History

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  • New Book: A Dictionary Of Vietnam War Slang

    The New York History Blog
    Editorial Staff
    22 Aug 2014 | 3:00 pm
    On August 7th, the US marked the 50th anniversary of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, the basis for the Johnson administration’s escalation of American military involvement in Southeast Asia and war against North Vietnam. A new book, Vietnam War Slang: A Dictionary on Historical Principles (Routledge, 2014) by Tom Dalzell, outlines the context behind the […]
  • Yes, I've Published a Book!

    History Is Elementary
    18 Aug 2014 | 5:53 pm
    I've written and published a book!Of course, that was my intention when I began this blog way back in 2006 when I was still in the classroom, but the book I've published isn't exactly the book I had planned. The planned project - a teaching memoir - will still be published along with a few other projects, but the book you see to the left is what fell in my lap along the way.It needed to be done. History education is my prime focus along with writing curriculum. Over the last couple of years I've written a few college courses used by teacher candidates at Johns Hopkins University School of…
  • Groundbreaking research maps cultural history

    Breaking News
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:19 pm
    The team of net­work sci­en­tists used the birth and death loca­tions of more than 150,000 intel­lec­tuals to map their mobility pat­terns in order to iden­tify the major cul­tural cen­ters on the two con­ti­nents over two millennia.
  • Semiramis

    Ancient History Encyclopedia
    18 Aug 2014 | 8:01 am
    Sammu-Ramat, more famously known as Semiramis, was the queen regent of the Assyrian Empire (reigned 811-806 BCE) who held the throne for her young son Adad Nirari III until he reached maturity. She is also known as Shammuramat or Sammuramat. She was the wife of Shamshi-Adad V (reigned 823-811 BCE) and, when he died, she assumed rule until Adad Nirari III came of age, at which time she passed the...
  • Cleopatra: portrait of a killer

    DisputedPast
    Jan Huisman
    3 Aug 2014 | 10:42 pm
    The legendary Cleopatra is mostly known for her relation with the two most powerfull men of her day: Mark Anthony and Julius Caesar. Cleapatra was known for her cunning and seductive power, but this documentary shows a completey different side of this Greek pharaoh. British historian Neil Oliver takes you... Read More →
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    History in the Headlines

  • The British Burn Washington, D.C., 200 Years Ago

    Jesse Greenspan
    22 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Burning of the White House, 1814 (Credit: White House Association) When the War of 1812 first broke out, the fighting centered on the border between the United States and Canada, then a British colony. Before long, however, other fronts had opened up, including the Chesapeake Bay, where a British squadron led by Rear Admiral George Cockburn spent much of 1813 terrorizing coastal communities. After spending the winter in Bermuda with his troops, the brash-talking Cockburn returned in February 1814 with his eyes set on Washington, D.C., telling a superior that the city “might be possessed…
  • New Study Suggests Neanderthals and Humans Co-Existed for Millennia

    Sarah Pruitt
    21 Aug 2014 | 12:01 pm
    Reproduction of a Neanderthal woman at the National Archaeological Museum in Madrid, Spain. (Credit: Cristina Arias/Cover/Getty Images) Previous attempts to date Neanderthal remains, in the hopes of building a chronology of their interaction with humans and their eventual extinction, have yielded uncertain results. According to some of these findings, modern humans and Neanderthals coexisted for as little as 500 years, spurring theories that humans may have either slaughtered their predecessors or passed on deadly diseases that Neanderthals were unable to resist. In the new study, an…
  • The Last Days of the Passenger Pigeon, 100 Years Ago

    Christopher Klein
    20 Aug 2014 | 10:38 am
    Martha, the last passenger pigeon, being prepared for display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. (Credit: Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History) In the autumn of 1813, naturalist John James Audubon was journeying through the barrens of Kentucky when he heard a rumble from an approaching front on the northeast horizon. Within minutes, the sky had darkened, the temperature had plummeted and the thunderous roar had become deafening. This was no gale blowing in, however, but a massive storm of passenger pigeons so thick that the birds blotted out the sun,…
  • 8 Things You May Not Know About Augustus

    Jesse Greenspan
    19 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    1. Julius Caesar was his great-uncle and adopted father. Born on September 23, 63 B.C., Augustus grew up in a town about 25 miles southeast of Rome. His father was a senator (who died unexpectedly when he was four), and his mother was Caesar’s niece. As a child, Augustus presumably saw little to none of his famous great-uncle, who was out invading Gaul. Eventually, however, he gained Caesar’s trust and began spending more and more time with him, including during a military campaign in Spain. Thanks to his great-uncle, Augustus was able to join the patrician aristocracy, just one of many…
  • The Royal Diet of Richard III Revealed

    Sarah Pruitt
    18 Aug 2014 | 11:41 am
    Facial reconstruction of Richard III After reigning for only two years, Richard III was killed during the Battle of Bosworth Field in August 1485, becoming the last English king to die in combat. The defeat of Richard’s forces marked the end of the War of the Roses and enabled the rise of the first Tudor king, Henry VII. In order to cement his new standing, Henry and his allies did all they could to bad-mouth Richard. According to this Tudor-approved version of history–which endured for much of the last 500 years–the former duke of Gloucester was believed to have had his two…
 
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    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Thursday 22 August 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    22 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    To the Privy Seal, and sealed; so home at noon, and there took my wife by coach to my uncle Fenner’s, where there was both at his house and the Sessions, great deal of company, but poor entertainment, which I wonder at; and the house so hot, that my uncle Wight, my father and I were fain to go out, and stay at an alehouse awhile to cool ourselves. Then back again and to church, my father’s family being all in mourning, doing him the greatest honour, the world believing that he did give us it: so to church, and staid out the sermon, and then with my aunt Wight, my wife, and Pall…
  • Wednesday 21 August 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    21 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    This morning by appointment I went to my father, and after a morning draft he and I went to Dr. Williams, but he not within we went to Mrs. Terry, a daughter of Mr. Whately’s, who lately offered a proposal of her sister for a wife for my brother Tom, and with her we discoursed about and agreed to go to her mother this afternoon to speak with her, and in the meantime went to Will. Joyce’s and to an alehouse, and drank a good while together, he being very angry that his father Fenner will give him and his brother no more for mourning than their father did give him and my aunt at…
  • Tuesday 20 August 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    At the office in the morning and all the afternoon at home to put my papers in order. This day we come to some agreement with Sir R. Ford for his house to be added to the office to enlarge our quarters. Read the annotations
  • Monday 19 August 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    19 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    At the office all the morning; at noon the children are sent for by their mother my Lady Sandwich to dinner, and my wife goes along with them by coach, and she to my father’s and dines there, and from thence with them to see Mrs. Cordery, who do invite them before my father goes into the country, and thither I should have gone too but that I am sent for to the Privy Seal, and there I found a thing1 of my Lord Chancellor’s to be sealed this afternoon, and so I am forced to go to Worcester House, where severall Lords are met in Council this afternoon. And while I am waiting there,…
  • Sunday 18 August 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    18 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    (Lord’s day). To our own church in the morning and so home to dinner, where my father and Dr. Tom Pepys came to me to dine, and were very merry. After dinner I took my wife and Mr. Sidney to my Lady to see my Lord Hinchingbroke, who is now pretty well again, and sits up and walks about his chamber. So I went to White Hall, and there hear that my Lord General Monk continues very ill: so I went to la belle Pierce and sat with her; and then to walk in St. James’s Park, and saw great variety of fowl which I never saw before and so home. At night fell to read in “Hooker’s…
 
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    American Presidents Blog

  • John Quincy Adams, Executive Order of July 11, 1826

    M
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:43 am
    Most are aware that Thomas Jefferson and John Adams died on the same day (July 4th) in 1826. Needless to say, this coincidence on Independence Day got a lot of attention at the time. There were public honors from the military for both men.John Quincy Adams Administration issued an Executive Order on July 11, 1826 to elaborate on this.It noted, "A coincidence of circumstances so wonderful gives confidence to the belief that the patriotic efforts of these illustrious men were Heaven directed, and furnishes a new seal to the hope that the prosperity of these States is under the special…
  • Lincoln's Tomb in Springfield, IL

    M
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:12 pm
    I had the privilege of visiting Springfield, IL last week. I was able to stop by Lincoln's Tomb. It is a beautiful structure. Abraham Lincoln, his wife, and two of his sons are buried here. Thought I would share a picture of the tombstone.
  • US Presidents: Lists and Records

    M
    30 Jul 2014 | 12:34 pm
    I found an interesting Presidential website titled US Presidents: Lists and Records. The site describes itself as, "The presidents of the United States are so much fun. Understanding them helps us understand American history. We have compiled a series of lists about the presidents, and will be adding more as we think of new categories." Included are very useful items such as the 1995 historical ranking of 41 presidents conducted from Siena College, which Presidents were left-handed, the relative share of popular and Electoral College vote each president won, and regular and pocket vetoes…
  • John Adams on Sally Hemings Debate

    Jennie W
    23 Jun 2014 | 12:07 pm
    I’ve never paid that much attention to the Jefferson-Hemings debate.  I’m perfectly okay believing either side of the coin, honestly leaning more towards, yes, he did father those kids. The ins and outs of the relationship also haven’t greatly interested me either, as Jefferson was always clearly a slave owner and this is a typical issue of slave owners, one of the many reasons why slavery was a terrible institution.    I’m currently reading Passionate Sage by Joseph Ellis(incidentally the article I referenced above was written by Ellis as well….although I…
  • Skydiving for his 90th!

    Jennie W
    21 Jun 2014 | 5:36 pm
    So George HW Bush went skydiving for his 90th birthday!  Good for him!  Here's a bit of backstory to go with this:Mr. Bush said his first experience skydiving was leaving his plane during World War II when his engine caught fire and waiting for hours to be picked up out of the ocean.“I did it wrong, I pulled the jump cord too early and hit the tail of the plane,” he said. “I decided later on that I wanted to do it right. That did spark my interest in making another jump.”Mr. Bush said he often thinks about the two other men in the plane with him, both of whom died, and why…
 
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    History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

  • August 22, 1950: Althea Gibson becomes first African-American on U.S. tennis tour

    21 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    On this day in 1950, officials of the United States Lawn Tennis Association (USLTA) accept Althea Gibson into their annual championship at Forest Hills, New York, making her the first African-American player to compete in a U.S. national tennis competition. Growing up in Harlem, the young Gibson was a natural athlete. She started playing tennis at the age of 14 and the very next year won her first tournament, the New York State girls' championship, sponsored by the American Tennis Association (ATA), which was organized in 1916 by black players as an alternative to the exclusively white USLTA.
 
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    The New York History Blog

  • New Book: A Dictionary Of Vietnam War Slang

    Editorial Staff
    22 Aug 2014 | 3:00 pm
    On August 7th, the US marked the 50th anniversary of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, the basis for the Johnson administration’s escalation of American military involvement in Southeast Asia and war against North Vietnam. A new book, Vietnam War Slang: A Dictionary on Historical Principles (Routledge, 2014) by Tom Dalzell, outlines the context behind the […]
  • This Week’s New York History Web Highlights

    Editorial Staff
    22 Aug 2014 | 11:53 am
    Alexander Lamberton:Old Forge Pioneer And Nature Preservationist Up All Night at the Museum of Natural History Gallery Photography: Blame the Crowd, Not the Camera Smithsonian Volunteer Transcription Project Genealogy: 1861 Canada Census Update Education: Michelle Rhee’s Real Legacy John Warren On ‘The Historians’ (WVTL Radio) Juan: New York’s First Immigrant Dave Ruch: Remembering Ermina Pincombe […]
  • ADK 46er History Doc Being Shown In Elizabethtown

    Editorial Staff
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:00 am
    The Adirondack History Center will conclude its summer lecture series with a showing of the documentary The Mountains Will Wait for You at 7 pm on Tuesday evening, August 26 at the museum in Elizabethtown, NY. The film tells the story of the first woman to climb the 46 High Peaks and a founder of […]
  • This Week’s Top New York History News

    Editorial Staff
    22 Aug 2014 | 5:59 am
    1614 Albany Fort Location Suggested Smithsonian Lanches Transcription Website Vandalism at Whitney Museum of Art Fire Claims Thousand Island Landmark Lake George Battleground Dig Concludes No Exec Yet For St. Law Historical Hotel Saranac Restoration Underway New Livingston Manuscript On Exhibit Old Stone Barracks Campaign Launched NPS Issues Heritage Tourism Report Follow The New York […]
  • Researcher Pinpoints 1614 Albany Fort Location

    Editorial Staff
    21 Aug 2014 | 1:00 pm
    A local historian believes he has pinpointed the exact location of a 1614 colonial fort in Albany. “Fort Nassau” was North America’s oldest Dutch trading house, built in 1614 near the present-day Port of Albany. But the precise location of the ruined structure has been largely forgotten over time as the natural and built environment […]
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    History Is Elementary

  • Yes, I've Published a Book!

    18 Aug 2014 | 5:53 pm
    I've written and published a book!Of course, that was my intention when I began this blog way back in 2006 when I was still in the classroom, but the book I've published isn't exactly the book I had planned. The planned project - a teaching memoir - will still be published along with a few other projects, but the book you see to the left is what fell in my lap along the way.It needed to be done. History education is my prime focus along with writing curriculum. Over the last couple of years I've written a few college courses used by teacher candidates at Johns Hopkins University School of…
  • Getting to the Tooth of the Matter

    23 Jan 2014 | 6:51 am
     Do you know what these are?If you guessed dental tools you would be correct?Now, who owned them?None other than America’s silversmith and favorite son of Liberty who rode the countryside warning the folks that the British were coming.  No…not William Dawes, but that other one.  Yes, old what’s his name?Yes!  Paul Revere!Following the French and Indian War the economy in the colonies had been what is described by some today as an economic downturn. Actually, folks were really hurting financially. Not only did the colonies take a hit with the French and Indian War…
  • Frank Carpenter: World Traveler and Photographer

    16 Jan 2014 | 11:39 am
    Over on the Facebook page for this blog I’ve been posting a series of pictures this week I’ve simply sourced as “Library of Congress”, but the source goes much deeper than that.  The pictures are wonderful depictions of world scenes beginning in the 1890s through the 1930s. I’ve featured some here.The collection was put together by Frank and Frances Carpenter, a father-daughter team, during their world travels. The photos were used to illustrate his writings regarding travel and his world geography textbooks. I love to snap pictures myself. Over the last five years I’ve taken…
  • 5 Ways to Keep Your Alumni Base Lively

    21 Nov 2013 | 8:44 am
    Great advice for folks who control alumni groups!! Via: iContact
  • Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep....An Old Spin

    12 Sep 2013 | 9:06 am
    This past February Mr. Elementaryhistoryteacher and I ran off for a quick weekend in Charleston. It was rainy and cold most of the time, so we didn't get a chance to walk around very much, but we did take a turn through the visitor's center and then headed across the street to The Charleston Museum. The museum was founded in 1773 and is commonly referred to as America's first museum.While I found all of the exhibits informative and well done, one of the smaller ones simply astonished me.I love learning new things, and these types of cemetery markers were TOTALLY new to me.Yes, that's…
 
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    O Say Can You See?

  • A nation of savers: The impulse to connect with history through objects, buildings, and sites

    NMAH
    21 Aug 2014 | 1:15 am
    Intrigued by a piece of charred wood in the museum's First Ladies exhibition, intern Auni Gelles explores the story behind this slice of timber as it relates to the history of both the national museum and the historic preservation movement. Two experts discuss how Americans' long-standing impulse to collect bits of history simultaneously damaged and preserved many of our national treasures. When British troops marched into Washington, D.C. during the War of 1812, 200 years ago on August 24, they set off a shockwave of fear by burning iconic symbols of the young capital city: the…
  • Spinsters, confirmed bachelors, and LGBTQ collecting

    NMAH
    19 Aug 2014 | 5:45 am
    As objects representing Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning history enter the museum's collection today, Curator Katherine Ott reflects on collecting and interpreting LBGTQ material culture. Can an object be gay? A queer question and one that is endlessly interesting for museums. Objects are not gay any more than they can be Klingon, a Free-Soil Party member, or jealous. However, most museums have materials created by LGBTQ people and the range of historical versions of that identity, whether they know it or not. When it comes to groups that have been…
  • Cooking in D.C. with Julia Child

    NMAH
    15 Aug 2014 | 1:30 am
    Fans and friends of Julia Child will pause today, as they do every year on August 15, to remember the beloved icon of American culinary history on her birthday. Although it's been 10 years since her passing, Julia is well remembered for her achievements as a gifted cookbook author, a marvelously entertaining television cook, and an inspirational teacher, mentor, and friend. This post by Curator Paula Johnson recalls Julia's interest in bringing a new generation of cooks into the kitchen. Julia Child with Washington, D.C., public school students. Photograph courtesy of Linda White.
  • It's your birthday, Panama Canal!

    NMAH
    14 Aug 2014 | 12:15 am
    By Curator Paul F. Johnston On August 15, 1914, the Panama Canal officially opened for business with the passage of the American steamship SS Ancon, which had been acquired by the Panama Railroad Company to haul freight. The canal sliced nearly 8,000 miles off the Cape Horn route through much safer waters, and it was an immediate hit with the world's shippers at the dawn of the First World War. The steamship SS "Ancon" was the first ship to traverse the Panama Canal on August 15, 1914. From the museum's Maritime Ralph E. Cropley Collection. Before World War I, all…
  • Lake life and the living's easy

    NMAH
    8 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    One hundred and sixty years ago on August 9, 1854, Henry David Thoreau published Walden, a transcendental tribute to solitude, simplicity, and lakeside living. While some staff enjoy vacations with lakeside views and a good read, those of us at our desks sometimes browse the collection for objects that remind us of warm breezes and sunny days on the sand. If you're in the same boat, check out these lake-related collections objects gathered by Curatorial Assistant Mallory Warner.  Lithograph, "Kay's Park on Lake Geneva," Wisconsin, by C.H. Radcliff…
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    Toptenz.net

  • 10 Disturbing Facts About Foods You Eat Every Day

    Mike Brown
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:10 pm
    You’re bound to read at least one news article about food a day, and that article will probably either be about how a food is now considered bad for you or how a formally bad food is now considered good. But there are so many food facts out there that more often than not it’s […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Disturbing Facts About Foods You Eat Every Day appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Top 10 Wonder Women of Business

    Mike Brown
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:10 pm
    Women certainly have an uphill battle when competing against men and other women in the workplace. They face sexism, bias—not to mention having to deal with lots of guys who have mother issues on a daily basis. However, despite the fact that media sometimes buries these amazing true-life stories, the truth of their accomplishments cannot […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post Top 10 Wonder Women of Business appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Doctors Told Jack Lalanne That Exercise was Bad For You

    Karl Smallwood
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:02 pm
    Jack Lalanne was probably the fittest human being to have ever lived, he was so fit it is now commonly believed that The post Doctors Told Jack Lalanne That Exercise was Bad For You appeared first on Fact Fiend.   Source: Toptenz.net The post Doctors Told Jack Lalanne That Exercise was Bad For You appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Times One Side REALLY Creamed the Other Side (Lopsided Victories)

    Daniel Zarzeczny
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:01 pm
    A Brief History On August 22, 2007, the Texas Rangers beat the Baltimore Orioles with a score of 30-3, the most runs ever scored by a major league baseball team in the modern era.  Sometimes it just happens that one side has all the might or all the luck and really gives it to the other side. Continue reading... The post 10 Times One Side REALLY Creamed the Other Side (Lopsided Victories) appeared first on Cracked History.   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Times One Side REALLY Creamed the Other Side (Lopsided Victories) appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Leni Riefenstahl: Nazi-Propaganda Queen

    Beth Michaels
    21 Aug 2014 | 9:01 pm
    A Brief History On August 22nd, 1902, Helene “Leni” Riefenstahl was born in Berlin, Germany.  Thirty years later she would meet Adolf Hitler, the man who helped her become the greatest female filmmaker of the 20th century, but that association would nearly destroy her as well. Digging Deeper A talented teenager, Leni (pronounced “Lay-Nee”) was enrolledContinue reading... The post Leni Riefenstahl: Nazi-Propaganda Queen appeared first on Cracked History.   Source: Toptenz.net The post Leni Riefenstahl: Nazi-Propaganda Queen appeared first on Toptenz.net.
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    History Of Macedonia

  • ΥΠΠΟΑ : Ακριβές περιεχόμενο δήλωσης της εφόρου κ. Αικ. Περιστέρη

    Stern
    22 Aug 2014 | 6:55 am
    Επειδή ανακριβή δημοσιεύματα φέρουν την κ. Αικ. Περιστέρη, προϊσταμένη της ΚΗ Εφορεία Προϊστορικών και Κλασσικών Αρχαιοτήτων που διεξάγει την ανασκαφή στον Τύμβο Καστά στην Αμφίπολη να έχει κάνει δηλώσεις για το ενδεχόμενο σύλησης του περιεχομένου του τάφου, η ίδια διευκρινίζει ότι η δήλωσή της έχει ακριβώς ως εξής: « Η…
  • Visit Macedonia:Dion,Vergina,Pella

    Stern
    22 Aug 2014 | 4:03 am
    A unique triangle of history and civilization in the heart of Macedonia: Dion, the sacred city of the Macedonians. Vergina, the first capital, the necropolis with the global radiation. Pella, the brilliant Hellenistic capital.   Vi Aprogrammatista     Ένα μοναδικό τρίγωνο ιστορίας και πολιτισμού στην καρδιά της Μακεδονίας: Δίον, η ιερή πόλη των Μακεδόνων. Βεργίνα, η πρώτη πρωτεύουσα, η […] Related posts: Dion – Pella – Vergina : The Heart of Macedonia…
  • ΥΠΠΟΑ : Συνέχιση ανασκαφικών εργασιών στον Τύμβο Καστά στην Αμφίπολη

    Stern
    21 Aug 2014 | 12:22 am
    Συνεχίζονται από την ΚΗ Εφορεία Προϊστορικών κα Κλασικών Αρχαιοτήτων οι ανασκαφικές εργασίες στον Τύμβο Καστά, στην Αμφίπολη. Με την αφαίρεση, μέχρι στιγμής, των έντεκα λίθων από τον τοίχο σφράγισης, αποκαλύφθηκαν εξ ολοκλήρου οι Σφίγγες από μάρμαρο Θάσου. Το ύψος των αγαλμάτων είναι 1.45 μ. Το συνολικό ύψος με τις κεφαλές…
  • Αμφίπολη: Η «καρδιά» του τύμβου μπορεί να κρύβει απείραχτα μνημεία

    Stern
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:27 pm
    της ΓΙΩΤΑΣ ΣΥΚΚΑ «Δεν μπορεί ένας τέτοιος τύμβος να κρύβει μόνο έναν τάφο». Είναι η πρώτη κουβέντα του αρχαιολόγου Πέτρου Θέμελη, δάσκαλου πολλών γενεών αρχαιολόγων, που έχει κάνει θαύματα με τις ανασκαφές του στην αρχαία Μεσσήνη. Και αν τώρα μίλησε στην «Κ» για τις έρευνες στην Αμφίπολη και την αποκάλυψη του μακεδονικού…
  • Αιγές : Μια μέρα με την Αγγελική Κοτταρίδη

    Stern
    19 Aug 2014 | 12:28 pm
    Aegae , AR Stater, circa 500-480 BC   Μια μέρα, με την Αγγελική Κοτταρίδη, τη σπουδαία αρχαιολόγο της οποίας το όνομα έχει συνδεθεί με την ιστορικό τούτο τόπο. Related posts: Ο Σκοπιανός Τύπος με μια Ματιά 20-3-2012 O Σκοπιανός Τύπος με μια ματιά 5-3-2012
 
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    Claire Gebben

  • How about that Cyndi

    clairegebben
    18 Aug 2014 | 3:21 pm
    The first time I attended a genealogy class taught by Sarah Little I heard about Cyndi’s list. On Sarah’s handout, my teacher noted the site is the most comprehensive reference on the web for genealogy, “the best of them all. A phenomenal encyclopedic site.” Amazingly, Cyndi has now kept Cyndislist.com continuously updated for 18 years. It has a categorized index to over 327,000 online genealogy resources. I’ve used Cyndislist.com to find immigrant ship passenger lists, links to German genealogy sites, Palatine genealogy sites, and genealogy resources by state.
  • A new day in history

    clairegebben
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:15 pm
    Once upon a time, before I really started researching 19th century history, I lumped the entire 19th century into the Victorian era, all about propriety and manners, dominated by “prudish, hypocritical, stuffy, [and] narrow-minded” cultural attitudes (Murfin and Ray 496). While two-thirds of the 19th century did fall within Queen Victoria’s reign in England (1837-1901), I now know the Victorian America preoccupation involved mainly New England and the Deep South. Most American citizens weren’t about establishing high society. They were on the move, focused on…
  • Civil War POWs

    clairegebben
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:59 am
    In the current July/August “Echoes,” published by the Ohio Historical Society, I was delighted to find a piece about the Union Army POW camp Johnson’s Island (located in Sandusky Bay just to the south of Lake Erie). I don’t remember how I happened on the existence of the Johnson’s Island camp in my research for The Last of the Blacksmiths, but I remember thinking how spotty the information seemed. Now, the “Echoes” magazine notes, there’s a new exhibit called “Privy to History” about the Johnson’s Island Civil War Prison at…
  • Homestead Digitization Project

    clairegebben
    3 Jul 2014 | 9:17 am
    Breaking news for genealogists and family history researchers. Files detailing Nebraska’s homesteading history have been digitized and are now available to the public. The milestone’s part of a larger effort by the Homestead Digitization Project to put all homesteading documents from around the U.S. online. For more on the subject, Robert Siegel speaks with historian Blake Bell from the Homestead National Monument in Beatrice, Neb. Link to interview on NPR The post Homestead Digitization Project appeared first on Claire Gebben.
  • Buffalo robes

    clairegebben
    17 Jun 2014 | 12:39 pm
    I first included buffalo robes in the novel The Last of the Blacksmiths because it was something my grandmother used to mention when she described sleigh rides. I didn’t really know what they were like — after all, buffalo robes are not an everyday object now like they once were in the 1800′s. Then again, there’s always Wikipedia. “From the 1840s to the 1870s the great demand for buffalo robes in the commercial centres of Montreal, New York, St. Paul and St. Louis was a major factor that led to the near extinction of the species. The robes were used as blankets…
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    Ancient Origins

  • The Lioness of Brittany and her Black Fleet of Pirates

    aprilholloway
    22 Aug 2014 | 6:33 am
    In the midst of the Hundred Years War between England and France, an enraged French woman named Jeanne de Clisson took to the sea with a fleet of warships, where she mercilessly hunted down ships of King Philip VI to avenge her husband’s death. For her ferocity, she eventually acquired the name The Lioness of Brittany. Jeanne and her crew would slaughter the crew of the King’s ships, leaving two or three sailors alive, so that the message would get back to the King that the Lioness of Brittany had struck once again. Jeanne de Clisson was born into an affluent French family in 1300 and…
  • Sphinxes Revealed in Newly-Discovered Ancient Greek Tomb

    aprilholloway
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:58 pm
    Last week we reported on the incredible discovery of a vast ancient tomb in Greece guarded by two sphinxes, adorned with frescoed walls, and surrounded by a nearly 500-metre long wall carved from marble. Now, after removing large stones from the outer seal, the two headless guardian sphinxes have been revealed in all their splendour, and bit by bit, the grand tomb is revealing the secrets that have lain hidden for 2,300 years. The unique burial monument, which dates from 325 to 300 BC, is located on Kasta Hill, in the region of Macedonia about 100km northeast of Thessaloniki. It is the…
  • The Ancient Origins of Some Dead or Dying Languages

    ancient-origins
    21 Aug 2014 | 3:21 pm
    Language is said to be the key to understanding a culture—the medium by which the arts and ideas of a people have been passed down over generations. Many languages are dying in the modern world, Read moreSection: Human OriginsFolklore
  • Kamikaze – The Divine Winds that Saved Japan

    aprilholloway
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:17 am
    During the 13th century, the Mongols, led by Kublai Khan, grandson of Genghis Khan, attempted two major invasions of Japan in 1274 and 1281 AD. However, on both occasions, a massive typhoon (tropical cyclone) obliterated the Mongol fleet, forcing the attackers to abandon their plans and fortuitously saving Japan from foreign conquest. The Japanese believed the typhoons had been sent from the gods to protect them from their enemies and called them Kamikaze (‘divine wind’). Following the conquest of China in 1230 and Korea in 1231, Kublai Khan become the first emperor of Mongolia and…
  • Fierce scientific debate has erupted over identity of Hobbit species

    aprilholloway
    20 Aug 2014 | 6:25 pm
    A heated international dispute has erupted over the publication of a paper earlier this month claiming that the tiny skeleton of an adult from Indonesia’s Flores island was a modern human with Down’s syndrome and not an ancient ‘hobbit’ species, according to a report in The Guardian. In October 2004, excavation of fragmentary skeletal remains from the island of Flores in Indonesia yielded what was called ‘the most important find in human evolution for 100 years.’ Its discoverers dubbed the find Homo floresiensis, a name suggesting a previously unknown species, dated to have lived…
 
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    DisputedPast

  • Two ancient Maya cities found in the Mexican jungle

    Jan Huisman
    19 Aug 2014 | 5:06 am
    A spectacular found in the southeastern part of Mexico, in the heart of the Yucatan peninsula. Archaeologists have unearthed two ancient Maya cities hidden in thick vegetation as they were exploring the area around Chactun, a large Maya city discovered in 2013. A remarkable facade with the open jaws of... Read More →
  • Greek archaeologists find a tomb from Alexander’s age

    Jan Huisman
    12 Aug 2014 | 12:17 pm
    Archaeologists from the Greek city of Amphipolis have found an ancient tomb that dates from the late reign of Alexander the Great or the early Hellenistic period, somewhere between 350 and 300 BC. The finding was revealed to today by Greece’s prime minister, underlining its great importance. In a statement, the prime... Read More →
  • Modern civilization started as men became more feminine

    Jan Huisman
    7 Aug 2014 | 12:02 pm
    New research suggests a decrease of testosterone was pivotal for the advance of  human civilization. After measuring more than 1,400 human skulls,  the changing shape of the male features show a drastic drop of male testosterone levels. This sudden drop coincided with what historians call ‘the great leap forward of Mankind’, a period... Read More →
  • Cleopatra: portrait of a killer

    Jan Huisman
    3 Aug 2014 | 10:42 pm
    The legendary Cleopatra is mostly known for her relation with the two most powerfull men of her day: Mark Anthony and Julius Caesar. Cleapatra was known for her cunning and seductive power, but this documentary shows a completey different side of this Greek pharaoh. British historian Neil Oliver takes you... Read More →
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    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • The Mutual Destruction of Sennacherib and Babylon

    22 Aug 2014 | 12:45 pm
    The reign of Assyrian king Sennacherib (705-681 BCE) was chiefly characterized by his difficulties with Babylon. Throughout the history of the Assyrian Empire, Babylon had caused problems and had even been destroyed by the Assyrian king Tukulti-Ninurta I in c. 1225 BCE. Even so, there were direct cultural bonds between Babylon and Ashur, capital of the Assyrian Empire, and the city was always re-built...
  • Moche Civilization

    20 Aug 2014 | 5:27 am
    The Moche civilization (also known as the Mochica) flourished along the northern coast and valleys of ancient Peru, in particular, in the Chicama and Trujillo Valleys, between 1 CE and 800 CE. The Moche state spread to eventually cover an area from the Huarmey Valley in the south to the Piura Valley in the north, and they even extended their influence as far afield as the Chincha Islands. Moche territory...
  • Ten Noble and Notorious Women of Ancient Greece

    19 Aug 2014 | 7:07 pm
    There were, no doubt, many notable women in ancient Greece, but history books are usually silent on female accomplishments. According to the historian and novelist Helena P. Schrader, this is because, "Herodotus and other ancient Greek historians are far more likely to mention Persian queens than the wives of Greeks – not because Persian women were more powerful than their Greek counterparts...
  • Semiramis

    18 Aug 2014 | 8:01 am
    Sammu-Ramat, more famously known as Semiramis, was the queen regent of the Assyrian Empire (reigned 811-806 BCE) who held the throne for her young son Adad Nirari III until he reached maturity. She is also known as Shammuramat or Sammuramat. She was the wife of Shamshi-Adad V (reigned 823-811 BCE) and, when he died, she assumed rule until Adad Nirari III came of age, at which time she passed the...
  • The Aeneid

    17 Aug 2014 | 12:55 pm
    The Aeneid, written by the Roman poet Virgil, is a twelve-book-long epic poem that describes the early mythology of the founding of Rome. The eponymous hero Aeneas, a Trojan prince and son of Venus, faces trials and tribulations as he escapes Troy as it burns and sails the Mediterranean searching for a new home. Virgil spent the last ten years of his life (70-19...
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    AncientHistoryListsAncientHistoryLists

  • Top 10 most popular ancient Egyptian food

    Saugat Adhikari
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:02 pm
    The ancient world of Egypt was known for it’s prodigious culture, the ever standing pyramids and the sphinx, the Pharaohs and the once a majestic civilization that resided by the banks of the river Nile. And when it comes to the what culinary habits of the people in ancient Egypt, it is doubtless that they ate much better than people in any other ancient civilization of the world, even more so if the same timeline is considered for comparison. Much of the information about what the ancient Egyptians ate and drank comes from pictures on tomb walls, offering trays and foods left in the tombs,…
  • Top 10 most worshipped Ancient Egyptian Gods

    Saugat Adhikari
    10 Aug 2014 | 11:28 pm
    Civilization in Egypt holds many facts which are hidden within themselves and are never revealed. The great land along the banks of Nile has been extraordinarily mentioned in the modern as well as the ancient history. Around 3100BC, after the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pharaoh was the supreme for the rituals which were carried out. Egyptian deities were worshipped by the people and were considered as the form of nature that they should not make angry. So what were these natural forms which the population of ancient Egypt used to worship and offer their prayers. Lets’…
  • Top 10 religion practices in the ancient Rome

    Saugat Adhikari
    7 Aug 2014 | 6:21 pm
    Roman religion was followed from municipal to the individual family. Festival and Ritual were commonly practice and were taken as the occasion of great merriment. Roman had the religion of their own. The general celebration of different festivals were on the farms of the ancient Rome, which is also known as the Farmers year. Every Roman house contains the sacred file, with a belief that the lit fire will protect their family. However when the fire went out, it was believed that something terrible will happen in the family. Romans had their own gods; Jupiter (Zeus), Juno (Hera), and Minerva…
  • Top 10 important People in Ancient Greece

    Saugat Adhikari
    5 Aug 2014 | 10:15 pm
    Ancient Greece has been one of the greatest civilization to have ever flourished ever since the advent of humans. It had an enormous impact on the subsequent cultures that arose following the fall of the ancient Greeks. When we are talking about the rich history of ancient Greece, it can never be complete without bringing in some of the most famous Greek personalities who have had significant impact then and now. From creating the first of the works in literature, to commencing huge events like the ancient Olympics, to ground-breaking theories and experimentations in mathematics and science,…
  • Top 10 famous people in ancient Rome

    Saugat Adhikari
    29 Jul 2014 | 7:45 pm
    There was a time, when the Roman Empire boasted the most extensive political and social structure in the history of western civilization. At the peak of its empire in the first and second centuries AD, ancient Rome covered 6.5 million square kilometers of land. The number of inhabitants estimated around 50 to 90 million. Among these inhabitants, time and again, some of the most popular Romans came in the lime light at different ages. Ancient Rome gave rise to famous personalities like Julius Caesar, Cicero, Augustus and many more – Romans that are still remembered. But, it also saw the…
 
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