History

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  • Paternoster elevators

    Mirabilis.ca
    Mirabilis
    15 Aug 2015 | 9:52 pm
    Well. These seem awesome! From the Guardian: Lovin’ their elevator: why Germans are loopy about their revolving lifts. As the paternoster cabin in which he was slowly descending into the bowels of Stuttgart’s town hall plunged into darkness, Dejan Tuco giggled infectiously. He pointed out the oily cogs of its internal workings that were just about visible as it shuddered to the left, and gripped his stomach when it rose again with a gentle jolt. “We’re not supposed to do the full circuit,” he said. “But that’s the best way to feel like you’re on a ferris wheel or a…
  • Sunday 31 August 1662

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys
    Samuel Pepys
    31 Aug 2015 | 5:59 pm
    (Lord’s day). Waked early, but being in a strange house, did not rise till 7 o’clock almost, and so rose and read over my oaths, and whiled away an hour thinking upon businesses till Will came to get me ready, and so got ready and to my office, and thence to church. After sermon home and dined alone. News is brought me that Sir W. Pen is come. But I would take no notice thereof till after dinner, and then sent him word that I would wait on him, but he is gone to bed. So to my office, and there made my monthly accounts, and find myself worth in money about 686l. 19s. 2½d., for…
  • Conservatives Are Waiting For Their Shot At Dismantling The New Deal

    History in the News
    31 Aug 2015 | 2:58 pm
    It's always so depressing to read these articles, because the conservative legal movement's Federalist Society has so much more money on its side. They have extensive infrastructure, they have connections, they recruit and offer financial aid to young law students, they ease their way and oh, by the way, here's what we want to do: Destroy the very idea of social contracts.
  • Undercover Republican Goes Hillary-Hunting in Clinton Library

    Breaking News
    1 Sep 2015 | 3:17 am
    Day after sweltering Arkansas day, an anonymous RNC staffer toils inside the Clinton Library, opening file after file—in search of the detail from the past that’ll sink the front-runner.
  • Andrew Jackson: Good, Evil and the Presidency

    American Presidents Blog
    Jennie W
    21 Aug 2015 | 10:51 pm
    This documentary explores the life and presidency of Andrew Jackson.  This explores both sides of Jackson.  Obviously, Jackson is our first “common” president and thus helps to bring the “common man” into politics more fully.  Yet he oversees some of the most controversial decisions, like Indian removal and is extremely vicious in all his dealings with Native Americans.  He was also a slave owner.  There is also the scandals with his wife and Peggy Eaton. This is a good look into the many sides and faces of Jackson.  A good basic overview of his…
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    Mirabilis.ca

  • Paternoster elevators

    Mirabilis
    15 Aug 2015 | 9:52 pm
    Well. These seem awesome! From the Guardian: Lovin’ their elevator: why Germans are loopy about their revolving lifts. As the paternoster cabin in which he was slowly descending into the bowels of Stuttgart’s town hall plunged into darkness, Dejan Tuco giggled infectiously. He pointed out the oily cogs of its internal workings that were just about visible as it shuddered to the left, and gripped his stomach when it rose again with a gentle jolt. “We’re not supposed to do the full circuit,” he said. “But that’s the best way to feel like you’re on a ferris wheel or a…
  • The mixed-up brothers of Bogotá

    Mirabilis
    13 Aug 2015 | 7:48 pm
    The Mixed-Up Brothers of Bogotá is a NYT article about two sets of twins. The article summary: After a hospital error, two pairs of Colombian identical twins were raised as two pairs of fraternal twins. This is the story of how they found one another — and of what happened next. [continue] It’s long. It’s interesting.
  • Why we should add food to the cultural canon

    Mirabilis
    13 Aug 2015 | 7:40 pm
    From aeon.co: Why we should add food to the cultural canon. One summer afternoon in the city of Sumter in South Carolina, three men – a farmer, a scholar, and a landscape architect – stood in a field boiling watermelon juice. They had pressed the juice themselves from Bradford watermelons, a favoured fruit of the antebellum South. The Bradford has white seeds, deep ruby flesh, and a rind so soft it can be scooped with a spoon. It had been thought extinct since the early 1900s, when watermelons with tough rinds suitable for shipping displaced it. But it had been quietly growing for more…
  • Northwest Coast Archaeology is back!

    Mirabilis
    13 Aug 2015 | 7:24 pm
    One of my favourite blogs, Northwest Coast Archaeology, has been dormant for nine months. But today the blogger there (Quentin Mackie) published a new post: Life from Ash and Ice: A documentary film about Mt. Edziza. If you’re interested in the archaeological history of the northwest coast of North America, Quentin’s blog is worth reading.
  • Linguist explains secret language of Gulliver’s Travels

    Mirabilis
    12 Aug 2015 | 2:49 pm
    From Science Daily: Linguist explains secret language of Gulliver’s Travels. Irving N. Rothman, a professor of English literature and Jewish studies at UH, says the mystery words are, in fact, variations of Hebrew. His conclusions are published in the summer 2015 edition of Swift Studies, an annual review of scholarship on the work of novelist Jonathan Swift from the Ehrenpreis Center. In the article, “The ‘Hnea Yahoo’ of Gulliver’s Travels and Jonathan Swift’s Hebrew Neologisms,” Rothman points out a number of clues he used to reach this conclusion.
 
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    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Sunday 31 August 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    31 Aug 2015 | 5:59 pm
    (Lord’s day). Waked early, but being in a strange house, did not rise till 7 o’clock almost, and so rose and read over my oaths, and whiled away an hour thinking upon businesses till Will came to get me ready, and so got ready and to my office, and thence to church. After sermon home and dined alone. News is brought me that Sir W. Pen is come. But I would take no notice thereof till after dinner, and then sent him word that I would wait on him, but he is gone to bed. So to my office, and there made my monthly accounts, and find myself worth in money about 686l. 19s. 2½d., for…
  • Saturday 30 August 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    30 Aug 2015 | 5:59 pm
    Up betimes among my workmen, and so to the office, where we sat all the morning, and at noon rose and had news that Sir W. Pen would be in town from Ireland, which I much wonder at, he giving so little notice of it, and it troubled me exceedingly what to do for a lodging, and more what to do with my goods, that are all in his house; but at last I resolved to let them lie there till Monday, and so got Griffin to get a lodging as near as he could, which is without a door of our back door upon Tower Hill, a chamber where John Davis, one of our clerks, do lie in, but he do provide himself…
  • Friday 29 August 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    29 Aug 2015 | 5:59 pm
    Up betimes and among my workmen, where I did stay with them the greatest part of the morning, only a little at the office, and so to dinner alone at home, and so to my workmen again, finding my presence to carry on the work both to my mind and with more haste, and I thank God I am pleased with it. At night, the workmen being gone, I went to my office, and among other businesses did begin to-night with Mr. Lewes to look into the nature of a purser’s account, and the business of victualling, in which there is great variety; but I find I shall understand it, and be able to do service there…
  • Thursday 28 August 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    28 Aug 2015 | 5:59 pm
    I observe that Will, whom I used to call two or three times in a morning, would now wake of himself and rise without calling. Which though angry I was glad to see. So I rose and among my workmen, in my gown, without a doublet, an hour or two or more, till I was afraid of getting an ague, and so to the office, and there we sat all the morning, and at noon Mr. Coventry and I dined at Sir W. Batten’s, where I have now dined three days together, and so in the afternoon again we sat, which we intend to do two afternoons in a week besides our other sitting. In the evening we rose, and I to…
  • Wednesday 27 August 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    27 Aug 2015 | 5:59 pm
    Up and among my workmen, my work going on still very well. So to my office all the morning, and dined again with Sir W. Batten, his Lady being in the country. Among other stories, he told us of the Mayor of Bristoll’s reading a pass with the bottom upwards; and a barber that could not read, that flung a letter in the kennel when one came to desire him to read the superscription, saying, “Do you think I stand here to read letters?” Among my workmen again, pleasing myself all the afternoon there, and so to the office doing business till past 9 at night, and so home and to bed.
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    History in the News

  • Conservatives Are Waiting For Their Shot At Dismantling The New Deal

    31 Aug 2015 | 2:58 pm
    It's always so depressing to read these articles, because the conservative legal movement's Federalist Society has so much more money on its side. They have extensive infrastructure, they have connections, they recruit and offer financial aid to young law students, they ease their way and oh, by the way, here's what we want to do: Destroy the very idea of social contracts.
  • Legal experts see no criminal trouble for Clinton thus far

    31 Aug 2015 | 10:31 am
    Experts in government secrecy law see almost no possibility of criminal action against Hillary Clinton or her top aides in connection with now-classified information sent over unsecure email while she was secretary of state, based on the public evidence thus far. Some Republicans, including leading GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump, have called Clinton's actions criminal and compared her situation to that of David Petraeus, the former CIA director who was prosecuted for giving top secret information to his paramour.
  • Legal experts see no criminal trouble for Clinton thus far

    31 Aug 2015 | 10:31 am
    Could Clinton or her aides be in legal jeopardy if they sent classified information over unse... . FILE - In this April 23, 2015 file photo, former CIA director David Petraeus leaves the federal courthouse in Charlotte, N.C. Could Hillary Rodham Clinton or her aides be in legal jeopardy if they sent classified informa... .
  • Hurricane Katrina 10 years on: Bill Clinton demands recovery for all

    31 Aug 2015 | 8:17 am
    A decade on from Hurricane Katrina, former US President Bill Clinton spoke at a commemorative event in New Orleans where he focused on the uneven recovery the city has made.
  • Shaheen to formally endorse Clinton on Saturday in Portsmouth

    31 Aug 2015 | 4:01 am
    It's been expected for well more than a year. But Sen. Jeanne Shaheen's official endorsement of Hillary Clinton for president on Saturday will come at an important time.
 
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    American Presidents Blog

  • Andrew Jackson: Good, Evil and the Presidency

    Jennie W
    21 Aug 2015 | 10:51 pm
    This documentary explores the life and presidency of Andrew Jackson.  This explores both sides of Jackson.  Obviously, Jackson is our first “common” president and thus helps to bring the “common man” into politics more fully.  Yet he oversees some of the most controversial decisions, like Indian removal and is extremely vicious in all his dealings with Native Americans.  He was also a slave owner.  There is also the scandals with his wife and Peggy Eaton. This is a good look into the many sides and faces of Jackson.  A good basic overview of his…
  • Tea and Equality

    Jennie W
    16 Aug 2015 | 1:05 am
    This article was in the Summer 2015 edition of Prologue.  It deals with the invitation to tea that Mrs. Hoover sent Mrs. DePriest, the only African American member of Congress.  Mrs. DePriest came to tea and a flood of complaints flooded Mrs. Hoover over this invitation. 
  • FDR Visits Alaska

    Jennie W
    22 Jun 2015 | 1:39 am
    I actually read this article in the "real" paper last fall and am just getting around to posting it.  This talks about the fishing he did while in Alaska.  He didn't visit much of the state during this 1944 trip.When I think of FDR and Alaska, I actually think of his New Deal program which sent colonists to Alaska in 1935 from Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan.  The reason is that two of those colonists were my great-grandparents.   My grandmother was six months old when she arrived with them. 
  • American Experience: FDR

    Jennie W
    8 Jun 2015 | 6:34 pm
    So I've been on a history documentary kick and thought I'd try to get some posts up about them.  I recently watched the American Experience on FDR.  I really haven't seen an American Experience I didn't like and this was no exception  I really learned quite a bit about his early career (like he ran for VP in the 1920s!) or how and when he got polio.  I guess I somehow thought he got it as a kid and it just didn't incapacitate him until later (yes, my medical knowledge...not so great!).I thought this did a great job of talking about Eleanor and her contributions as…
  • FDR Decides Thanksgiving

    Jennie W
    26 Nov 2014 | 6:22 pm
    Are you ready for Thanksgiving?  Here is a fun article talking about setting the date for Thanksgiving and the furor FDR created in 1939 when he set the date for Thanksgiving!American Thanksgiving is the fourth Thursday in November. Countless institutions depend on this date being predictable year in and year out: football teams planning their "Turkey Bowl" games, schools setting their vacation schedules, department stores deciding when to put up their Christmas decorations.But the Thanksgiving date wasn't always so reliable. For decades, the president got to decide when the holiday…
 
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    History According to Bob

  • Nazi Propaganda Part 2

    Bob Packett
    31 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    This show is part 2 of 2 on Nazi Propaganda.
  • Background to Antipater

    Bob Packett
    29 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    This show is about he background to Antipater the man who controlled Europe for Alexander.
  • Landing at Vera Cruz

    Bob Packett
    28 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    This show is about American troops landing at Vera Cruz to open up a second front.
  • Napoleons Farewell

    Bob Packett
    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    This show is about Napoleon leaving the Fontainebleau and saying goodbye to his Imperial Guard.
  • Hannibals Dilemma

    Bob Packett
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    This show is about Hannibals Rubicon Decision to attack or not to attack the city of Rome.
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    african american history - Google News

  • New encyclopedia documents African American contributions to Kentucky - Evansville Courier & Press

    31 Aug 2015 | 3:34 pm
    Evansville Courier & PressNew encyclopedia documents African American contributions to KentuckyEvansville Courier & PressYears before she became the first African American White House correspondent, Logan County-born schoolteacher-turned-journalist Alice Dunnigan noticed something lacking in Kentucky history textbooks. There was very little, she discovered, referencing ...
  • So Sad -- The First African-American Actor To Play Jean Valjean In Les ... - PerezHilton.com

    31 Aug 2015 | 9:14 am
    PerezHilton.comSo Sad -- The First African-American Actor To Play Jean Valjean In Les PerezHilton.comThis is so sad. Kyle Jean-Baptiste made history when he became the first African-American actor to play Jean Valjean of Les Misé​rables in a Broadway production, a run on which he had performed throughout the summer. [ Related: Texts Reveal How Teen ...Kyle Jean-Baptiste, Broadway's 1st Black Jean Valjean, Dies After Fall; 'Les KTLA1st African-American actor to play Jean Valjean on Broadway diesFox NewsFirst African American to play Broadway lead in 'Les Miserables'…
  • New Tampa library branch is unique African-American history research facility - Bay News 9

    30 Aug 2015 | 5:16 am
    Bay News 9New Tampa library branch is unique African-American history research facilityBay News 9The library not only has thousands of books but also highlights Tampa's culture and legacy of African-American history. And the location is no accident as the facility is nestled near Perry Harvey Park and Central Avenue, a once-booming location for
  • Tom Eblen: Kentucky African American Encyclopedia reveals many of state's ... - Lexington Herald Leader

    29 Aug 2015 | 2:02 pm
    Lexington Herald LeaderTom Eblen: Kentucky African American Encyclopedia reveals many of state's Lexington Herald Leader"I can't tell you how many folks we met like Yvonne Giles," Smith said, referring to the woman whose years of research have made her an authority on black history in Lexington. "They could point out all the places, tell you the history of the buildings
  • Frank Petersen, Marines' First Black Aviator and General, Dies at 83 - NBCNews.com

    27 Aug 2015 | 7:45 pm
    FOX43.comFrank Petersen, Marines' First Black Aviator and General, Dies at 83NBCNews.comRetired Lt. Gen. Frank E. Petersen, who made history twice as the first African-American aviator in the Marine Corps and then as the Corps' first African-American general, has died at 83, the Marines' announced. Petersen, who flew more than 350 combat ...Frank Petersen, first African-American Marine aviator, diesFOX43.comall 162 news articles »
 
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    The New York History Blog

  • Sullivan County’s Honeymoon Murder

    John Conway
    31 Aug 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Loch Sheldrake, or Sheldrake Pond, as it was known before many of the ponds in Sullivan County became lakes overnight as part of the late 19th century tourism boom, is one of the deepest bodies of water in the region. It was a favorite dumping ground for Murder, Inc. when the enforcement arm of organized […]
  • Gravestone Preservation Workshop in New Paltz

    Editorial Staff
    31 Aug 2015 | 9:00 am
    On September 19th and 20th, Historic Huguenot Street will host a two-day Gravestone Preservation Workshop in its historic 17th century burial ground led by monuments conservator, preservationist, and teacher Jonathan Appell, founder of the New England Cemetery Service. The goal of this hands-on training workshop is to educate attendees on the various challenges and techniques […]
  • Schenectady Suds: Historic Stockade Beer Tour

    Editorial Staff
    31 Aug 2015 | 6:35 am
    The Schenectady County Historical Society will host walking tours of the Historic Stockade District to examine the history of brewing in the area from the colonial era to today’s craft brew revival. Each tour begins with a look at the SCHS exhibit Hops & Hogsheads: Beer from Colonial to Craft Brew, and concludes with a […]
  • This Week’s New York History Web Highlights

    Editorial Staff
    28 Aug 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Richard Jense: ‘No Irish Need Apply’ Didn’t Exist Common Core In Historical Context What I Do: Valerie Paley, New-York Historical Society Less Than Half of Major Social-Science Studies Reproducible Whither The New York State Historian? Long Lake Man Spent Vietnam War In Salvage Eric Foner: Civil War Struggle and Progress A History of Stripping in […]
  • 75-Year-Old History Book Finally Published

    Bob Cudmore
    28 Aug 2015 | 9:00 am
    This week “The Historians” podcast features an interview with Dave Northrup, editor of the late Hugh Donlon’s book The Mohawk Valley (Mountain Air Books); Donlon wrote the book during the 1930s when he was a reporter and columnist for the Amsterdam Evening Recorder. You can listen here. “The Historians” podcast is also heard each Monday […]
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    Discovery News

  • 5-Foot-Long Spider Relative Found in Iowa

    31 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Long before dinosaurs and humans there was a spider relative, shaped like a Greek warship, which swam around Iowa seeking prey.
  • Is Alaska our future?

    31 Aug 2015 | 1:30 pm
    It’s an ideal laboratory -- or perhaps a harbinger -- of how climate change could affect the rest of the lower 48 states.
  • NASA Picks Target for New Horizons' Next Flyby

    31 Aug 2015 | 1:25 pm
    After a successful flyby of Pluto in July, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will be redirected to visit a small, icy body known as 2014 MU69, located nearly a billion miles farther into the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune.
  • This Ice Cream Doesn't Melt

    31 Aug 2015 | 1:00 pm
    The secret ingredient, a naturally occurring protein, could make the sweet treat melt-resistant. Continue reading →
  • 330-Pound Beavers: What Earth Would Look Like Without Us

    31 Aug 2015 | 12:10 pm
    A new study demonstrates what the world would look like for mammals if the most destructive super predator of them all had never been around.
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    Toptenz.net

  • 10 Outrageous International Fast Food Options

    Zach Keenum
    31 Aug 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Up until recently, we was under the impression that the United States sat atop the throne uncontested for “world’s fattest country”, and it also seemed like general knowledge that many countries resent America for holding that title. After careful, painstaking, and sometimes stomach-turning research, we’ve found that many other countries are producing over-the-top fast food […] The post 10 Outrageous International Fast Food Options appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Amazing Islands You Probably Don’t Know

    Marcia Frost
    30 Aug 2015 | 9:10 pm
    When you think of island vacations, visions of Caribbean beaches with endless pina coladas are probably the first thing that comes to mind. The truth is that there are amazing islands throughout the world that are perpetually flying under the radar. These islands are lesser known because they don’t provide typical sightseeing, sunbathing, and watersports, […] The post 10 Amazing Islands You Probably Don’t Know appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Animals Who Took Really Long Roadtrips to Get Where They Are Today

    Sarah Ouellet
    29 Aug 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Whether they are our next-door neighbors or the animals at the zoo (or those neighbors with kids that belong in a zoo), everyone has a place of origin and a story of how they got to where they are now. Too often, we assume one’s background by where they live and their present status. However, […] The post 10 Animals Who Took Really Long Roadtrips to Get Where They Are Today appeared first on Toptenz.net.
 
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    History Of Macedonia

  • Κοινωνική βόμβα για τις χώρες «τράνζιτ»

    Stern
    23 Aug 2015 | 10:42 am
    Σταύρος Τζίμας Σε μια μετακινούμενη ανθρώπινη «βόμβα» που απειλεί την κοινωνική συνοχή και τη σταθερότητά τους εξελίσσονται για τις χώρες του «βαλκανικού διαδρόμου» οι ολοένα διογκούμενες προσφυγικές ροές των δυστυχούντων. Το ορατό ενδεχόμενο να εγκλωβιστούν στα εδάφη τους δεκάδες ή και εκατοντάδες χιλιάδες Σύροι,…
  • Τα Σκόπια άνοιξαν τα σύνορα

    Stern
    22 Aug 2015 | 1:27 am
    Από τις συμπλοκές μεταξύ των αστυνομικών των Σκοπίων και των προσφύγων τραυματίστηκαν 10 άτομα, από τα οποία τουλάχιστον τέσσερα μεταφέρθηκαν στο Κέντρο Υγείας Πολυκάστρου, αλλά και στο Νοσοκομείο του Κιλκλίς Σταύρος Τζίμας Ο ορατός κίνδυνος βίαιης εισβολής χιλιάδων απελπισμένων προσφύγων στο έδαφος της ΠΓΔΜ, που μπορεί να…
  • 1η Πανσερραϊκή Συνάντηση Μακεδόνων-Φεστιβάλ ζουρνά

    Stern
    21 Aug 2015 | 5:45 am
               1η Πανσερραϊκή Συνάντηση Μακεδόνων- Φεστιβάλ ζουρνά startsovo Related posts:
  • Σε κατάσταση έκτακτης ανάγκης τα σύνορα των Σκοπίων

    Stern
    21 Aug 2015 | 4:48 am
    Εκατοντάδες πρόσφυγες κατέκλυσαν χθες τις αποβάθρες του Σταθμού Λαρίσης περιμένοντας το τρένο για Θεσσαλονίκη. Σταύρος Τζίμας Σε μια απέλπιδα προσπάθεια να αποτρέψουν τη συνεχιζόμενη μαζική εισροή προσφύγων από την Ελλάδα στο έδαφός τους, τα Σκόπια έθεσαν χθες σε κατάσταση έκτακτης ανάγκης τη μεθόριό τους στον νότο αλλά…
  • Πιέζουν τα Σκόπια για ένταξη στο ΝΑΤΟ

    Stern
    19 Aug 2015 | 4:58 am
    Η πΓΔΜ περιμένει υπερβολικά μεγάλο χρονικό διάστημα για την ένταξή της στο ΝΑΤΟ, δήλωσε ο πρόεδρος της χώρας Γκιόργκι Ιβάνοφ. Ο κ. Ιβάνοφ, μιλώντας χθες σε τελετή με την ευκαιρία της « Ημέρας των Ενόπλων Δυνάμεων» της πΓΔΜ, σημείωσε πως η χώρα του είναι έτοιμη για ένταξη στο ΝΑΤΟ και πως αν το ΝΑΤΟ είναι έτοιμο για την ένταξη…
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    Claire Gebben

  • Cleveland and Cuyahoga County Genealogy resources

    clairegebben
    7 Aug 2015 | 11:00 am
    Recently, I bumped into the website Cleveland and its Neighborhoods, which has a wealth of “History, Genealogy, and Other Peripheral Subjects pertaining to Cleveland, Ohio” compiled by Laura Hine. It’s an incredibly comprehensive resource, one that didn’t readily pop up during my novel research, so I thought I’d give it a shout out here. At the bottom of the “Cleveland and Its Neighborhoods” home page is another link to Hine’s sister site: “just about everything that you need to know about doing genealogy research in Cleveland and Cuyahoga…
  • Abroad and at home

    clairegebben
    10 Jul 2015 | 9:33 am
    This May, I had the privilege of visiting the Archives Research Centre in Inverness, where I took a peak at Croy Parish Church registers. The Kirk, as it was known in those days. Unlike modern church sessions (at least, those of the mainline denominations with which I’m familiar), these Kirk sessions included provincial trials of misdeeds such as fist-fighting on the Sabbath. Here’s an excerpt from one such record: Croy July 13 1740 James Mitter Gardiner in [Cabrach] & Margaret Gordon in Mitten Delated for undecent correspondence are appointed to be cited to our next meeting…
  • Stumps in the road

    clairegebben
    15 Jun 2015 | 3:44 pm
    When it comes to historical research, it’s all too easy to follow one thread, then another, until progress slows to the pace of a journey by horse and wagon in the 18th century. Ohio near St. Clairsville, 2015Currently, in my studies of Scots immigrants to Ohio, I’m on the trail of pre-canal, pre-railroad travel. Via interlibrary loan, I’ve checked out a copy of Margaret Van Horn Dwight’s diary, published under the title “A Journey to Ohio in 1810.” A delightful account of an arduous trip delayed again and again, due to weather, flooding rivers, and a…
  • Trips end

    clairegebben
    8 Jun 2015 | 3:22 pm
    Chambers Bay Golf Course We’re back home in Seattle, where the U.S. Open golf tournament is about to begin. What a trip, beginning with chill and blustery Scotland, continuing in warmer, drizzling Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and concluding in Freinsheim Germany with a heat wave. Reformed Evangelical Protestant Church tower in the center of Freinsheim And with plenty of toasts at the Freinsheimer Altstadtfest. To close, below are just a few photos and memories. Cheers! The Altstadtfest runs for three days. We only lasted one (because our flight left early on day 2, naturally). Croft…
  • Spargelmania, and the Wohnmobile

    clairegebben
    5 Jun 2015 | 4:31 pm
    This morning Matthias and I bicycled, at my request, to an asparagus field. Perhaps a strange tourist stop, but I couldn’t picture how asparagus is grown underground here (on purpose, to keep it white instead of green). When we arrived, we stood for awhile watching the morning harvesters. Asparagus (Spargel) is picked twice a day, in the morning and the evening. If you want to go deeper, read all about “Spargelmania” here. As we stood gazing at the field, Matthias turned to me with a quizzical expression. “What do you call those pieces of timber that hold up the roof…
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    History of Massachusetts »

  • Martha Corey: The Gospel Woman of Salem

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    31 Aug 2015 | 6:52 am
    Martha Corey, wife of Salem Village farmer Giles Corey, was convicted of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. Martha Corey, whose maiden name was Panon, had a controversial past. In 1677, she gave birth to a mixed-race son … Continue reading →
  • The Salem Witch Trials Victims

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    19 Aug 2015 | 6:57 am
    The Salem Witch Trials took place in the town of Salem in the Massachusetts Bay Colony between 1692-1693. Historians believe the accused witches were victims of mob mentality, mass hysteria and scapegoating. The witch trials began in March of 1692, … Continue reading →
  • Ann Putnam, Jr: Villain or Victim?

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    6 Jul 2015 | 8:27 am
    Ann Putnam, Jr., was one of the afflicted girls during the Salem Witch Trials and the daughter of the witch trials ringleader Thomas Putnam. Born on October 18, 1679 in Salem, Ann Putnam, Jr., was the oldest of 10 children … Continue reading →
  • Reverend John Cotton: Puritan Reformist

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    17 Feb 2015 | 7:19 am
    John Cotton was a clergymen from England who moved to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1633. John Cotton’s Early Life: Cotton was born on December 4, 1585, in Derby, England to Rowland Cotton, a lawyer, and Mary Hubert. He attended … Continue reading →
  • Anne Hutchinson: Religious Rebel

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    26 Jan 2015 | 7:57 am
    Anne Hutchinson was a Puritan religious leader and midwife who moved from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. The following are some facts about Anne Hutchinson: Hutchinson was born Anne Marbury in Alford, Lincolnshire, England on July 20, … Continue reading →
 
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    History of Massachusetts »

  • Martha Corey: The Gospel Woman of Salem

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    31 Aug 2015 | 6:52 am
    Martha Corey, wife of Salem Village farmer Giles Corey, was convicted of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. Martha Corey, whose maiden name was Panon, had a controversial past. In 1677, she gave birth to a mixed-race son … Continue reading →
  • The Salem Witch Trials Victims

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    19 Aug 2015 | 6:57 am
    The Salem Witch Trials took place in the town of Salem in the Massachusetts Bay Colony between 1692-1693. Historians believe the accused witches were victims of mob mentality, mass hysteria and scapegoating. The witch trials began in March of 1692, … Continue reading →
  • Ann Putnam, Jr: Villain or Victim?

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    6 Jul 2015 | 8:27 am
    Ann Putnam, Jr., was one of the afflicted girls during the Salem Witch Trials and the daughter of the witch trials ringleader Thomas Putnam. Born on October 18, 1679 in Salem, Ann Putnam, Jr., was the oldest of 10 children … Continue reading →
  • Reverend John Cotton: Puritan Reformist

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    17 Feb 2015 | 7:19 am
    John Cotton was a clergymen from England who moved to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1633. John Cotton’s Early Life: Cotton was born on December 4, 1585, in Derby, England to Rowland Cotton, a lawyer, and Mary Hubert. He attended … Continue reading →
  • Anne Hutchinson: Religious Rebel

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    26 Jan 2015 | 7:57 am
    Anne Hutchinson was a Puritan religious leader and midwife who moved from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. The following are some facts about Anne Hutchinson: Hutchinson was born Anne Marbury in Alford, Lincolnshire, England on July 20, … Continue reading →
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    Ancient Origins

  • Discovery of high official tomb points to reuse of tombs and burial goods in ancient Egypt

    Mark Miller
    31 Aug 2015 | 1:52 pm
    The discovery of an ancient tomb belonging to a vizier (high official) in the Upper Valley outside Luxor, Egypt, points to a curious practice among ancient Egyptians: reuse of burial goods and coffins in subsequent burials and even recycling of tombs. Perhaps the most famous case that came to light recently was the tomb of Tutankhamun, who, researcher Nicholas Reeves believes, was entombed in part of a space meant for Nefertiti. Nefertiti possibly assumed her famous husband Akhenaten’s burial goods, Reeves said. Reeves posits that when Tutankhamun died in 1332 BC, his tomb displaced part of…
  • The Mysterious Holes of Peru: A Pre-Columbian Domestic Water Source for Trans-Oceanic Travelers? Part I

    William James Veall
    31 Aug 2015 | 6:52 am
    No really serious attention has been paid by scientists to resolve the mystery of nearly 7000 'pits' that snake their way for almost one mile across the rugged Cajamarquilla Plain bordering the Pisco Valley of Peru, South America. Just as with their near neighbour the famous Nasca Linesthis curiously patterned stream of cavities (pits) now attracts a plethora of theories concerning its original purpose: silos for grain storage, for water, local tribal defenses, vertical tombs in a mass graveyard - or even a coded message to the Sky Gods!  To date the site has revealed no real artifactual…
  • Huge Ancient Greek City found underwater in the Aegean Sea

    aprilholloway
    30 Aug 2015 | 8:01 pm
    The Hellenic Ministry of Culture, Education and Religious Affairs has announced that remnants of a massive Bronze Age city have been discovered submerged in the Aegean Sea. The settlement, which dates back approximately 4,500 years, covers an area of 12 acres and consists of stone defensive structures, paved surfaces, pathways, towers, pottery, tools, and other artifacts. The discovery was made by a team of experts from the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities, University of Geneva and the Swiss School of Archaeology at Kiladha Bay on the Peloponnese Peninsula south of Athens, while they were…
  • Messages on missiles: Here is a Sugar Plum for You!

    Mark Miller
    30 Aug 2015 | 4:52 pm
    Writing messages on bullets and missiles goes back at least to Biblical times and continues to modern times among Israelis, Jordanians, Americans and others. The practice became industrial to ancient Greeks and Romans, who manufactured lead sling bullets in molds with taunting messages in bas-relief, such as ‘Ouch!’, ‘Be lodged well’, and ‘Here’s a sugar plum for you!’. The Ancient Weapon of the Sling Shot The use of the sling to launch rocks at the enemy is known from the famous battle between David and Goliath in the 9th century BC. Cast lead bullets from 490 BC were also…
  • Nazi gold train could contain lost Amber Room of Charlottenburg Palace

    aprilholloway
    30 Aug 2015 | 1:58 pm
    Last week headlines were made around the world as treasure hunters claimed to have identified a legendary Nazi train packed with gold and money, hidden in a long-forgotten tunnel in the Polish mountains, the location of which has now been confirmed by the Polish Ministry.  Now it has been reported that the train may also contain the long-lost Amber Room of Charlottenburg Palace, an early 1700s room crafted from amber, gold, and precious jewels, estimated to now be worth $385 million.Read moreSection: NewsHistory & Archaeology
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    Unifiniti

  • Mandarin vs. Cantonese: Not a struggle for dominance

    John Lin
    31 Aug 2015 | 10:00 pm
    Mandarin or Cantonese? It might seem like a tough choice, but this blog post will help you narrow down the decision very quickly.An ignorant map of China divided on dialect:Blue is Cantonese, while red is MandarinFor example, Dorothy Feng at Brainscape argues that for foreigners seeking to learn a Chinese language, Mandarin is better. But I don't think that this question even needs to be asked - unless you plan on living in Guangzhou forever, Cantonese is as good as useless.After years of hearing Cantonese in a Chinatown, maybe you now believe that the ratio of Mandarin to Cantonese speakers…
  • Chapter One - Alternate History: Song Chinese Modernization

    John Lin
    30 Aug 2015 | 8:00 am
    Throughout my years as a member of the large Alternate History forum, as well as a (formerly) frequent visitor to the Alternate History Wikia, I found myself bemused by the chauvinism of many when they write anti-Western timelines in which China, Japan, or some Eastern (especially East Asian) nation manages to colonize A) the World, B) Europe, or C) All of the Above.Before I begin this timeline, which is just a vigorous exercise of my mind, I'd like to point out a few reasons why any of the above options would never have happened.No offense, Europe, but you're terribly lacking in terms of…
  • On the Origin of the National Language

    John Lin
    30 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    “But if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought." - George Orwell in his book 1984.In recent years, the Gujarat High Court has been the champion of the anti-Hindi cause throughout India, arguing that Hindi was a foreign language in parts of Gujarat [1] and arguments that Hindi was merely an official language. This article seeks to delve into the issue at hand - what is a national language? Do we need a national language? Furthermore, what is a standard language?What is a National Language?Saint Petersburg is on the far Northwest red circle in Russia.Vladivostok is…
  • Standardized Testing: Birth of a Newborn or Not?

    John Lin
    20 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    We've all gone through it at least once in school, no matter where we live. Whether we're in America, Ukraine, China, France, Israel, Russia, Argentina, Germany, the United Kingdom, Canada, Singapore, Egypt, or India, we've all met this creature face-to-face.Polish students taking an examI'm talking about standardized testing, of course. In America, we call these the SAT, the ACT, or the AP Tests. In Ukraine, we called them the IGTs. In most nations, which I've heard applies to both China and India, among others, the students will take the exam, and based on how successful they are, they will…
  • San Guo Yan Yi and The War of the Three Kingdoms

    xxJojas84
    9 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    When one of your enemies declares that your family to no longer control the house, the only way to answer is by arguing that you're the head of your family now. At least, that's what Liu Bei thought he should do when Cao Pi declared that the Han Dynasty was over.The Three Kingdoms period was a period in Chinese history, part of an period of disunity called the "Six Dynasties". It was written about in a book called the Romance of the Three Kingdoms, or San Guo Yan Yi, which was written in the Ming Dynasty. The Romance of the Three Kingdoms period occurred after…
 
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    Rogues Gallery

  • Russia’s Rudest Rhymer

    The Rake Yesterday
    26 Aug 2015 | 1:31 pm
    St Petersburg 1768 Ivan Barkov, the obscene Russian poet, is dead….but no one can quite remember how. Some say he was fatally injured during a bout of drunken sex in a brothel Others maintain that he drunkenly fell into a privy and drowned. One theory suggests he committed suicide..Leaving behind a heartfelt note reading, “lived sinfully, and died ridiculously” which was found shoved up his arse. Whatever the truth, his work will live on despite the fact that it is so pornographic, it wasn’t published in his life time and won’t see the printed page for another 200 years.
  • “Don’t Call Me Bugsy!”

    The Rake Yesterday
    26 Apr 2015 | 9:42 am
    Nevada 1947 Bugsy was a handsome guy – a real Carey Grant. He don’t look so good now. The bullet hit him on the bridge of his nose and blew his left eyeball clean out – they reckon it was lying fifteen feet away from the sofa. Another went through his cheek and came out of his neck, he took a couple more in the chest…made a real mess of the upholstery. Guess it goes to show no ones immune when you`re in debt to the Mob. One minute he’s sat in his girlfriends pad, reading the newspaper, the next they`re looking for his baby blues underneath the furniture. Can’t say I’m surprised,…
  • “It’s The Devil’s club…I just manage it for him”

    The Rake Yesterday
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:11 am
    London 1723 I like a good orgy as well as the next fellow, but having a drop of blasphemy would really spice it up. “Prigging a Convenient” is much more exciting when she’s dressed as a nun. It’s such a shame the king outlawed our little “Hell-Fire Club.” It only lasted a year but they were great days, much more fun than clubs like The Kit Kat or The Beef Steak,  with all that political posturing. When I stopped calling myself a “Mohock” I really thought my youthful days of wild abandon would be over. Thanks to our former club president, Phillip Duke of Wharton, I…
  • If its new, different or not from this country…I HATE IT!

    The Rake Yesterday
    12 Oct 2014 | 9:17 am
    1852 Sir – As a proud Englishman – who despairs of the depraved cess pit of moral filth into which this once great country has become immersed  – may I use the pages of your august ( if somewhat “Liberal” ) newspaper to extol the virtues of the one gentleman who, alone, stands between Albion and the blackest pits of hell. Colonel Charles de Laet Waldo Sibthorp MP. I heartily agree with this visionary man when he says that foreigners should be distrusted, science and “Progress” is ruining this country and the world was a far, far better place in the halcyon days of our…
  • “Did You Just Spill My Pint?!”

    The Rake Yesterday
    2 Oct 2014 | 8:40 am
    London 1712 Its 6 am, welcome to a glorious November morning here in London’s Hyde Park for what promises to be a truly honourable meeting of two gentlemen, settling their differences in a respectable way. ….By dueling. To my left is James Douglas, 4th Duke of Hamilton , Peer of Scotland and “Master of the Great Wardrobe” accompanied by his “Second”,  Colonel John Hamilton. For those of you not familiar with dueling  (perhaps you work on a farm) “A Second” is a close friend of each combatant who makes sure the duel is fair and honourable and who can also cross swords…
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    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • How Global Heritage Fund Saves Cultural Treasures

    31 Aug 2015 | 6:00 am
    Since its founding in 2002, Global Heritage Fund has protected, preserved and sustained the most significant and endangered cultural heritage sites in the developing world. Focusing its efforts on preservation and responsible development of the most important and endangered global heritage sites, Global Heritage Fund selects projects using the strictest criteria. In this exclusive interview, James...
  • Poulnabrone

    30 Aug 2015 | 8:56 am
    Poulnabrone is a passage tomb in the region known as the Burren, County Clare, Ireland. The name means "Hole of the Quern Stones", but the site is also commonly referred to as "Hole of the Sorrows". Dated to c. 4200 BCE it stands 5.9 feet high (1.8 meters) and 12 feet (3.6 meters) long in a field surrounded by the karst stone formations which make up the Burren. It is defined as...
  • Wonhyo

    30 Aug 2015 | 7:53 am
    Wonhyo (617-686 CE) was one of the most important Buddhist philosophers of his time and a highly influencial scholar whose works impacted a wide array of philosophers and writers who came after him. He is highly regarded as the greatest thinker of his time and a highly prolific writer, producing almost 90 works of philosophy in his lifetime, many of which still exist in whole or in part. Although little...
  • The Great Jewish Revolt of 66 CE

    28 Aug 2015 | 12:54 pm
    The Roman Empire in the early 1st century CE was often regarded as the perfect empire. The outstanding military prowess of the Romans was used to expand the empire, and once the territories were acceptably pacified, Roman political power was installed from the capital of the empire to the local governments of the territories. Perfectly balanced between a mixture of hard (military occupation and intervention...
  • Warriors Across the Ancient World

    28 Aug 2015 | 9:00 am
    This post is part of a series of image posts Ancient History et cetera will be putting together each month. Todays post concerns ancient warriors! Ancient warfare was vastly different from how it is conducted today; the vanquished could be certain that slavery or execution awaited them. Initially, ancient armies were made up of infantry units who would engage enemy forces on the field with spears, shields...
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    AncientHistoryLists » AncientHistoryLists

  • Top 10 surprising facts about ancient Egypt

    Saugat Adhikari
    23 Aug 2015 | 9:47 pm
    The ancient Egypt was one of the most advanced civilization for almost 3000 years. It started out as small settlements on the banks of river Nile, settlements grew into respective kingdoms. These kingdoms were then united into the Kingdom of ancient Egypt around 3100 BC. From there, began the tale of a civilization whose architecture and artifacts remain flawless to this day, giving testimony to once thriving kingdom and its culture. The ancient Egyptians made significant advances in art, architecture and lifestyle that kept them progressive and prosperous for ages. And without a doubt,…
  • Top 10 Amazing Facts About Ancient Rome

    Saugat Adhikari
    18 Aug 2015 | 10:33 am
    Ancient Rome lies in the cradle of one of the biggest civilization in the human history. It started off as a small town on the bank of the Tiber River in central Italy, at the beginning of the eighth century BC. Soon, after countless wars and military campaigns, it encompassed the entire continental Europe around the Mediterranean basin, all of Britain, and a huge part of western Asia and northern Africa. Even more interesting are the various facts and facets about the Roman civilization and the lifestyle of ancient Roman people. From the spectacular battles of gladiators, to the elaborate…
  • Top 10 epidemic diseases that were common in ancient world

    Saugat Adhikari
    13 Aug 2015 | 9:26 pm
    People in the ancient times weren’t the best when it came to maintaining a sanitary and clean environment for living. With lack of sanitation came infections and some infections inevitably led to diseases. Thus began the long shared history between human civilization and illness. Surprisingly, our great, great ancestors were actually far less exposed to infections and diseases. But around 10,000 years ago, people started living in major settlements primarily based on agriculture. As pivotal and revolutionary these settlements were in shaping the future of human civilization, they also…
  • Top 10 ancient Roman foods and drinks

    Saugat Adhikari
    21 Jul 2015 | 7:13 am
    Ancient Rome was one of the largest empire of its time, primarily based around the Mediterranean. Naturally, much of the food and drink habits of the ancient Romans were influenced by popular sustenance grown in the Mediterranean region – the primary food item being wheat. Romans typically had three meals a day – jentaculum was their breakfast, prandium was the name for their lunch and cena or dinner used to be the main meal. The food and drinks served for the main course varied according to the Roman classes. The eating habits of rich Romans were far too lavish and…
  • Top 10 outstanding ancient Roman arts

    Saugat Adhikari
    2 Jul 2015 | 8:41 am
    It is well known that ancient Rome was one of the biggest empires to have ever existed in human history. For this reason, the topic of ancient Roman art becomes far broader than one might expect it to be, since it involves observing traditional art practiced for over 1000 years across the vast regions of Africa, Asia and Europe. The earliest recognizable pieces of ancient Roman art date back even beyond 500 BCE. The paradigm of Roman art was clearly influenced by the artistic practices popular at the time of the classical Greek era. The Romans took whatever they could learn from already…
 
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    New Historian

  • Gaddafi Seizes Power in Libya

    Daryl Worthington
    31 Aug 2015 | 2:47 pm
    Muammar al-Gaddafi successfully lead a coup deposing the Libyan king on the 1st September, 1969. Appointed chairman of the new governing body of Libya, the Revolutionary Command Council, Gaddafi ruled the country for the next four decades until the Libyan Civil War of 2011. Hugely significant in shaping the course of Libyan history since the 1970s, Gaddafi also had a complex, and at times enigmatic relationship with the West. Just this week there have been suggestions that Tony Blair could be called to explain his relationship with Gaddafi to the British Parliament, following claims in David…
  • Polish Authorities Confirm Nazi Train Find

    Irina Slav
    31 Aug 2015 | 2:27 pm
    Poland’s Ministry of Culture has confirmed that a train from the Second World War was found underground near the town of Walbrzych, in the southwestern part of the country. Reports about a “Nazi gold train” emerged about a week ago, but the official confirmation only came on Friday, after the area was examined with ground-penetrating radar, the Guardian reports. Deputy Minister Piotr Zuchowski told media that he was “99% certain” there was a buried train at the location. What’s more, the radar seems to have revealed that the train is armoured, which means it was carrying valuable…
  • Research Reveals Philistines Brought Key Flora to Israel

    David DeMar
    31 Aug 2015 | 2:21 pm
    Newly revealed research findings have demonstrated that the Philistines were likely responsible for the introduction of several key flora to Israel during the Iron Age (twelfth century to seventh century BCE). A team of archaeologists from the Department of Land of Israel Studies and Archaeology from Bar-Ilan University has discovered that when the Philistines arrived in the southern Levant, they brought with them plant species that had never been present in the region before – species such as the opium poppy, the sycamore, and cumin. There’s no record of the edible remains of these three…
  • Poland’s Communist Government Agrees to Strikers’ Demands

    Daryl Worthington
    30 Aug 2015 | 3:08 pm
    On 31st August, 1980, the Communist government of Poland agreed to the demands of striking shipyard workers in the northern coastal city of Gdansk. The event was a key moment, not only in the history of Poland, but the Soviet Union as a whole. For the first time, an act of protest had won concessions from a communist government, rather than suffering repression. The dismissal of Anna Walentinowicz, a crane operator in the Lenin shipyard in Gdansk, was the immediate trigger for the strike. Activist workers, which Walentinowicz also was, had been planning a strike for improved conditions for…
  • Neanderthal “Bathtub” Found in Spain

    Irina Slav
    30 Aug 2015 | 2:16 pm
    New evidence that the Neanderthals were not as primitive as popular opinion would have them is constantly emerging. The latest find in this respect is a hole in the floor of a cave in Abric Romani, near Barcelona, that researchers believe was used for heated water. The hole, according to a statement from the Catalan Institute of Human Palaeoecology and Social Evolution (IPNES), measures 40 by 30 by 10 centimeters and the water in it was heated by throwing hot stones in. Around the hole, the team excavating the Abric Romani site found a number of hearth remains. The hole itself was near one of…
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    Milling Minutes

  • Remembering The Battle of Thoroughfare Gap

    chapmansmill
    27 Aug 2015 | 4:00 am
    Bud Hall Discusses the Battle of Thoroughfare Gap Mr. Bud Hall explains the complexity and importance of the Battle of Thoroughfare Gap, August 28, 1862. At the time this video was made, a cell phone tower was proposed to be be built on the battlefield.  Through the combined efforts of TTMAC, the Civil War Preservation Trust and other preservation-minded organizations and individuals, the tower was diverted thus preserving the historic viewshed of this significant site.
  • Chapman Chancery Records

    chapmansmill
    19 Aug 2015 | 11:19 am
    1774 Bill Involving the Family of Nathaniel Chapman The Library of Virginia has an impressive collection of digitized Chancery Records.  Among the records are a few involving the Chapman family including the item pictured above. It’s interesting to think that for the first thirty years after the Mill was built, the Chapman family would have been answering to the British crown for any legal matters. Transcription from above: George the third by the Grace of God of great Britain, France and Ireland King defender of the Faith &C To the Sheriff of Fauquier County Greeting.  We Command…
  • Mill Ruins: A Labor Day Weekend Jaunt

    chapmansmill
    6 Aug 2015 | 1:21 pm
    chapmansmill:One visitor shares her visit to the Chapman – Beverley Mill. Originally posted on Donna Migliaccio: The ruins of the Chapman/Beverly Mill The old mill wheel is silent and has fallen downThe old oak tree has withered and lies there on the ground – lyrics from “Down By The Old Mill Stream” by Tell Taylor For years I’ve driven past an intriguing stone building located just off I-66 near Haymarket, Virginia.  Nope, not just years – decades.  Every time I’d drive by I’d think, “Man, that’s an interesting old building.  I wonder what it is? Maybe one day I…
  • The Impact of the Civil War on John Chapman – Part 3

    chapmansmill
    22 Jul 2015 | 7:45 pm
    Western Lunatic Asylum Circa 1840 Part two of a three part article. Click Here to read part one and Click Here to read part 2. This piece was originally written in 2011 by Ellen Percy Miller. It details the life and fortunes of John Chapman before the Civil War and his rapid decline following it. Broken by the maltreatment to him by Union soldiers, the destruction of his property and the certain knowledge he had lost the Mill which his father had admonished in his will, was not to leave the family, John Chapman suffered a mental breakdown. His family said he became a lunatic in 1862 and they…
  • Summertime at the Mill

    chapmansmill
    18 Jul 2015 | 11:54 am
    We have two big events coming up early next month.  Be sure to visit the Mill August 1 for Bruce Slawter’s presentation on his new children’s book “The Horse that Saved the Union.”  Then, on August 2 come out to Barrel Oak Winery to support the Mill during our wine tasting fundraiser August 1 The Horse that Saved the Union: A Book Talk with Bruce Slawter 11AM Come join us for a special talk about the creation of a new nonfiction book on the Civil War for students, parents, and teachers. Discover a compelling story, known by children of the 19th Century but forgotten…
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    eaglesanddragonspublishing.com

  • It’s Time for Research, Writing, and History!

    AdamAH
    10 Aug 2015 | 4:49 pm
    I’m going on vacation for the next few weeks, but you can see my daily posts here: Load More...Follow Me on Instagram I’ll be taking a pause from the blog until mid-September, but I won’t be off the radar. I’ve set myself a challenge. As part of my vacation abroad (you’ll have to follow the Instagram photo stream above to see where I am!), I’m hoping to write a full, first draft of my next book, tentatively titled Heart of Fire. I may be mad, but I’ve got the research done, and the story outlined. So, we’ll see. If the Muses are with me, I may feel the olive crown…
  • Facing Fear with the 300 Spartans

    AdamAH
    5 Aug 2015 | 5:12 pm
    Hear your fate, O dwellers in Sparta of the wide spaces; Either your famed, great town must be sacked by Perseus’ sons, Or, if that be not, the whole land of Lacedaemon Shall mourn the death of a king of the house of Heracles, For not the strength of lions or of bulls shall hold him, Strength against strength; for he has the power of Zeus, And will not be checked till one of these two he has consumed. The Pass at Thermopylae Thus spake the the Oracle at Delphi, long ago, as recorded by Herodotus, the ‘father of history’, in Book 7 of The Histories. This was the prophecy that…
  • Pythagoras’ Golden Verses – For a Good Life

    AdamAH
    27 Jul 2015 | 6:32 pm
    There has been a lot of negativity in the news these past weeks, mostly directed at Greece and Greek people. Many comments, including from high-profile public personages, have been outright prejudiced. Don’t worry. I’m not going to get into politics, who’s right, and who’s wrong, and how only the bankers seem to be winning anything. Ok, I slipped there. Sorry. With all the hatred and vitriol floating around the Web, I needed to go back to something uplifting, something ancient. I went back to a bit of research I had done on Pythagoras and the Golden Verses. These are a series of…
  • Ancient Everyday – Time for a Bath

    AdamAH
    21 Jul 2015 | 6:02 pm
    Showering, bathing and generally keeping clean is something that we take for granted today. For most people, washing is part of the daily routine. If you look at the Middle Ages, this was not the case. In fact, medieval people were pretty filthy. This isn’t surprising as bathing was considered a sin by many. This wasn’t the case for ancient Romans, thank the gods. As we do today, the Romans bathed and washed regularly, and as with going to the toilet, bathing was yet another very social activity for Romans. Throughout the Roman Empire, public and private baths were common, owing something…
  • Tiryns: Mycenaean Stronghold and Place of Legend

    AdamAH
    5 Jul 2015 | 9:51 am
    This week, I wanted to leave behind the sad and depressing subject of the destruction of heritage to write about a site steeped in myth and legend – Tiryns. “In the south-eastern corner of the plain of Argos, on the west and lowest and flattest of those rocky heights which here form a group, and rise like islands from the marshy plain, at a distance of 8 stadia, or about 1500 m. from the Gulf of Argos, lay the prehistoric citadel of Tiryns, now called Palaeocastron.” (Heinrich Schliemann; Tiryns; 1885) I visited the site with family during the summer of 2002. It was a scorcher…
 
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    Mapshole: Uncommon Knowledge

  • 4 Reasons Why You Should Wear Your Seat-Belt

    Rob Rose
    21 Aug 2015 | 7:28 pm
    There is some bizarre notion among some drivers that not wearing your seat-belt is a safer way to drive. The idea among these people is that if you don’t wear your seat-belt, there’s a chance you might magically be ejected from scene of an accident and crash into the pavement somewhere outside the car. This is idiotic.4. In an Accident, You Become a ProjectileWhen a car is traveling down the interstate at 60 mph everything in the car is moving with it at that speed- you, your backpack, the stuffed animals on the back window, etc. When your car comes to a sudden stop, such as in a…
  • Advertising

    Rob Rose
    17 Aug 2015 | 2:24 pm
    I switched over from Revenue hits to AdSense. I hope the experience is a little more pleasant. I’ve come across a bug where when I open certain pages, a pop-under appears. I’m not sure what’s causing it. I’ll try to find out. Thanks for reading this quick update!
  • Advertising

    Rob Rose
    30 Jul 2015 | 4:08 pm
    UPDATE: Earlier some ad code that I was testing got stuck in the minify cache. I have since fixed the popunders.Personally, I’m not a fan of advertisements, but they’re a crucial piece of what makes the World Wide Web work. They provide advertising revenue to the millions of content creators across the web, allowing them to continue doing what they do best while keeping the Web free and open for everyone.I am certainly not the most diehard content creator ever. I’ve written various miscellaneous things across the web and I post here, on my blog, occasionally. I haven’t…
  • How to Get a Free VPN as a Student

    Rob Rose
    15 Jul 2015 | 2:16 pm
    It would be nice if a hosting service straight up offered a free student VPN; unfortunately that’s not the case but I did discover another way to get a free VPN as a student. (If you don’t know what a VPN is, check out this link Many companies offer promotions for students and this method combines a few of those offers to get a free VPN. I’ve detailed the necessary steps bellow.1. Sign up for DigitalOceanIn order to make this work, you’re going to need a DigitalOcean account which you can create here. DigitalOcean is an IaaS provider that provides affordable…
  • Canadians are Stealing US Tax Dollars

    Rob Rose
    6 Jul 2015 | 9:00 am
    America’s northern neighbor might seem peaceful and friendly but secretly Canadians are stealing US tax dollars, and it all happens in a town named Escourt, Quebec. Escourt is a town populated by 3,000 Canadians and 4 Americans. This is a result of strangely drawn borders that leave a small sliver of the town inside the US state Maine.The only point of interest in this small sliver is a gas station named Gaz Bar US and the sliver is named, appropriately, Escourt Station, Maine. However, despite the small size and tiny population, Escourt Station still manages to draw many Canadian…
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    Listverse

  • 10 Dark Stories Of Crazed Celebrity Stalkers

    JFrater
    1 Sep 2015 | 12:00 am
    Everyone has had an obsession with a celebrity at some point in their life. Maybe you wrote a fan letter or two during your teenage years that you forgot all about. On the other hand, some people dedicate their entire lives to the adoration of their idols, and sometimes that obsession turns into tragedy. 10Richard […] The post 10 Dark Stories Of Crazed Celebrity Stalkers appeared first on Listverse.
  • 10 Violent Struggles To Control The Spice Trade

    JFrater
    1 Sep 2015 | 12:00 am
    Spices have an interesting and bloody history. While we often hear about the European conquests of the Americas and the rise of colonial empires spanning the globe, we don’t often consider that the root of Western conquest and dominance of the world can be traced back to a simple desire to make rotten meat taste […] The post 10 Violent Struggles To Control The Spice Trade appeared first on Listverse.
  • 10 Insane Facts About Guns And Gun Violence In America

    JFrater
    1 Sep 2015 | 12:00 am
    On August 26, 2015, a mentally disturbed man shot and killed two journalists who were on the air live in Virginia. His awful actions immediately sparked a familiar debate about gun control in America. On one side were those calling for immediate reform. On the other were those fighting against any restrictions on firearms. It’s […] The post 10 Insane Facts About Guns And Gun Violence In America appeared first on Listverse.
  • 10 Bizarre Warplanes Of World War II

    JFrater
    31 Aug 2015 | 12:00 am
    War creates an urgency unmatched during peacetime. As countries compete to create the next great weapon, engineers sometimes resort to unconventional techniques to create their war machines. Nowhere was this more clear than in the skies of World War II, where intrepid aerospace designers dreamed up some of the most bizarre aircraft in history. 10Blohm […] The post 10 Bizarre Warplanes Of World War II appeared first on Listverse.
  • 10 Hardships Plaguing Native American Communities Today

    JFrater
    31 Aug 2015 | 12:00 am
    Native Americans are no strangers to misery, whether from the atrocities of colonialism and the genocide of their people or the numerous tragedies still facing them today. The disadvantages handed down to them throughout history have left many Natives with feelings of isolation, identity crisis, and cultural shame. The consequences of these modern-day hardships act […] The post 10 Hardships Plaguing Native American Communities Today appeared first on Listverse.
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    Charlie R. Claywell

  • Atomic Times A Candid Memoir Of 1950s Testing Site

    charileclaywell
    31 Aug 2015 | 5:45 am
    When I picked up The Atomic Times: My H-Bomb Year at the Pacific Proving Ground on Kindle, I was immediately drawn in by the conversational writing. But the subject matter is hardly casual. The book looks at the military personnel’s exposure to excessive levels of radiation while isolated on the island of Eniwetok Atoll in the […]
  • Quote For The Week: Don’t Stop Playing

    charileclaywell
    24 Aug 2015 | 5:35 am
    We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing. — George Bernard Shaw Who was George Bernard Shaw? Shaw was a multi-talented British man who won the Nobel Peace Prize in Literature (1925) and was a voice for the working class. During his life he accomplished the following: Co-founder […]
  • Funny Friday: Ohio Judge Fines Self For Contempt

    charileclaywell
    21 Aug 2015 | 7:29 am
    When reading the news this week, there were lots of stories about politics, forbidden love, and even where Ohio can — or cannot — buy the drug used in state executions. But all of those stories can be a little too much at times — and depressing. So, it’s kind of refreshing when a lighthearted […]
  • So President Harding Had An Illegitimate Child After All?

    charileclaywell
    14 Aug 2015 | 6:01 am
    I recently posted an entry about Warren G. Harding, Ohio’s last (and possibly most dismal) presidential offering, and in the post I discussed Nan Britton. Britton was a young woman from Harding’s hometown who was infatuated with the president (their affair actually started when Harding was a Senator in D.C.). After Harding’s death, Britton wrote The President’s Daughter, in […]
  • Mystery of America’s First English Colony Solved?

    charileclaywell
    11 Aug 2015 | 5:37 am
    When many people think of the first English colonies in North America, Jamestown, or maybe Plymouth Rock, comes to mind. Few, if any, recall the Roanoke Colony in present day North Carolina. Even though I don’t remember learning about the colony in school (that doesn’t mean it wasn’t taught) once I learned about the colony I […]
 
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    The Shadow of Ideas - History, Politics, and Current Events on the Edge

  • Ep. 17 - Southern Baptist Convention: The New Orthodoxy - Part 2

    Raymond Wiley
    19 Aug 2015 | 11:47 pm
    As Raymond continues his look at the Southern Baptist Convention, he is joined by Russell Miles a.k.a. Brother Russell.  Starting with a discussing the influence of tactics used by the Religious Right in the 1980's on the increasingly vitriolic attacks on social issues.  They then examine the basic theological tenets of the Southern Baptist Convention and the impact on the mindset of political/social conservatives.  Russell explains the catalyst the began his exit from the Southern Baptist Church. Next Episode: The History of Middle Earth! Show Reference Notes: The Last Temptation of…
  • Ep. 16 - Southern Baptist Convention: The New Orthodoxy - Part 1

    Raymond Wiley
    7 Aug 2015 | 9:42 pm
    In this episode, Raymond explores the Southern Baptist Convention and the political, cultural, and demographic influence of the largest Protestant denomination in the United States.  Of interest in the 2015 Annual Church Profile, is the largest decline in membership ever recorded in the history of the Church.  Next he discusses the Conservative Resurgence and the rise to power of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary President, R. Albert Mohler, Jr.  Finally, he ponders the Religious Right's  implications for the Republican presidential candidates. On the next episode,…
  • Ep. 15 - Russian Foreign Policy and the Syria Conflict

    Raymond Wiley
    27 Jul 2015 | 4:07 pm
    In this episode, Raymond is joined again by John Dolan a.k.a. Gary Brecher a.k.a. The War Nerd to discuss modern Russian foreign policy and the conflict in Syria.  Starting with the collapse of the Soviet Union, without any hostilities, and Vladimir Putin's rise to power.  They discuss the increasingly aggressive foreign policy of the Russian Federation, highlighting the 2014 annexation of the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine.  Moving on to Syria, John explains that the Sunni Revolution is a response to the historic changes of the 70s and 80s, when Hafez Assad became president of Syria,…
  • Ep. 14 - Confederate Collapse with The War Nerd

    Raymond Wiley
    14 Jul 2015 | 8:03 pm
    Raymond is joined by John Dolan a.k.a. Gary Brecher a.k.a. The War Nerd for the last of three episodes about the origins and legacies of the American Civil War.  The nasty business of war is juxtaposed with the magnificence of artful warfare.  Followed by an interesting compare and contrast of Sherman's March to the Sea with Nathanael Greene's Race to the Dan River.  John talks about some of the major figures in his article, "The Confederates who should've been hanged."  This episode wraps up with a discussion on the effects of  the revisionist version of the Civil War had on…
  • Ep. 13 - Origins of the Civil War - Part 2

    Raymond Wiley
    12 Jul 2015 | 9:25 am
    In the last episode, Raymond discussed the major political events of the 19th Century, ending with the Compromise of 1850.  Continuing on, he begins with the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which became the most important event leading to the American Civil War.    With the resulting destruction of the Whig Party, an immediate backlash causes the formation of the Republican Party.  As Conservative tempers flair, Senator Charles Sumner is severely beaten on the floor of the U.S. Senate.  The Dred Scott Decision uses the provisions of the 5th Amendment to allow slave owners to take their…
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    Prior to Now » Blog

  • Bath 1700 – 1764

    cassyput
    18 Aug 2015 | 7:50 am
    In looking at the history of Combe Down one, inevitably, has to look at the history of Bath 1700 – 1764.Bath today is very well known, a UNESCO World Heritage site known for its natural hot springs and 18th century Georgian architecture.Your browser does not support iframes.TripAdvisor describes it thus:“Known for its restorative wonders, Bath was once the home of Jane Austen. Sure, you could attempt to conjure up this elegant city by reading Pride and Prejudice in your tub, but as Bath has a lot more history than your bathroom (we assume, anyway) you’d be missing out. A…
  • Old deeds and indentures

    cassyput
    2 Jul 2015 | 7:27 am
    Old deed. Lease and Release. A911873 1516 Jan. 1805I love old deeds. They are works of art. They were written by quill pen and iron gall ink in court hand, chancery hand or secretary hand on large squares of parchment. The heading and capital letter are often ornamented with scroll work. So much work went into them as they represented peoples’ wealth and legal title – something that, not so long ago, could only be shown “on paper”. So, what goes into an old deed?ParchmentParchment is most commonly made of calfskin, sheepskin, or goatskin. It was historically used for writing…
  • 1817 Ordnance Survey map including Combe Down

    cassyput
    16 Jun 2015 | 5:19 am
    Old maps are fascinating.  Just seeing what an area looked like 100 or more years ago on and Ordnance Survey map can give real insights into the place.Of course very old maps tend to be either somewhat inaccurate or have little detailed data because of their scale. Even so they can be interesting and the history of the maps themselves is almost as fascinating. As most people know the mapping of the British Isles has been led by the Ordnance Survey, which was, effectively, started after the Jacobite rising of 1745. The Duke of Cumberland (1721 -1765) realised the army did not have good maps…
  • Particulars of Prior Park sale in 1808

    cassyput
    18 May 2015 | 9:46 am
    I just love old handbills and maps. Bath Record Office has a small treasure trove of them. Here are some prepared for the Prior Park sale in 1808 before John Thomas bought in in 1809. The language is wonderful. “A capital mansion, seated on an eminence, erected, in the most substantial manner, about the Year 1738, by RALPH ALLEN, Esq. Planned for the accommodation of A NOBLEMAN, OR FAY OF DISTINCTION”. If one had the wherewithal it would be difficult to resist. It’s a world away from the ‘estate agent speak’ we are so used to; but then, so is the property.Anyone…
  • Prior Park sale

    cassyput
    5 May 2015 | 6:01 am
    Prior Park sale notice Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette – Thursday 04 September 1800When Gertrude Stafford Smith (née Tucker, previously Warburton), Ralph Allen’s niece and heir died in 1796, the estate passed to Cornwallis Maude, 1st Viscount Hawarden by reason of his marriage to Mary Allen, another niece of Ralph Allen, even though she had died in 1775, as they had a son Thomas Ralph Maude.I indicated previously that Cornwallis Maude may have had little love for Prior Park and that he had some pretty severe money troubles.A bit of further research has indicated that he put…
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    Navrang India

  • Colorful Onam festival of Kerala - intereting legend behind it - Festivals of India

    Jayaraman Kn
    1 Sep 2015 | 2:25 am
    Onam festival, Kerala.www.hindugodwallpaper.com At Puri Jagnnath, during the rath yatra that comes annually in the months of June and July, the darshan  of the Vamana (dwarf) avatar is very important. It means salvation for humans and  release from the human bondage and  travails of  birth and death cycles.  Vamana is an  incarnation of Lord Jagannatha  Onam festival Kerala, India www.sify.comThe encounter of God-incarnate Vamana and the demon king Mahabali is an interesting one and down south in the state of Kerala, Malayalees celebrate with fanfare…
  • Jagannath temple, Puri, - colorful rath yatra

    Jayaraman Kn
    31 Aug 2015 | 8:58 pm
    Jagannath temple, Puri, Odjsha. three raths (chariots) mmts.mmtstraintimings.inPuri Jagannath temple, Giant wheel.www.rathyatra.netThe annual rath yatra festival of Puri is quite famous and a spectacular event attended by lakhs of people and it is part of the temple ritual which has been observed for centuries. This yatra is symbolic of  Sri Krishna's journey  from Gokulam to Mathura - a journey to light from the dark.The concept of the chariot festival is explained in the Kathopanishad in Sanskrit as  follows:'Atmanam  rathinam  viddhi sareeram …
  • George Orwell and Gandhiji to-gether share a small Indian town!!

    Jayaraman Kn
    31 Aug 2015 | 8:44 am
    George Orwellwww.scmp.comGeorge orwell on animals.www.buzzquotes.comMotihari, a nondescript town in East Champaran district of Bihar, India has the unique distinction of being associated with two important personalities of the 20th century whose speeches and writings impacted the society across the globe. The first one is George Orwell novelist, essayist, and critic He is  famous for his   novels Animal Farm (1945) and Nineteen Eighty-four (1949), the latter  being a profound anti-utopian novel that examines the dangers of totalitarian rule. Orwell was born in this…
  • World's Largest Kitchen

    Jayaraman Kn
    28 Aug 2015 | 12:28 pm
    Largest kitchen in the world   Lord Jagannath Temple www.shreekhetra.comPots used for cooking Mahaprasad in the Lord Jagannath Temple Lord Jagannath Temple puriwaves.nirmalya.in In all Hindu temples it has been a long tradition for centuries to prepare prasad (food) for the presiding deity as part of the pooja ritual. There is a separate kitchen (called Madappalli in Tamil) for this purpose on all temples premises.The prasad is served to the people only after the offering is made to the deity by the priests. Further, in many temples almost daily food is prepared for the …
  • Amazing Puri Jagannath Temple , Odisha, India - a vibrant temple complex

    Jayaraman Kn
    27 Aug 2015 | 11:26 pm
    Puri Temple Jagannath, Odidha, India.www.hindutav.comLord Jagannath temple, dedicated to the Lord of the Universe, was built in  the 12th century and  is a unique one located in Puri, Odhisa. It is an important pilgrimage center for the Hindus and is one of the 'Char Dhams' (four divine sites) located in all four directions of India. This temple is well-known for its grandeur, beauty, fascinating sculptures. On one's first visit, one will be struck by the majestic towers and impressive architecture of small several towers in the complex.The  temple  is  designed to…
 
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