History

  • Most Topular Stories

  • In Short: The Punic wars: Rome vs. Carthage

    History Now
    26 Nov 2014 | 9:10 am
    In the struggle for power in the western Mediterranean, Carthage was a fierce opponent of Rome.Carthage was a naval and trading power in the north of Africa. The city of Carthage was founded by Phoenician sailors. Today Carthage is located in Tunisia near the capital Tunis. You can still visit the ancient sites.In the year 265 BC. Carthage controlled not only the West African coast but also part of southern Spain, Sardinia, Corsica and western Sicily.With the victory over Pyrrhus, Rome ruled over Italy and wanted now extend his rule. This lead to the three Punic wars.1. Punic War (264-241…
  • History of Christmas

    History Now
    25 Nov 2014 | 10:51 am
    One month from now people all over the world will celebrate Christmas, we all know what is celebrated, the birth of jesus,...but since when do we celebrate it?In the Middle Ages people have already celebrated Christmas. Soon after Jesus' death the first Christians emerged in Europe and they eventually started celebrating Christmas, in honour of the birth of Jesus Christ.Some of our modern Christmas traditions have their roots in the middle ages, some even long before that and some we adapted not long ago.As early as the 4th century, the Christian celebration was dated on the 25th of December.
  • Touched by Auschwitz

    Blog > WW2History.com
    laurence
    1 Nov 2014 | 11:13 am
    The BBC recently announced that my new film ‘Touched by Auschwitz’ will be broadcast in January 2015 as part of a season commemorating the liberation of Auschwitz 70 years ago. I’ll write more about the film – a 90 minute feature length documentary – once I know an exact transmission date. All I’ll say now is that it’s been the most astonishing privilege to travel around the world and film with so many survivors of Auschwitz and their families. Ever since I made the six part series ‘Auschwitz: the Nazis and the ‘Final Solution” ten…
  • The First Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

    History in the Headlines
    Christopher Klein
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    Credit: Pavel Kassin/Kommersant Photo via Getty Images As the United States prospered during the Roaring Twenties, so did New York City’s iconic department store—Macy’s. After going public in 1922, R. H. Macy & Co. started to acquire competitors and open regional locations. Macy’s flagship store in Manhattan’s Herald Square did such a brisk business that it expanded in 1924 to cover an entire city block stretching from Broadway to Seventh Avenue along 34th Street. To showcase the opening of the “World’s Largest Store” and its 1 million square feet of retail space at the…
  • Tuesday 26 November 1661

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys
    Samuel Pepys
    26 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    [Unfortunately the entry for today is missing from the Project Gutenberg text, which may mean it’s missing from the 1893 edition of the diary we’re using. I’ve taken the liberty of using the entry from the Latham & Matthews edition of the diary instead, for this day only. P.G.] Not well in the morning and lay long in bed. At last rise and at noon with my wife to my Uncle Wights, where we met Mr. Cole, Mr. Rawlinson, Norbury and his wife and her daughter, and other friends to the Chine of beef that I sent them the other day, and eat and were merry. By and by I am called…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    History in the Headlines

  • The First Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

    Christopher Klein
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    Credit: Pavel Kassin/Kommersant Photo via Getty Images As the United States prospered during the Roaring Twenties, so did New York City’s iconic department store—Macy’s. After going public in 1922, R. H. Macy & Co. started to acquire competitors and open regional locations. Macy’s flagship store in Manhattan’s Herald Square did such a brisk business that it expanded in 1924 to cover an entire city block stretching from Broadway to Seventh Avenue along 34th Street. To showcase the opening of the “World’s Largest Store” and its 1 million square feet of retail space at the…
  • A Brief History of the Presidential Turkey Pardon

    Christopher Klein
    25 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    Two hundred years after George Washington issued the first presidential proclamation of a day of public thanksgiving, President George H.W. Bush stepped before reporters, 30 schoolchildren and one antsy 50-pound turkey in the White House Rose Garden on November 17, 1989. The public presentation of a plump gobbler to the chief executive in the lead-up to Thanksgiving had been a time-honored photo op since the 1940s, but Bush would add a new presidential tradition of his own. After noting that the turkey appeared “understandably nervous,” Bush added: “Let me assure you, and this fine tom…
  • Famed “Lucy” Fossils Discovered in Ethiopia, 40 Years Ago

    Evan Andrews
    24 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    A sculptor's rendering of the hominid Australopithecus afarensis on display in 2007. (Credit: Dave Einsel/Getty Images) Dr. Donald Johanson woke up on the morning of November 24, 1974, feeling lucky. The paleoanthropologist—then a professor at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland—was several weeks into his third expedition to Hadar, Ethiopia, a site that had proven to be a treasure trove of early fossil remains. His international field team had already found leg bones and several jaws that were among the oldest examples of hominids—the family of bipedal primates that…
  • 10 Things You Should Know About Voltaire

    Evan Andrews
    21 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    Credit: Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images 1. The origins of his famous pen name are unclear. Voltaire had a strained relationship with his father, who discouraged his literary aspirations and tried to force him into a legal career. Possibly to show his rejection of his father’s values, he dropped his family name and adopted the nom de plume “Voltaire” upon completing his first play in 1718. Voltaire never explained the meaning of his pen name, so scholars can only speculate on its origins. The most popular theory maintains the name is an anagram of a certain Latinized…
  • Native American Activists Occupy Alcatraz Island, 45 Years Ago

    Evan Andrews
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 am
    Since the mid-1960s, American Indians had been on a mission to break into Alcatraz. After the famed prison shuttered its doors in 1963, Bay Area Native Americans began lobbying to have the island redeveloped as an Indian cultural center and school. Five Sioux even landed on Alcatraz in March 1964 and tried to seize it under an 1868 treaty that allowed Indians to appropriate surplus federal land. These early efforts all failed, but reclaiming “the Rock” became a rallying cry for Indians, many of whom viewed the island as a symbol of government indifference toward the indigenous population.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Tuesday 26 November 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    26 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    [Unfortunately the entry for today is missing from the Project Gutenberg text, which may mean it’s missing from the 1893 edition of the diary we’re using. I’ve taken the liberty of using the entry from the Latham & Matthews edition of the diary instead, for this day only. P.G.] Not well in the morning and lay long in bed. At last rise and at noon with my wife to my Uncle Wights, where we met Mr. Cole, Mr. Rawlinson, Norbury and his wife and her daughter, and other friends to the Chine of beef that I sent them the other day, and eat and were merry. By and by I am called…
  • Monday 25 November 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    25 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    To Westminster Hall in the morning with Captain Lambert, and there he did at the Dog give me and some other friends of his, his foy, he being to set sail to-day towards the Streights. Here we had oysters and good wine. Having this morning met in the Hall with Mr. Sanchy, we appointed to meet at the play this afternoon. At noon, at the rising of the House, I met with Sir W. Pen and Major General Massy, who I find by discourse to be a very ingenious man, and among other things a great master in the secresys of powder and fireworks, and another knight to dinner, at the Swan, in the Palace yard,…
  • Sunday 24 November 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    24 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    (Lord’s day). Up early, and by appointment to St. Clement lanes to church, and there to meet Captain Cocke, who had often commended Mr. Alsopp, their minister, to me, who is indeed an able man, but as all things else did not come up to my expectations. His text was that all good and perfect gifts are from above. Thence Cocke and I to the Sun tavern behind the Exchange, and there met with others that are come from the same church, and staid and drank and talked with them a little, and so broke up, and I to the Wardrobe and there dined, and staid all the afternoon with my Lady alone…
  • Saturday 23 November 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    23 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    To Westminster with my wife (she to her father’s), and about 10 o’clock back again home, and there I to the office a little, and thence by coach with Commissioner Pett to Cheapside to one Savill, a painter, who I intend shall do my picture and my wife’s. Thence I to dinner at the Wardrobe, and so home to the office, and there all the afternoon till night, and then both Sir Williams to my house, and in comes Captain Cock, and they to cards. By and by Sir W. Batten and Cock, after drinking a good deal of wine, went away, and Sir W. Pen staid with my wife and I to supper, very…
  • Friday 22 November 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    22 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Within all the morning, and at noon with my wife, by appointment to dinner at the Dolphin, where Sir W. Batten, and his lady and daughter Matt, and Captain Cocke and his lady, a German lady, but a very great beauty, and we dined together, at the spending of some wagers won and lost between him and I; and there we had the best musique and very good songs, and were very merry and danced, but I was most of all taken with Madam Cocke and her little boy, which in mirth his father had given to me. But after all our mirth comes a reckoning of 4l., besides 40s. to the musicians, which did trouble us,…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    History in the News

  • Memorial honours Maroon men who gave their life in service

    26 Nov 2014 | 9:45 pm
    IT IS more than 40 years since the names of those who lost their lives in World War I and World War II from the Maroona area were last on display to the public, but this has now been rectified with the unveiling of a new War Memorial at the Maroona Recreation Reserve. IT IS more than 40 years since the names of those who lost their lives in World War I and World War II from the Maroona area were last on display to the public, but this has now been rectified with the unveiling of a new War Memorial at the Maroona Recreation Reserve.
  • Lionsgate Founder Frank Giustra on Philanthropy: "I Don't Want to Be Another Rich, Dead Dude"

    26 Nov 2014 | 12:31 pm
    Lionsgate founder Frank Giustra is betting on good karma after receiving the Dalai Lama Humanitarian Award from the Tibetan spiritual leader. "I don't want to be another rich, dead dude," Giustra told a CTV morning news show in Vancouver after being honored for his philanthropy.
  • to Speak at FareStart on 12/8 About Bestselling Book ...

    26 Nov 2014 | 11:32 am
    Bill Clinton: Giving: How Each of Us Can Change the World In this bestselling and inspirational book, former U.S. President Bill Clinton features the work of Operation HOPE, and its founder, John Hope Bryant. Guruprasad Madhavan, Barbara Oakley, David Green, David Koon, Penny Low: Practicing Sustainability John Hope Bryant and his work around financial literacy, financial dignity and silver rights, operationalized through his Operation HOPE, is highlighted and featured in a chapter of this book authored by Bryant.
  • Politico Helps Right-Wing Echo Chamber Use Bill Cosby Allegations To Attack Hillary Clinton

    26 Nov 2014 | 7:23 am
    With a new editorial team recently in place , Politico has published a news article comparing multiple allegations of rape and assault against Bill Cosby to Bill Clinton, accompanied by a warning that its own false analogy could be politically damaging to Hillary Clinton. After making the comparison, Politico itself points out how it makes no sense.
  • Bill Clintona s incorrect Mexican statistic

    26 Nov 2014 | 4:13 am
    Former president Bill Clinton gives the keynote speech at the New Republic Centennial Gala Dinner on Nov. 19. Former president Bill Clinton loves to toss out facts and figures. This line, from his speech at the New Republic 100th anniversary gala, is apparently a favorite that has turned up in some of his other speeches .
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    American Presidents Blog

  • FDR Decides Thanksgiving

    Jennie W
    26 Nov 2014 | 6:22 pm
    Are you ready for Thanksgiving?  Here is a fun article talking about setting the date for Thanksgiving and the furor FDR created in 1939 when he set the date for Thanksgiving!American Thanksgiving is the fourth Thursday in November. Countless institutions depend on this date being predictable year in and year out: football teams planning their "Turkey Bowl" games, schools setting their vacation schedules, department stores deciding when to put up their Christmas decorations.But the Thanksgiving date wasn't always so reliable. For decades, the president got to decide when the holiday…
  • President Kennedy's Election: Vote Counting Fraud?

    Jennie W
    21 Nov 2014 | 12:07 am
    I bookmarked this article back during the election, but am just getting around to post it (much like my state on finally deciding important races....seriously, do we have a governor or senator yet? And yes, both were finally settled).   What was interesting about this article is that it mentioned some vote counting controversies that I didn't know about.  When I teach the 1960 election, I tend to really emphasis the use of media and how that changed the outcome, but the vote counting is interesting as most students automatically think of the 2000 election with…
  • Washington Facts

    Jennie W
    19 Nov 2014 | 10:36 pm
    So I don't know about you, but I knew most of these "forgotten" facts and I wouldn't even call them "forgotten," more ignored.  The one I didn't know was that Washington grew hemp!Like other farmers, Washington grew hemp as a cash crop, but it’s not what you think. The hemp wasn’t smoked for pleasure. It was used to make rope, paper, and other products. Washington also grew corn and wheat. He was actually quite an agricultural innovator; he introduced the concept of crop rotation. Washington, the farmer, introduced the mule to America when he bred donkeys from the King of Spain and…
  • Eisenhower on D-Day

    Jennie W
    9 Nov 2014 | 1:07 am
    This article asks the question of what did Eisenhower actually say to put D-Day into action.  Eisenhower himself didn't remember, and no one can seem to agree what he said. What would seem like it should have an historical send off really doesn't.  So what does this mean?  It comes down to Eisenhower's own character, according to this article:There is no memorable quote, in other words, because of Eisenhower's good old-fashioned Kansas modesty.  He did not have the kind of ego that spawns lofty sentiments for the press or posterity Ike was a plain speaker from the plains…
  • 7 Famous Presidential Pardons

    M
    8 Oct 2014 | 12:34 pm
    One of the powers of the American President is the ability to pardon anyone of any crime for almost any reason. Section Two, Clause on of the Constitution notes, "The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    History Net: Where History Comes Alive - World & US History Online

  • Did American Loyalists Aid the British in the War of 1812

    Gerald Swick
    26 Nov 2014 | 8:01 pm
    Dear Sir: This is not the first time I have asked you a question, I asked a question on Americans and the Philippine resistance which you answered, and I would like to thank you for that. Now I have a …
  • Daily Quiz for November 27, 2014

    HistoryNet Staff
    26 Nov 2014 | 4:01 pm
    This three-year-old horse was the first to win the US Triple Crown.
  • Daily Quiz for November 26, 2014

    HistoryNet Staff
    25 Nov 2014 | 4:01 pm
    This was Ulysses S. Grant’s actual first name.
  • Wild West - February 2015 - Table of Contents

    David Lauterborn
    25 Nov 2014 | 2:04 pm
    The February 2015 issue of Wild West features stories about Annie Oakley lawsuits targeting William Randolph Hearst, the death of gunslinger James Leavy, personal ads on the frontier West, stagecoach visionary John Butterfield and Lillian Smith, the California sharpshooter who transformed herself into Wenona, the Indian Princess.
  • Wild West Discussion - February 2015

    David Lauterborn
    25 Nov 2014 | 1:58 pm
    If you were able to attend Buffalo Bill's Wild West and take in just one attraction, what would it be: Annie Oakley shooting the ashes from husband Frank Butler's cigarette? Young sharpshooter Lillian Smith breaking glass balls with her .22? …
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    african american history - Google News

  • In Darren Wilson's Testimony, Familiar Themes About Black Men - KPBS

    26 Nov 2014 | 2:24 pm
    KPBSIn Darren Wilson's Testimony, Familiar Themes About Black MenKPBSMany observers, such as Slate's Jamelle Bouie and Vox's Lauren Williams, pointed out that Wilson's testimony has historical echoes of the "black brute" caricatures that portrayed black men as savage, destructive criminals. After the Civil War, many and more »
  • Oregon Black History sleuths want your help in finding homes, buildings and ... - OregonLive.com

    25 Nov 2014 | 8:12 am
    OregonLive.comOregon Black History sleuths want your help in finding homes, buildings and OregonLive.comKim Moreland most recently returned from Pendleton, where she was researching information the group had received about the "Triple Nickel," officially known as the 555th Battalion. It was an all-black Army airborne unit stationed at the Pendleton Army ...
  • For Met Museum, a Major Gift of Works by African-American Artists From the South - New York Times (blog)

    24 Nov 2014 | 8:03 am
    The Philadelphia TribuneFor Met Museum, a Major Gift of Works by African-American Artists From the SouthNew York Times (blog)“It embodies the profoundly deep and textured expression of the African-American experience during a complex time in this country's history and a landmark moment in the evolution of the Met,” Mr. Campbell said. The donation will give the Metropolitan Reception highlights major African-American exhibitThe Philadelphia TribuneThe Met Hit the Jackpot of African-American Artartnet NewsMetropolitan Museum of Art Receives Major Gift of Works by African American…
  • 'New Black Friday' encourages sharing of black history, memories - Kansas.com

    23 Nov 2014 | 4:34 pm
    Kansas.com'New Black Friday' encourages sharing of black history, memoriesKansas.comAt the same time, the organizers of a local history book are asking for help from Wichitans. The book will chronicle decades of life in Wichita and feature early African-American families, segregation, relationships with Lebanese and Hispanic
  • Fundraiser for African American Museums Riverside convention - Press-Enterprise

    23 Nov 2014 | 4:11 pm
    Press-EnterpriseFundraiser for African American Museums Riverside conventionPress-EnterpriseThe Association of African American Museums is holding its first national convention on the West Coast in 2016, and the group chose Riverside as its site. The Riverside African American Historical Society is holding a fundraiser Friday, Nov. 28 to help
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

  • November 27, 1095: Pope Urban II orders first Crusade

    26 Nov 2014 | 9:00 pm
    On November 27, 1095, Pope Urban II makes perhaps the most influential speech of the Middle Ages, giving rise to the Crusades by calling all Christians in Europe to war against Muslims in order to reclaim the Holy Land, with a cry of "Deus vult!" or "God wills it!" Born Odo of Lagery in 1042, Urban was a protege of the great reformer Pope Gregory VII. Like Gregory, he made internal reform his main focus, railing against simony (the selling of church offices) and other clerical abuses prevalent during the Middle Ages. Urban showed himself to be an adept and powerful cleric, and when he was…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The New York History Blog

  • St. Nicholas Day at Crailo Historic Site Dec 6th

    Editorial Staff
    26 Nov 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Crailo State Historic Site in the City of Rensselaer will host a St. Nicholas Day Open House on December 6, 2013 from 12:00 pm until 4:00 pm.  For the Dutch settlers of this region The Feast of St. Nicholas was a day of celebration with favorite food and treats. Children checked their shoes, left out […]
  • Unique Performance of ‘The Little Match Girl’ Set For Troy

    Editorial Staff
    26 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    On the evening of Saturday, December 6th, during the 58th Annual Holiday Greens Show at the Rensselaer County Historical Society, a special one-night-only performance will take place in the parlors of the historic Hart-Cluett House in downtown Troy. Inspired by the classic Hans Christian Anderson fairy tale The Little Match Girl, Troy–based musicians Katherine and […]
  • Christmas at the Fort Plain Museum Dec 6th

    Editorial Staff
    26 Nov 2014 | 7:00 am
    The Fort Plain Museum will be hosting its annual “Christmas at the Fort” event on Saturday December 6, 2014 from 10 am to 6 pm. The Museum will present the Grand Opening of their new exhibit “The Children’s Attic”, which features children’s toys used in the Fort Plain area c. 1770-1920 that have been donated […]
  • Plattsburgh Old Stone Barracks Plans Announced

    Editorial Staff
    25 Nov 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Friends of the Old Stone Barracks (FOSB) has announced the results of their request for proposals and a new life for Plattsburgh’s Old Stone Barracks. FOSB has come to an agreement with Terry Schmaltz and Mary Theresa Pearl, proprietors of Valcour Brewing Company, and will assign the contract to purchase the Old Stone Barracks to them.  Pearl is […]
  • Origins of ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas, Jingle Bells

    Editorial Staff
    25 Nov 2014 | 10:20 am
    The Waterford Historical Museum and Cultural Center is continuing its winter lecture series with a presentation by Sloane Bullough about the origins of the famed Christmas story, “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas”, and the well known carol, “Jingle Bells”. The poem was first published anonymously as “A Visit from St. Nicholas” in the Troy Sentinel […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Toptenz.net

  • 10 Bizarre Baby Customs From Around The World

    Paul Jongko
    26 Nov 2014 | 9:10 pm
    There are many traditions around the world that are interesting and fun, but there are also those that are downright bizarre and even a little cruel. You’d think customs involving babies would be the former, but we’ve found 10 particularly weird kinds of the latter. 10. Bathing Newborn Babies with Boiling Milk Karaha Pujan is […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Bizarre Baby Customs From Around The World appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Organisms That Can Survive Under Extreme Conditions

    Nic Arcadio
    25 Nov 2014 | 9:10 pm
    Some organisms just have the edge over others, with the ability to withstand extreme temperatures that others simply can’t. There are a lot of tough creatures out there, but these 10 are the absolute toughest. 10. Himalayan Jumping Spider An Asian goose has been seen flying as high as 6437 meters (21,120 feet), while the […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Organisms That Can Survive Under Extreme Conditions appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Famous People Who Almost Died Before Their Time

    Nolan Moore
    24 Nov 2014 | 9:10 pm
    Death comes for everyone, even the rich and famous, but sometimes it shows up a bit sooner than expected. On more than one occasion famous figures have found themselves face to face with the Grim Reaper. The ten people on this list outwitted Death and went on to alter the course of history… for a […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Famous People Who Almost Died Before Their Time appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    History Of Macedonia

  • Μπουτάρης: Οι Σκοπιανοί είναι Βούλγαροι, δεν υπάρχει μακεδονική γλώσσα

    Stern
    26 Nov 2014 | 12:50 am
    Στη Μελβούρνη βρίσκεται ο δήμαρχος της Θεσσαλονίκης, Γιάννης Μπουτάρης για τις εκδηλώσεις της 30ής επετείου της αδελφοποίησης των δυο πόλεων. «Όποια και αν είναι η λύση αυτή, θα είναι οδυνηρή, αλλά είναι η μόνη διέξοδος» είπε ο κ. Μπουτάρης, μιλώντας στην ομογενειακή εφημερίδα «Νέος Κόσμος». Ο ίδιος υπογράμμισε ότι η καταγωγή…
  • ΥΠΠΟΑ: Σημεία ενημέρωσης από την συνέντευξη του Υπουργού κ. Κ. Τασούλα στην Αμφίπολη

    Stern
    22 Nov 2014 | 8:00 am
    “Οι επισκέπτες δεν ξεπερνούσαν τα δάκτυλα του ενός χεριού ενώ τώρα είναι πάνω από 1000″. “Τώρα προέχει η γεωφυσική έρευνα και η συντήρηση των ευρημάτων”. ” Ο τάφος αποτελεί απαράμιλλο ταφικό μνημείο τόσο για την σημαντικότητα της ανασκαφής όσο για την δουλειά που έκανε η ανασκαφική ομάδα. Η παγκόσμια κοινή γνώμη…
  • πΓΔΜ: επιχειρεί να αξιοποιήσει το momentum

    Stern
    21 Nov 2014 | 2:19 am
    «Η θέση της Ελλάδας για μία ονομασία που θα ισχύει έναντι όλων (erga omnes) κρίνεται ως μη αποδεκτή, μη λογική και εκτός της βασικής αρχής περί σεβασμού του διεθνούς δικαίου» δήλωσε ο υπουργός Εξωτερικών της ΠΓΔΜ Νίκολα Πόποσκι, σχολιάζοντας σχετικές αναφορές του αντιπροέδρου της ελληνικής κυβέρνησης και υπουργού Εξωτερικών…
  • Μπλόκο του Κρατικού Θεάτρου Βορείου Ελλάδος στη FYROM

    Stern
    19 Nov 2014 | 2:25 am
    Φρένο στην προσπάθεια της FYROM να διεισδύσει στην Ένωση Θεάτρων της Ευρώπης με το όνομα Μακεδονία έβαλε ο Γιάννης Βούρος την περασμένη Κυριακή στο Ισραήλ. Ο καλλιτεχνικός διευθυντής του Κρατικού Θεάτρου Βορείου Ελλάδος ήταν παρών στη γενική συνέλευση της Ένωσης των Θεάτρων της Ευρώπης, η οποία πραγματοποιήθηκε στο Τελ Αβίβ.
  • ΥΜΑΘ : Συνέδριο για τους θεσμούς στην Μακεδονία των Ελληνιστικών χρόνων

    Stern
    16 Nov 2014 | 6:00 am
    Τη διεξαγωγή συνεδρίου με θέμα «Οι θεσμοί στην Μακεδονία κατά τους Ελληνιστικούς χρόνους», διοργανώνει στη Θεσσαλονίκη, το διάστημα 17-18 Ιανουαρίου του 2015, το υπουργείο Μακεδονίας και Θράκης, σε συνεργασία με τη Γενική Γραμματεία Διαφάνειας και Ανθρωπίνων Δικαιωμάτων του υπουργείου Δικαιοσύνης. Αυτό ανακοινώθηκε κατά τη…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Blog > WW2History.com

  • Touched by Auschwitz

    laurence
    1 Nov 2014 | 11:13 am
    The BBC recently announced that my new film ‘Touched by Auschwitz’ will be broadcast in January 2015 as part of a season commemorating the liberation of Auschwitz 70 years ago. I’ll write more about the film – a 90 minute feature length documentary – once I know an exact transmission date. All I’ll say now is that it’s been the most astonishing privilege to travel around the world and film with so many survivors of Auschwitz and their families. Ever since I made the six part series ‘Auschwitz: the Nazis and the ‘Final Solution” ten…
  • The forgotten D Day

    laurence
    22 Jun 2014 | 3:04 am
    In the wake of Operation Bagration, the towns and cities of Eastern Europe would be ‘liberated’ Today is the anniversary of one of the most monumental military operations in the history of the world. A gigantic series of battles that dwarfed D Day in scale. But unlike the anniversary of D Day a few weeks ago, you won’t see the world’s most powerful leaders gathering together to celebrate this particular military triumph for the Allies. And the reason why that’s the case is an important one. The Soviet Operation Bagration, which was launched overnight on the 21/22…
  • Hitler and Putin

    laurence
    4 Mar 2014 | 9:30 am
    Are there any parallels between Adolf Hitler and Vladimir Putin? History never repeats itself precisely. There can never be another individual exactly like Adolf Hitler. The same circumstances that caused WW2 can never occur again. And yet…. Vladimir Putin’s ‘justifications’ for the invasion of the Crimea – and for his right to invade the rest of Ukraine any time he wants – are eerily reminiscent of the same ludicrous ‘justifications’ Adolf Hitler uttered in the run up to WW2. In March 1938 Hitler said an invasion of Austria might be necessary…
  • The ghost of WW2 in Ukraine

    laurence
    26 Feb 2014 | 11:08 am
    As Ukrainians struggle forward they remember the past (The photo is of the entrance to a palace in Lviv). I’ve been traveling backwards and forwards to Ukraine for various WW2 related projects for many years, and so I’ve been particularly concerned about recent developments there. The sight of young people who are prepared to die under the much derided flag of the European Union must make us all think – or in some cases rethink – about the value of European integration. Given a choice between the values of the European Convention on Human Rights – freedom,…
  • The most important Allied conference of the war.

    laurence
    28 Nov 2013 | 6:34 am
    The ‘Big Three’ at Tehran Today is a hugely significant anniversary – but it’s also a largely unknown one amongst the general population. That’s because the only one of the Allied leadership conferences of WW2 that seems to have penetrated into popular culture is the final one (involving Churchill, Roosevelt and Stalin) held at Yalta in the Crimea in February 1945. But those people who know the history have long understood that in many ways all Yalta did was to rubber stamp a series of decisions that had already been taken at the first and most important of the…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Claire Gebben

  • Tis the season

    clairegebben
    14 Nov 2014 | 11:43 am
    Tis the season, right? The season of shorter days, candlelight, “peace on earth” ringing out in choral harmonies. Lois Brandt launches her book “Maddie’s Fridge” at Bellevue Bookstore in September.And, tis the season of holiday shopping madness. This year, I’m jumping in with both feet to support local independent book stores. On Saturday, November 29, it’s my privilege to join authors Janet Lee Carey, Robert Dugoni, Dana Sullivan, Samantha Vamos, Dan Richards, Kazu Kibuishi Justina Chen, Christina Dudley, and William Dietrich at Bellevue University…
  • Mysterious forces at work

    clairegebben
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:30 pm
    Many wonderful things occurred during my recent visit to Germany. For instance, this interview published in Die Rheinpfalz newspaper. Look, Mom, I speak perfect German! (not) The interviewer spoke English, naturally. She recorded our talk, then translated it into German. The photo she used was taken in the market square in the heart of the old town of Freinsheim. We sat on a bench just to the right for the interview. Still in Freinsheim a week later, I gave a book presentation on The Last of the Blacksmiths at the Altes Spital Cultural Center in Freinsheim to a full house — about 60…
  • Historic Frankfurt

    clairegebben
    14 Oct 2014 | 2:34 pm
    Early last Saturday, when in Frankfurt, Germany, my very kind host Mia asked me what I wanted to see. The Saturday market? The older, historic part of town? It had been a long week, and quite frankly, my brain wasn’t firing on all cylinders. It was my last day there. I’d just spent three days and very long hours browsing the huge, international Frankfurt Book Fair. Foremost in my mind now was locating the airport in time for my departure flight the next morning. So I shrugged. “Anything’s fine, whatever you think.” Mia hesitated, then suggested we visit the…
  • Roman ruins, grape harvest, and the devil’s stone

    clairegebben
    7 Oct 2014 | 5:19 am
    Freinsheim may be a small rural town, but during my visit there’s been so much going on I have trouble keeping up. Friday, Oct. 3 was German Unification Day (a celebration of the day East and West Germany re-united in 1989). It is a national holiday. My relatives all gathered in a terraced garden in the vineyard, in the shade around a massive stone table. Afterwards, we hiked to some Roman ruins — two of four sarcophagi discovered a few years ago in the fields, dating back to around 300 A.D. Unification Day brunch in the wine garden on the Musikantenbuckel Roman sarcophagi from…
  • Odd sights to a foreigner

    clairegebben
    3 Oct 2014 | 1:19 am
    St. Lubentiuskirche in the south of Limburg Spaghetti Ice Cream with chocolate and nuts (it has whipped cream in the center) Inscribed locks on a gate by the Lahn — a custom of lovers A guinea pig farm in Roedinghausen They smoke more often here — maybe it’s the cigarette machines. The post Odd sights to a foreigner appeared first on Claire Gebben.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ancient Origins

  • Imperial Office of the Tang Dynasty discovered at the ruins of Daming Palace

    lizleafloor
    26 Nov 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Excavations at the ruins of Daming, the “Palace of Great Brilliance”, have unearthed ancient offices which are thought to have been responsible for issuing imperial edicts, official communications of the Chinese Empire that had the force of law. The Daming Palace, considered a masterpiece in the history of Chinese architecture, was located in the ancient city of Chang'an – present-day Xi'an in Shaanxi Province, China, and was the seat of imperial court and political center of the empire during the Tang Dynasty, 618-907 A.D. It is now a national heritage site.Read…
  • Theodora: From humble beginnings to powerful empress who changed history

    dhwty
    26 Nov 2014 | 3:44 am
    It is often said that ‘behind every great man is an even greater woman’. Justinian I was one of the most powerful emperors of the Byzantine Empire. During his reign, he sought to revive the empire’s past glory, and was rather successful, as much of the lands once under Western Roman rule, including Italy and North Africa, came under Byzantine control. Justinian’s greatness was not restricted to military matters alone, as he instituted important judicial reforms, and was responsible for the re-building of the famous Hagia Sophia (the previous structure having been burnt to the ground…
  • The thirteen towers of Chankilla, Peru: ancient astronomical observation in the Americas

    Ivan Petricevic
    25 Nov 2014 | 4:58 pm
    Located in the Peruvian coastal desert at the Casma-Sechin Oasis, stands the incredible monumental complex of Chankillo, also known as Chanquillo, which extends across four square kilometers. The ancient archaeological site consists of a fort located on hilltop and thirteen solar observatory towers, as well as residential and gathering areas. It was occupied for a relatively short period of time – between the mid-fourth century BC and the early first century AD. Located between two observation platforms, the thirteen astronomical towers span the entire annual rising and setting arcs of the…
  • Researchers discover vast ancient gold mines in Spain, the largest of the Roman Empire

    lizleafloor
    25 Nov 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Complex hydraulic systems and the methods of ancient Roman gold mining have been discovered using sophisticated laser detection and aerial mapping over Las Médulas in northwestern Spain. Archaeologists have long thought that the Romans were mining for gold in Spain in the first century B.C., and researchers from the University of Salamanca have now located the vast ancient gold mines in the province of León, and hidden under Eria Valley vegetation and crops. The gold mine complex, known as Las Médulas, is believed to be the largest gold pit of the Roman empire. It featured channels and…
  • Epic Cosmic Battles and the Forces of Creation and Destruction in Belief Systems around the World

    dhwty
    25 Nov 2014 | 3:57 am
    Stories of epic cosmic battles can be found in many world cultures. In these battles, the lines are often drawn clearly, with the forces of good on one side and the forces of evil on the other. For some cultures, the cosmic battle began at the beginning of time, and is responsible for the order of things as they are in the present. On the other hand, there are also battles set in the future, events that have not come to pass, but which may materialize at some point in time.Read moreSection: NewsMyths & Legends
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    DisputedPast

  • Archaeologists unearth an unknown Roman god

    Jan Huisman
    26 Nov 2014 | 8:29 am
    Unknown Roman god (photo: Peter Jülich) A Roman sanctuary is found in an ancient temple in the southeast of Turkey with a depiction of a mysterious and unknown Roman god in it. On it, the god rises up from a plant and may be a fusion of Near Eastern and... Read full history →
  • History’s most unexpected veggies? The bloodthirsty Roman gladiators

    Jan Huisman
    9 Nov 2014 | 7:32 am
    According to popular belief, meat eaters are more aggressive and energetic than vegetarians . How is it then that some of the most brutal and aggressive warriors from history, Roman gladiators, ate mostly plants and grains? New research of the medical university of Vienna suggests just that. The researchers analyzed by... Read full history →
  • 17th-century Dutch shipwreck discovered

    Jan Huisman
    31 Oct 2014 | 1:13 pm
    March 3, 1677: The Dutch ship Huis de Kreuningen sunk in the southern Caribbean,during the Battle of Scarborough Harbour. The Dutch, who controlled the island of Tobago at the time, were attacked by the French. The battle was  significant, both in terms of the number of lives lost and the... Read full history →
  • Mosaic of Persephone discovered in ancient tomb

    Jan Huisman
    17 Oct 2014 | 4:25 am
    A stunning mosaic of Persephone is discovered at the site of the newly excavated Amphipolis tomb. Earlier this week (DisputedPast reported) images from the other part of the mosaic were released by the Greek ministry of Culture. The mosaic is now fully uncovered and it can be interpret as a whole.... Read full history →
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • 7 Stunning Roman Mosaics

    26 Nov 2014 | 9:04 am
    The following seven Roman mosaics are all currently on display in the Palazzo Massimo alle Terme National Museum, Rome. Mosaics were a common feature of Roman private homes and public buildings across the empire from Africa to Antioch. Mosaics, otherwise known as opus tesellatum, were made with small black, white, and coloured squares typically measuring between 0.5 and 1.5 cm, but fine details were...
  • Vandals

    25 Nov 2014 | 12:25 pm
    The Vandals were a Germanic tribe who are first mentioned in Roman history in the Natural History of Pliny the Elder (77 CE). The Roman historian Tacitus also mentions them in his Germania (c. 98 CE), though he also refers to them as the "Lugi". Their name may mean "the wanderers" and was given by both Pliny and Tacitus as "Vandilii". The name "vandal" has now become...
  • The Battle of Philippi 42 BCE

    25 Nov 2014 | 11:05 am
    The Battle of Philippi in 42 BCE was an all-Roman affair fought between the young Octavian, chosen heir of Julius Caesar, and the mercurial Mark Antony, widely regarded as the greatest living Roman general on the one side against Brutus and Cassius, the assassins of Caesar and champions of the Republican cause on the other. The battle, on an inland plain in eastern Macedonia near the city of Philippi...
  • Beauty in Ancient Greek Sculpture

    25 Nov 2014 | 1:21 am
    Greek sculpture from 800 to 300 BCE took early inspiration from Egyptian and Near Eastern monumental art, and over centuries evolved into a uniquely Greek vision of the art form. Greek artists would reach a peak of artistic excellence which captured the human form in a way never before seen and which was much copied. Greek sculptors were particularly concerned with proportion, poise, and the idealised perfection...
  • Visiting the Ancient City of Kish

    24 Nov 2014 | 12:55 am
    After visiting Babylon and Borsippa, I planned to visit the ancient city of Kish in modern-day Iraq. I had an obstacle; how to get there? It is not a typical site for tourists or the public. The site was an American military base for a few years after the US-led invasion in 2003. After they withdrew from the site, the Iraqi army prevented people from going there, because, simply, it is a target...
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    AncientHistoryLists » AncientHistoryLists

  • Top 10 oldest Art ever discovered

    Saugat Adhikari
    24 Nov 2014 | 6:59 am
    Art has been a part of expression since the evolution of the mankind. The discovery of pre-historic sculptures, cave art suggest that different form of arts were practiced throughout the evolution of mankind. Even though the way of expressing ideas through art was different at that time, it can be predicted that the way of expressing inner emotion through different form of art was existed through the evolution of mankind. It was initially believed that oldest art and partings existed mainly in the Europe. The discovery of the various cave art in Indonesia raised a new question among the…
  • 8 ancient greek painters

    Saugat Adhikari
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:03 pm
    Ancient Greece was one of the richest empire in Art in the ancient world. Their style and architect, was derived by other giant empire like Roman of that era. Sculpture and Architecture were widely popular back then. In Addition, Painting was widely practiced in Ancient Rome. The Greek painter inspired thousands of artists throughout the generation. Here is the list of 8 ancient Greek painters, which techniques and style were adopted throughout the generation. 8. Thales (painter) Often a place on a level with Pheidias and Apelles, Thales was an ancient Greek painter, who is mentioned…
  • 7 Ancient Roman Painters

    Saugat Adhikari
    19 Nov 2014 | 7:03 am
    Painting has always become the way of representing or showcasing different human emotions. The large discovery of the ancient paintings in cave, ancient royal palace, temple by archaeologist suggest that different form of art was quite popular since thousands of years ago . The discovery of the ancient art treasure like “Venus of Berekhat Ram” which was claimed to be of age 230,000 years old suggest that art such as painting was practiced throughout the evolution of the mankind. Unlike any other part of the ancient world, different form of arts is widely practiced in Ancient Rome.
  • Top 12 greatest ancient military commander

    Saugat Adhikari
    18 Nov 2014 | 5:45 am
    “The warrior doesn’t win the war by virtue along”.  Ancient military commander leads thousands of their men in the vicious battle and triumphed over their enemy. Their flourishes speech prior to the battle, inspired thousands of their men in the battlefield, which is still invoked by various historians. Ancient Warfare were completely different than modern warfare. Number of armies and their strength were the primary factor considered to win the war. Some of the ancient military commander confutes it by showing the inconceivable strategy and tactics in the battlefield that are still…
  • Top 10 biggest events of 2nd Punic war

    Saugat Adhikari
    26 Oct 2014 | 9:08 pm
    Ancient Rome and Carthage had a long history of conflicts that lasted for more than a century. All this tension culminated in a series of three wars fought between the two states from 264 BC to 146 BC. These wars were called the Punic wars. The second Punic war was fought from 218 BC to 201 BC and is most remembered for the huge battles fought between the Carthaginians under Hannibal and the Romans under different generals. Even though Hannibal’s army invaded Italy from the north and resoundingly defeated the Roman army in several battles, he could never achieve the ultimate goal of causing…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    History Now

  • In Short: The Punic wars: Rome vs. Carthage

    26 Nov 2014 | 9:10 am
    In the struggle for power in the western Mediterranean, Carthage was a fierce opponent of Rome.Carthage was a naval and trading power in the north of Africa. The city of Carthage was founded by Phoenician sailors. Today Carthage is located in Tunisia near the capital Tunis. You can still visit the ancient sites.In the year 265 BC. Carthage controlled not only the West African coast but also part of southern Spain, Sardinia, Corsica and western Sicily.With the victory over Pyrrhus, Rome ruled over Italy and wanted now extend his rule. This lead to the three Punic wars.1. Punic War (264-241…
  • History of Christmas

    25 Nov 2014 | 10:51 am
    One month from now people all over the world will celebrate Christmas, we all know what is celebrated, the birth of jesus,...but since when do we celebrate it?In the Middle Ages people have already celebrated Christmas. Soon after Jesus' death the first Christians emerged in Europe and they eventually started celebrating Christmas, in honour of the birth of Jesus Christ.Some of our modern Christmas traditions have their roots in the middle ages, some even long before that and some we adapted not long ago.As early as the 4th century, the Christian celebration was dated on the 25th of December.
  • 20 Incredible History Pictures pt.3

    23 Nov 2014 | 8:29 am
    1) German soldiers in world war I2) German WWI Cavalry (ca. 1918)3) A German soldier poses with his dog (1940)4) a French woman having her head shaved following liberation, as punishment for an on-going relationship with a Nazi soldier during the occupation of France5) Tank attack at night during the battle of Kursk (1943)6) Omaha Beach June 6th (1944)7) wreck of the ss normandie (1942)8) Mt Rushmore construction (1939)9) Arnold Schwarzenegger & Shaquille O'neal10) Children playing cricket in a London street (1930)11) Alfred Hitchcock with…
  • Ellis Island – The gateway to freedom

    22 Nov 2014 | 6:56 am
    Ellis Island – The gateway to freedomFor millions of people the dream of a better life began on Ellis islandThe way into freedom was a rocky one. Only after a series of surveys, test, examinations your shot at the American dream was granted - or in some cases not.Ellis Island was for more then a century the gateway to the united states, that thousands of people hoped to pass. 60 years ago, November 12. 1954 the reception centre closed its doors. Today its one of the main tourist attractions in New York.Almost every American comes from an immigrant family. But the immigrants back then faced…
  • Voyages of Christopher Columbus

    20 Nov 2014 | 9:58 am
    European discovery of AmericaAfter Columbus had finally received the approval for is journey by the Spanish king, he started his voyage on august 3, 1492.Three ships were sent on their way. The flagship was the Santa Maria, a crarrack. It had three masts and was slightly larger than the other two ships, the Niña and the Pinta, which were only caravels. The two smaller ships were commanded by brothers, Martin and Vicente Pinzon.The first problem arose after only three days on sea, the rudder of the Pinta broke. The damage was so significant that they had to stay on the canary islands for…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    New Historian

  • Egyptian Book of Spells Decoded

    Lloyd Miller II
    26 Nov 2014 | 12:17 am
    In what could be a huge breakthrough or a huge mistake (we hope the former), researchers have finally deciphered an Egyptian handbook full of spells and invocations. The “Handbook of Ritual Power” first came to light in the latter stages of 1981, when Macquarie University acquired it from an antique’s dealer in Vienna. The exact origin of the text is still unknown. The 1,300-year-old codex is written in Coptic, and the contents includes spells on exorcism, love, and health. The findings have been published in a book entitled “A Coptic Handbook of Ritual Power”, written by…
  • Ancient Silk Road Cemetery Contains Mythical Carvings

    Adam Steedman Thake
    26 Nov 2014 | 12:12 am
    A 1,700 year old cemetery on the Silk Road has just been revealed. The cemetery was found in the city of Kucha, located in present-day northwest China. Ten well-preserved tombs were excavated in all, seven of which are large brick buildings. The city of Kucha was of particular importance in the protection of the Western Frontiers of China. Control of the area was vital for China’s rulers as the Silk Road, the main trade artery between China and Western Europe, passed through the Western Frontiers. Kucha, called Qiuci at the time, was a powerful city state located on the branch of the…
  • Thanksgiving – The Development of a Tradition

    Daryl Worthington
    26 Nov 2014 | 12:07 am
    This Thursday people across the United States will celebrate Thanksgiving by feasting on delicious food and celebrating with their families. The national holiday marks a key event in the early settlement of Europeans in North America, and its history allows us to see the process by which Americans have formulated their historical and cultural identity. The tradition of celebrating Thanksgiving on a Thursday dates back to the first European colonisers of Massachusetts. Their annual post-harvest holiday was celebrated every autumn, usually on a Thursday as it was a mid-week day already set…
  • Enormous Statue Heads Unearthed in Cambodia

    Lloyd Miller II
    24 Nov 2014 | 10:31 pm
    Workers renovating the Banteay Chhmar Temple in Cambodia have happened on a shocking discovery – three large Angkorian-era statue heads buried about half a metre under the soil. Two of the heads are intact, while the other is broken. The statue heads depict the ancient Hindu belief that gods (Devas) and demons (Asuras) worked together to form Amrita, the nectar of immortal life. The statue heads are made from sandstone and seem to have been created during the reign of King Jayavarman VII, who ruled over the Khmer Empire. The Banteay Chhmar Temple is one of the most complex archaeological…
  • Ancient Settlement Found Underwater

    Lloyd Miller II
    24 Nov 2014 | 10:27 pm
    Hot on the heels of the discovery of a pottery workshop in the ancient city of Pompeii, archaeologists have found the remains of another one at the bottom of the Aegean Sea. The workshop was part of an ancient Greek settlement on the island of Delos. The announcement of the discovery was made by the Greek Ministry of Culture, who are dubbing it “the underwater Pompeii”. The settlement lays at a depth of about six feet, off the northeastern coast of Delos. It is strange how close the ruins are to the coast, as discoveries like this are usually made close to ports. The discovery was made by…
Log in