1850.
  • Ep. 11 - A Brief History of Gay Marriage

    Raymond Wiley
    29 Jun 2015 | 8:30 am
    Raymond is joined by Matt Baume of Marriage News Watch to discuss the recent Supreme Court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide.  They begin with the emergence of the gay rights movement in the 1960s and move forward decade by decade.  Touching on many of the major events and key figures that have helped push marriage equality to the forefront of national discourse.  Followed by a brief analysis of the reactions to the Supreme Court decision throughout the LGBT community.  With such a momentous victory, Matt explains where the battle for gay rights will go from…
 
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