History

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  • 10 Things You May Not Know About Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

    History in the Headlines
    Evan Andrews
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:10 am
    1. She worked as a reporter and photographer. After attending Vassar University, the Sorbonne and George Washington University, Onassis got her first job working as a reporter for the Washington Times-Herald in 1952. As the paper’s “Inquiring Photographer,” the future first lady roamed the streets of the nation’s capital asking strangers their opinions on everything from personal finance (“Do you approve of joint bank accounts?”) to politics and relationships (“Do you think a wife should let her husband think he’s smarter than she is?”). Among the many people she interviewed…
  • Elizabeth Proctor: The Salem Witch Trials Widow

    History of Massachusetts
    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    21 Jul 2014 | 7:06 am
    Elizabeth Proctor, wife of Salem Village farmer John Proctor, was accused of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials in 1692. The Proctors were a wealthy family who lived on a large rented farm on the outskirts of Salem Village, in … Continue reading →
  • ‘Clinton Inc.’ Author Dishes on Monica Lewinsky and the Blue Dress

    Breaking News
    29 Jul 2014 | 12:46 pm
    Monica Lewinsky, now 41, is once again the object of prurient curiosity.
  • Roman Ruins in Britain Hailed as “Pompeii of the North”

    History in the Headlines
    Evan Andrews
    25 Jul 2014 | 1:43 pm
    Excavations at the Binchester site (Credit: University of Durham) Known as “Vinovia” to the Romans, the outpost once commanded the crossroads of the River Wear and Dere Street, an ancient road that linked the Roman headquarters at York with Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall near Edinburgh, Scotland. Researchers with the Binchester excavation project have been digging at the fort since 2009, and they now say the site includes some of the most exquisitely preserved ruins ever unearthed in Britain. “These findings are hugely significant as they are virtually intact and present a…
  • Transiting Exoplanet with Longest Known Year Found

    History in the Headlines
    Christopher Klein
    24 Jul 2014 | 12:36 pm
    Artist rendering of Kepler-421b (Credit: David A. Aguilar/CFA) Following its launch in March 2009, the unblinking eye of NASA’s powerful Kepler telescope spent more than four years patiently staring at the same corner of the Milky Way in search of exoplanets—planets that orbit stars outside our solar system. Relying on the “transit method,” by which the presence of alien worlds can be detected as the brightness of parent stars dip slightly as orbiting bodies pass in front, astronomers have so far used the Kepler telescope to discover nearly 1,000 exoplanets with more than 3,000…
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    History in the Headlines

  • Warren G. Harding’s Steamy Love Letters Unsealed

    Christopher Klein
    29 Jul 2014 | 12:21 pm
    The affair between the future president and the wife of one of his best friends, dry-goods store operator James Phillips, began in August 1905 when Harding was lieutenant governor of Ohio and spanned his six years in the U.S. Senate before his landslide election to the White House in 1920. The newly unsealed letters, some of which are as long as 40 pages, date from 1910 onwards and abound with what Harding called “a mad, tender, devoted, ardent, eager, passion-wild, jealous…hungry…love” in one missive. “I love you more than all the world and have no hope of reward on earth or…
  • 10 Things You May Not Know About Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

    Evan Andrews
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:10 am
    1. She worked as a reporter and photographer. After attending Vassar University, the Sorbonne and George Washington University, Onassis got her first job working as a reporter for the Washington Times-Herald in 1952. As the paper’s “Inquiring Photographer,” the future first lady roamed the streets of the nation’s capital asking strangers their opinions on everything from personal finance (“Do you approve of joint bank accounts?”) to politics and relationships (“Do you think a wife should let her husband think he’s smarter than she is?”). Among the many people she interviewed…
  • Roman Ruins in Britain Hailed as “Pompeii of the North”

    Evan Andrews
    25 Jul 2014 | 1:43 pm
    Excavations at the Binchester site (Credit: University of Durham) Known as “Vinovia” to the Romans, the outpost once commanded the crossroads of the River Wear and Dere Street, an ancient road that linked the Roman headquarters at York with Hadrian’s Wall and the Antonine Wall near Edinburgh, Scotland. Researchers with the Binchester excavation project have been digging at the fort since 2009, and they now say the site includes some of the most exquisitely preserved ruins ever unearthed in Britain. “These findings are hugely significant as they are virtually intact and present a…
  • Transiting Exoplanet with Longest Known Year Found

    Christopher Klein
    24 Jul 2014 | 12:36 pm
    Artist rendering of Kepler-421b (Credit: David A. Aguilar/CFA) Following its launch in March 2009, the unblinking eye of NASA’s powerful Kepler telescope spent more than four years patiently staring at the same corner of the Milky Way in search of exoplanets—planets that orbit stars outside our solar system. Relying on the “transit method,” by which the presence of alien worlds can be detected as the brightness of parent stars dip slightly as orbiting bodies pass in front, astronomers have so far used the Kepler telescope to discover nearly 1,000 exoplanets with more than 3,000…
  • New Research Drills Into History of Cavities

    Sarah Pruitt
    23 Jul 2014 | 2:29 pm
    The first study focused on the bacterium that causes toothaches, known as Streptococcus mutans. This bacterium, which lives naturally in the mouth, metabolizes the sugars from food and excretes lactic acid, which wears away at the enamel covering the teeth. This process causes tooth decay and dental caries (Latin for “rot”), better known as cavities. In the new study, scientists analyzed S. mutans DNA extracted from teeth dating back to the Bronze Age. They found that the bacterium has been mutating rapidly throughout the course of human history, and becoming more diverse as the human…
 
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    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Sunday 28 July 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    (Lord’s day). This morning as my wife and I were going to church, comes Mrs. Ramsay to see us, so we sent her to church, and we went too, and came back to dinner, and she dined with us and was wellcome. To church again in the afternoon, and then come home with us Sir W. Pen, and drank with us, and then went away, and my wife after him to see his daughter that is lately come out of Ireland. I staid at home at my book; she came back again and tells me that whereas I expected she should have been a great beauty, she is a very plain girl. This evening my wife gives me all my linen, which I…
  • Saturday 27 July 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    To Westminster, where at Mr. Montagu’s chamber I heard a Frenchman play, a friend of Monsieur Eschar’s, upon the guitar, most extreme well, though at the best methinks it is but a bawble. From thence to Westminster Hall, where it was expected that the Parliament was to have been adjourned for two or three months, but something hinders it for a day or two. In the lobby I spoke with Mr. George Montagu, and advised about a ship to carry my Lord Hinchingbroke and the rest of the young gentlemen to France, and they have resolved of going in a hired vessell from Rye, and not in a man of…
  • Friday 26 July 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    26 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    At home all the morning, and walking met with Mr. Hill of Cambridge at Pope’s Head Alley with some women with him whom he took and me into the tavern there, and did give us wine, and would fain seem to be very knowing in the affairs of state, and tells me that yesterday put a change to the whole state of England as to the Church; for the King now would be forced to favour Presbytery, or the City would leave him: but I heed not what he says, though upon enquiry I do find that things in the Parliament are in a great disorder. Home at noon and there found Mr. Moore, and with him to an…
  • Thursday 25 July 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    25 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    This morning came my box of papers from Brampton of all my uncle’s papers, which will now set me at work enough. At noon I went to the Exchange, where I met my uncle Wight, and found him so discontented about my father (whether that he takes it ill that he has not been acquainted with things, or whether he takes it ill that he has nothing left him, I cannot tell), for which I am much troubled, and so staid not long to talk with him. Thence to my mother’s, where I found my wife and my aunt Bell and Mrs. Ramsey, and great store of tattle there was between the old women and my…
  • Wednesday 24 July 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    24 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    This morning my wife in bed tells me of our being robbed of our silver tankard, which vexed me all day for the negligence of my people to leave the door open. My wife and I by water to Whitehall, where I left her to her business and I to my cozen Thomas Pepys, and discoursed with him at large about our business of my uncle’s will. He can give us no light at all into his estate, but upon the whole tells me that he do believe that he has left but little money, though something more than we have found, which is about 500l. Here came Sir G. Lane by chance, seeing a bill upon the door to…
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    History in the News

  • 10 Heroic Women of World War I

    29 Jul 2014 | 10:28 am
    It's been 100 years since the First World War, one of history's most fatal conflicts.
  • White House chef's book tells all about fixing food for a first family

    29 Jul 2014 | 6:13 am
    When you work at the White House, you leave your politics at the front door. That may sound counterintuitive, but it is true if you work there as a chef.
  • World War I exhibition opens in Dublin

    29 Jul 2014 | 1:53 am
    A new exhibition has opened at St Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin, to mark the centenary of the outbreak of World War I. The centrepiece of the 'Lives Remembered' exhibition is a steel sculpture called the 'Tree of Remembrance', which is surrounded by barbed wire.
  • Historical Creates a Buzz as it Hits Bookshelves

    28 Jul 2014 | 9:44 pm
    Set during the aftermath of the American Civil War, Confederado do Norte tells the story of Mary Catherine MacDonald Dias Oliveira Atwell, a child torn from her war devastated home in Georgia and thrust into the primitive Brazilian interior where the young woman she becomes must learn to recreate herself in order to survive.
  • How World War I gave us drones

    28 Jul 2014 | 5:35 pm
    Air power harks back to Civil War-era hot air balloons and was used all over the theaters of World War I for reconnaissance, bombardment, and aerial combat.
 
 
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    History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

  • July 29, 1958: NASA created

    28 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    On this day in 1958, the U.S. Congress passes legislation establishing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), a civilian agency responsible for coordinating America's activities in space. NASA has since sponsored space expeditions, both human and mechanical, that have yielded vital information about the solar system and universe. It has also launched numerous earth-orbiting satellites that have been instrumental in everything from weather forecasting to navigation to global communications. NASA was created in response to the Soviet Union's October 4, 1957 launch of its…
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    The New York History Blog

  • 150 Years Ago A NY Man Languished In Andersonville

    Guest Contributor
    29 Jul 2014 | 11:00 am
    Rollin O. Sanford died on July 29, 1864 while a prisoner of war at the infamous Andersonville prison in Georgia. His only son, Rollin J, was born that very same day in Hopkinton NY, twelve hundred miles to the north, in what is now the Adirondack Park. While there are countless stories of tragedy and […]
  • MANY Museum Institute To Focus On Advocacy

    Editorial Staff
    29 Jul 2014 | 6:45 am
    “Museums are Essential! Let people know!” – that’s the message the Museum Association of New York (MANY) is sending in its invitation to this year’s Museum Institute at Great Camp Sagamore in Raquette Lake, NY, taking place September 21st to 24th, 2014. “Advocacy helps museums and other cultural institutions communicate what they do, why they […]
  • The Fight in New York State for Weekly Pay

    Lawrence P. Gooley
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Remember the hit song, “Sixteen Tons,” taken to #1 by Tennessee Ernie Ford many decades ago? Most people are familiar with the famous line, “St. Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’t go, I owe my soul to the Company Store,” meaning, “Hey, I can’t die … I’ve got debt to pay.” The line […]
  • The Negro National And Eastern Colored Leagues

    Editorial Staff
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    As the companion volume to Black Baseball Entrepreneurs, 1860–1901: Operating by Any Means Necessary, Michael E. Lomax’s new book, Black Baseball Entrepreneurs, 1902-1931: The Negro National and Eastern Colored Leagues (Syracuse Univ. Press, 2014), continues to chronicle the history of black baseball in the United States. The first volume traced the development of baseball from […]
  • The Shadow of Kinzua: The Seneca Since World War II

    Editorial Staff
    26 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Kinzua Dam has cast a long shadow on Seneca life since World War II. The project, formally dedicated in 1966, broke the Treaty of Canandaigua of 1794, flooded approximately 10,000 acres of Seneca lands in New York and Pennsylvania, and forced the relocation of hundreds of tribal members. In Laurence M. Hauptman’s In The Shadow […]
 
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    USHistoryBlog.com

  • Which Founding Father Are You?

    klkatz
    15 Jul 2014 | 7:23 am
    With 55 men compromising, debating, agreeing and disagreeing and finally creating one document, you can imagine the number of personalities at hand... and many reputations at stake.  Which founding father are you? Take the Consitution Center's Founders Quiz to find out: http://constitutioncenter.org/foundersquiz/And if it means anything... I was James Madison.This content is copyrighted. Copyright (c) 2010 - Original post at USHistoryBlog.com Part of the USHistorySite.com Network.
  • Martin Luther King Timeline

    klkatz
    17 Jan 2013 | 6:55 pm
    Martin Luther King Timeline courtesy of OnlineCollegeCourses.com This content is copyrighted. Copyright (c) 2010 - Original post at USHistoryBlog.com Part of the USHistorySite.com Network.
  • Sydney and Max Blast Through The Past – An American History DVD series for kids.

    klkatz
    6 Nov 2012 | 10:55 am
    The past generation had Schoolhouse Rock, this new generation can now learn from Sydney and Max.  “Sydney and Max Blast Through the Past” is a new DVD series that provides a fascinating study of American history through the eyes of teenagers. It is unlike any series ever produced because it is built around the idea of teens teaching teens; kids are loving it.This series is designed for children ages 10 – 16 and is guaranteed to encourage critical thinking as viewers follow Sydney and Max’s investigation into America’s past.  The music, dialogue, and episode length were all…
  • President Biographies

    klkatz
    12 Jul 2012 | 7:28 pm
    I recently took on the endeavor of creating some content for USHistorySite.com. I figured since most of the visitors to the site were teachers looking for lesson plans and that I could complement the lesson plans with real content... So... I started with Biographies of the US Presidents.  Though I haven't completed all of them... I tried to knock out some of the most important ones.Enjoy the bios. http://ushistorysite.com/presidents_bios.phpThis content is copyrighted. Copyright (c) 2010 - Original post at USHistoryBlog.com Part of the USHistorySite.com Network.
  • Mr. Benjamin Franklin

    klkatz
    6 Mar 2012 | 9:51 pm
    Source: nndb.com via US on PinterestThis content is copyrighted. Copyright (c) 2010 - Original post at USHistoryBlog.com Part of the USHistorySite.com Network.
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    O Say Can You See?

  • The search is over! Smithsonian announces the five FFA jacket donors

    NMAH
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    What do a former U.S. president, a spotted hog raiser, two former teachers, and a librarian have in common? They're all FFA (formerly known as Future Farmers of America) members whose lives and careers have been shaped by agricultural education and who have generously donated their jackets to the museum for inclusion in the upcoming American Enterprise exhibition. Intern Chris Fite reports on the men and women behind the jackets, but before he does, don't forget that we're still collecting your personal stories of youth agricultural education on our Agricultural…
  • Smithsonian discovers moving stories of agricultural education in search for FFA jacket

    NMAH
    17 Jul 2014 | 7:53 am
    We recently asked for your help in collecting an FFA (Future Farmers of America) jacket with a great personal story—and you came through! Intern Chris Fite reports on the nationwide jacket search and why we're preserving the history of youth agricultural education in America. Learn more about the five jackets that were added to the museum's collection on July 25, 2014, in this post.  Finding and collecting artifacts for the national collections can be challenging. "Determining what is important is a major step," said Curator Peter Liebhold, who led the search for the…
  • From electric hairbrushes to toning sneakers: Absurd advertising for over 100 years

    NMAH
    16 Jul 2014 | 3:45 am
    Although many of the products that Americans consume today would have been unimaginable to our forebears, the means by which they are advertised have remained relatively constant since the late 19th century. Intern Meredith Stabbe from the Division of Medicine and Science gives us a glimpse into the relationship between inventors, advertisements, and consumers since 1872. In my short few weeks working here at the museum, I have been scanning old advertising materials. Since I interned in the Division of Medicine and Science, the focus of my archiving relates to medicine. I scanned 19th and…
  • Before your kid opens a lemonade stand, try this fun activity

    NMAH
    14 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    Educator Victoria Altman introduces a new book-based summer activity to share with youngsters, especially budding entrepreneurs. Most children's lemonade stands aren't yet accepting credit cards—and it's important for kids (and adults!) to learn how to transact using coins and bills. "Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money" is by Emily Jenkins and illustrated by G. Brian Karas Lemonade in Winter is the story of two siblings who decide to open a lemonade stand on a snowy winter day. In this book, written by Emily Jenkins and illustrated by…
  • Donor Spotlight: Preserving the past for the future

    NMAH
    10 Jul 2014 | 11:50 am
    Individual Giving Associate Lauren Collette spotlights museum member Shirley Loo. Loo grew up in Hawaii and didn't visit the Smithsonian until college, but has been deeply involved in the museum for many years. As a development professional, I am frequently asked, "What do you love most about your job?" Without a moment of hesitation, I always enthusiastically reply, "Getting to know the members!" I had the opportunity to spend time with Shirley Loo, a member of the Smithsonian Council for American History, and learned a great deal about what motivates her to give to…
 
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    Toptenz.net

  • 10 Ancient Cultures That Practiced Ritual Human Sacrifice

    Paul Jongko
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:10 pm
    Almost all of us would cringe at thought of sacrificing a person’s life for the purpose of appeasing the gods. Modern society associates the phrase “human sacrifice” with brutal, demonic, or satanic rituals. However, cultures that are considered by scholars to be highly civilized, affluent, and advanced considered human sacrifice a  normal part of life. […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Ancient Cultures That Practiced Ritual Human Sacrifice appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Famous Car Wrecks

    Daniel Zarzeczny
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:01 pm
    A Brief History On July 29, 1973, British race car driver Roger Williamson met his death when his Formula 1race car crashed at the Dutch Grand Prix at Zandvoort Circuit in the Netherlands.  The 25 year old 2 time British Formula 3 champion was trapped under his flipped car, not seriously hurt from the crash,Continue reading... The post 10 Famous Car Wrecks appeared first on Cracked History.   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Famous Car Wrecks appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Chris Pratt’s Star-Lord Audition Was Only 30 Seconds Long

    Karl Smallwood
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:49 am
    If you’re not currently hyped for the new Guardians of the Galaxy movie, you’re part of a tiny minority, because according to The post Chris Pratt’s Star-Lord Audition Was Only 30 Seconds Long appeared first on Fact Fiend.   Source: Toptenz.net The post Chris Pratt’s Star-Lord Audition Was Only 30 Seconds Long appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Completely Crazy Facts About The KKK

    Nolan Moore
    27 Jul 2014 | 9:10 pm
    What’s white, racist, and totally insane? No, it’s not Mel Gibson. We’re talking about the Ku Klux Klan, America’s most infamous hate group. Founded in 1870, the KKK has terrorized American citizens through propaganda, arson, and murder. Fortunately, the Klan’s popularity has faded over time, and today they’re viewed as a sad reminder of America’s […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Completely Crazy Facts About The KKK appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Assassinations With Unintended Consequences

    Daniel Zarzeczny
    27 Jul 2014 | 9:01 pm
    A Brief History On July 28, 1914, the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia, starting World War I.  When a Serbian nationalist assassinated the Archduke (heir to the throne) of the Austrian empire to protest Austro-Hungarian occupation of Serbian territory, he never could have seen the incredible consequences of the worst war in human historyContinue reading... The post 10 Assassinations With Unintended Consequences appeared first on Cracked History.   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Assassinations With Unintended Consequences appeared first on Toptenz.net.
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    History Of Macedonia

  • Νίμιτς: Δεν κομίζει νέα πρόταση για το ζήτημα της ονομασίας

    Stern
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:59 am
        Ο διαμεσολαβητής του ΟΗΕ για το ζήτημα της ονομασίας Μάθιου Νίμιτς επισκέπτεται σήμερα και αύριο τα Σκόπια. Κατά την άφιξή του στα Σκόπια, ο κ Νίμιτς δήλωσε σε δημοσιογράφους ότι δεν κομίζει νέα πρόταση για το ζήτημα της ονομασίας. «Δεν κομίζω νέα πρόταση, αλλά έχω κάποιες ιδέες» ανέφερε ο κ.Νίμιτς, ο οποίος αύριο θα έχει…
  • Η μάχη του Κλειδίου και τα Βαλκάνια

    Stern
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:30 am
    Κωνσταντίνος Χολέβας- Πολιτικός επιστήμων   Από ένα εκτενές άρθρο του Σαράντου Καργάκου στο περιοδικό «ΕΡΩ» (τεύχος Απριλίου – Ιουνίου 2014) θυμηθήκαμε ότι στις 29 Ιουλίου συμπληρώνονται ακριβώς 1.000 χρόνια από τη μάχη του Κλειδίου μεταξύ του στρατού του αυτοκράτορος Βασιλείου Β’ του Μακεδόνος και του βουλγάρου τσάρου…
  • Τα «πειρατικά» του Γκρούεφσκι δένουν στην πρωτεύουσα του κιτς

    Stern
    27 Jul 2014 | 5:03 am
    «Βασιλικές μακεδονικές γαλέρες» εφεύραν και στήνουν στον ποταμό Βαρδάρη (Vardar), ο οποίος διασχίζει την πόλη των Σκοπίων, οι άνθρωποι του Νίκολα Γκρούεφσκι. ΤΟΥ ΧΡΙΣΤΟΥ ΤΕΛΙΔΗ Έτσι, συμπληρώνουν το σκηνικό του κιτς με τα αρχαϊκά κτίρια-μπαρόκ και τα αντίγραφα αγαλμάτων αρχαίων Μακεδόνων, που έχει στηθεί στο κέντρο της…
  • Στη φυλακή για αρχαιοκαπηλία ο «εθνικός αρχαιολόγος» των Σκοπίων

    Stern
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:22 pm
    Σε ποινές φυλάκισης, που αθροιστικά φτάνουν τα 45 έτη, καταδίκασε χθες δικαστήριο των Σκοπίων 17 κατηγορούμενους για υποθέσεις αρχαιοκαπηλίας, μεταξύ των οποίων και τον πρώην επικεφαλής της δημόσιας υπηρεσίας προστασίας πολιτιστικής κληρονομιάς της χώρας, Πάσκο Κούζμαν. Ο Πάσκο Κούζμαν, καταδικάστηκε σε ποινή φυλάκισης τριών…
  • Καγκελάριος Μέρκελ: H… νονά των Σκοπίων!

    Stern
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:25 am
    Από τον Αλέξανδρο Τάρκα *   Η ΕΠΙΔΙΩΞΗ της καγκελαρίου Α. Μέρκελ για την άσκηση ισχύος (Machtpolitik) υπονομεύεται από μια κοινή γνώμη που της χαρίζει δημοφιλία, αλλά απορρίπτει τον ισχυρό ρόλο της Γερμανίας στην εξωτερική και αμυντική πολιτική. Παρομοίως, ο υπουργός Εξωτερικών Φ. Στάινμαγιερ αντιγράφει την «πολιτική έκδοσης…
 
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    Claire Gebben

  • A new day in history

    clairegebben
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:15 pm
    Once upon a time, before I really started researching 19th century history, I lumped the entire 19th century into the Victorian era, all about propriety and manners, dominated by “prudish, hypocritical, stuffy, [and] narrow-minded” cultural attitudes (Murfin and Ray 496). While two-thirds of the 19th century did fall within Queen Victoria’s reign in England (1837-1901), I now know the Victorian America preoccupation involved mainly New England and the Deep South. Most American citizens weren’t about establishing high society. They were on the move, focused on…
  • Civil War POWs

    clairegebben
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:59 am
    In the current July/August “Echoes,” published by the Ohio Historical Society, I was delighted to find a piece about the Union Army POW camp Johnson’s Island (located in Sandusky Bay just to the south of Lake Erie). I don’t remember how I happened on the existence of the Johnson’s Island camp in my research for The Last of the Blacksmiths, but I remember thinking how spotty the information seemed. Now, the “Echoes” magazine notes, there’s a new exhibit called “Privy to History” about the Johnson’s Island Civil War Prison at…
  • Homestead Digitization Project

    clairegebben
    3 Jul 2014 | 9:17 am
    Breaking news for genealogists and family history researchers. Files detailing Nebraska’s homesteading history have been digitized and are now available to the public. The milestone’s part of a larger effort by the Homestead Digitization Project to put all homesteading documents from around the U.S. online. For more on the subject, Robert Siegel speaks with historian Blake Bell from the Homestead National Monument in Beatrice, Neb. Link to interview on NPR The post Homestead Digitization Project appeared first on Claire Gebben.
  • Buffalo robes

    clairegebben
    17 Jun 2014 | 12:39 pm
    I first included buffalo robes in the novel The Last of the Blacksmiths because it was something my grandmother used to mention when she described sleigh rides. I didn’t really know what they were like — after all, buffalo robes are not an everyday object now like they once were in the 1800′s. Then again, there’s always Wikipedia. “From the 1840s to the 1870s the great demand for buffalo robes in the commercial centres of Montreal, New York, St. Paul and St. Louis was a major factor that led to the near extinction of the species. The robes were used as blankets…
  • Guessing right

    clairegebben
    23 May 2014 | 10:11 am
    “You might want to look through Dad’s stuff, the boxes in the spare room,” my brother Craig said to me over the phone. I was visiting his house in Cincinnati in early May. He had left for work earlier that morning. “I’m not sure what’s in there.” The rest of the afternoon found me sitting on the floor of my brother’s living room, pictures and documents spread around me, as I took photo after photo of family genealogy documents, histories, and old photographs. The material I’d pulled out of storage had been sorted into 9 x 12 manila…
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    History of Massachusetts

  • Elizabeth Proctor: The Salem Witch Trials Widow

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    21 Jul 2014 | 7:06 am
    Elizabeth Proctor, wife of Salem Village farmer John Proctor, was accused of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials in 1692. The Proctors were a wealthy family who lived on a large rented farm on the outskirts of Salem Village, in … Continue reading →
  • William Dawes: The Forgotten Midnight Rider

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    17 Feb 2014 | 8:25 am
    William Dawes was a Boston tanner and one of the riders sent by Dr. Joseph Warren to alert John Hancock and Samuel Adams of the approaching British army on the night of April 18th, 1775. Dawes was born in Boston … Continue reading →
  • John Hathorne: The Salem Witch Judge

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    28 Jan 2014 | 8:19 am
    John Hathorne was a judge during the Salem Witch Trials and the great-great grandfather of author Nathaniel Hawthorne. Hathorne was born in Salem on August 5, 1641 to William Hathorne and Anne Smith. He was the fifth of nine children. … Continue reading →
  • Mercy Lewis: Orphan and Afflicted Girl

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    21 Jan 2014 | 8:03 am
    Mercy Lewis was one of the afflicted girls of the Salem Witch Trials and a servant in Thomas Putnam’s home. Lewis, the daughter of Phillip Lewis, was born in Falmouth, Maine in 1675. On August 11, 1676, three-year-old Mercy Lewis … Continue reading →
  • HBO Producing a New Drama About the Salem Witch Trials

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    16 Dec 2013 | 6:24 am
    Jenji Kohan, the creator of the shows “Weeds” and “Orange is the New Black,” is currently developing a new drama about the Salem Witch Trials for HBO, according to an article on the Hollywood Reporter website: “The untitled Salem period … Continue reading →
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    Ancient Origins

  • New research suggests Tonga was a vast seafaring empire

    aprilholloway
    29 Jul 2014 | 6:43 am
    Scattered over 500,000 square kilometres in the southern Pacific Ocean are the Tonga islands. The kingdom of Tonga is a Polynesian sovereign state and archipelago comprising nearly two hundred islands with around a quarter of them inhabited. Now new research suggests that the ancient seafaring empire of Tonga served as a hub through which distant settlements exchanged artifacts and ideas, according to a report in Live Science. The date that the first occupation of the Tongan islands took place is ambiguous - as is the dating of most of the archaeological sites in the region. However, the…
  • The Forgotten Stones of Karahan Tepe, Turkey

    Hugh Newman
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:59 pm
    Karahan Tepe is the sister site to the enigmatic Göbekli Tepe, that sits around 23 miles southeast of Göbekli, upon an elevated limestone ridge. It has many striking similarities to Göbekli. Firstly, it consists of T-Shaped pillars ... Read moreSection: Ancient PlacesEuropeOpinionGuest Authors
  • Unravelling the mystery of the Chaco Canyon culture collapse

    aprilholloway
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:40 pm
    For over 2,000 years, ancient Pueblo peoples occupied a vast region of the south-western United States. Chaco Canyon, a major centre of ancestral Pueblo culture between 850 and 1250 AD, was a focus for ceremonials, trade and political activity for the prehistoric Four Corners area. The Puebloans quarried sandstone blocks and hauled timber from great distances, assembling fifteen major complexes that are thought to have been the largest buildings in North America until the 19th century. The massive multi-storied buildings oriented to solar, lunar, and cardinal directions, the high level of…
  • Pre-historic rock art in Kurnool, India

    KONUDULARAMAKRISHNAREDDY
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:02 am
    The region of Rayalaseema is comprised of four districts within the state of Andhra Pradesh - Anantapur, Chittor, Kadapa and Kurnool - all of which record a very good cultural evolution from the Palaeolithic, all the way through to modern times. The area, wherein archaeological explorations have been carried out, is a part of the Erramalai hill ranges, which has a hot and humid climate and is principally fed by the south-west and north-east monsoons. The low-lying areas near the foot-hill, and some dried up water tracts show the existence of Palaeo-water-channels. The presence of fertile…
  • Major find as eight sunken ships discovered in the Aegean

    aprilholloway
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:46 pm
    A team of underwater archaeologists from Dokuz Eylül University’s Institute of Marine Science and Technology (IMST) have discovered eight new shipwrecks in the Aegean Sea, near Antalya in Turkey, according to a report in Hurriyet Daily News.  The ships are believed to belong to the Ottoman era and will be handed over to the Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology for study and hopefully later display to the public. The IMST, which trains underwater archaeology graduate students to investigation ancient shipwrecks, determine ancient sea trade routes, and examine ancient harbours and their…
 
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    English Legal History

  • Pirate Executions in Early Modern London

    englishlegalhistory
    9 Jul 2014 | 12:07 am
    In the East London neighborhood of Wapping behind the Town of Ramsgate Pub lies a replica of a noose and hanging scaffold. This commemorates Execution Dock, most famous as the spot where pirates were hung for their crimes in early modern London.  Execution Dock was a place of execution for over four hundred years: the last execution to take place there was 1830.  Execution Dock served as the site for all fatally condemned maritime criminals, but the cruelest treatment was reserved for those to be hung for piracy. ‘A Perspective View of the River Thames’, 1780 (Photo courtesy of National…
  • History of the Solicitors’ Training Contract

    englishlegalhistory
    10 Feb 2014 | 10:52 am
    Section 1: Contextual Overview of the Development of the English Legal Profession Before a full sketch of the history of the Training Contract can be drawn, it is necessary to provide a brief introduction to the development of the English legal profession as a whole. From the mid-12th Century, there existed a Bench of learned men at Westminster who were an extension, and administrators, of the King’s justice and heard legal pleas. After a few decades, they decided to travel the realm and administer justice locally, and naturally their number grew. The development of anything that could be…
  • History of Defamation

    englishlegalhistory
    18 Oct 2013 | 1:08 pm
    The common law test for Defamation. Before the early 1300s, actions for the predecessor of defamation were obscure and purely within the jurisdiction of the Church courts, it was not until much later that the King’s courts allowed an action for defamatory words. The often physically-based nature of the common law was not in favour of creating an offence which rested on mere words. It was much more concerned with the tangible actions and results of, for example, assault, theft and murder. It took until the 1500s before a common law action for defamation appeared. Perhaps the key reason…
  • Detection in England from Bow Street to the Met

    englishlegalhistory
    23 Jul 2013 | 10:06 am
    Detectives have had a special niche in popular culture for many years. Beginning in the nineteenth century with the works of Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins and followed later in the century by Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, detectives captured the nineteenth-century imagination. Today, crime novels, although still popular, have been supplanted by serialized crime dramas like the CSI and Law & Order franchises, and more recently by the revived Sherlock series and Luther. But where does this fascination with detection come from? Some have argued that the Victorians (and…
  • Arson in Medieval Ireland

    englishlegalhistory
    5 Jul 2013 | 11:54 am
    Photograph by Riona Doolan. The medieval Irish law tracts, popularly known as the Brehon Laws, were in use from the early medieval period to the start of the seventeenth century in Ireland. The canonical text of most of these laws were first written down between AD 650-750, and the laws with associated gloss and commentary survive in manuscripts from the twelfth to the sixteenth centuries. Though many of these laws have been rendered into English, a large number have yet to be critically edited and translated. Punitive imprisonment was not regularly used in medieval Ireland for a crime;…
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    DisputedPast

  • Early medieval bowl reveals widespread Frisian’ trading network

    Jan Huisman
    2 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    The discovery of a rich decorated silver bowl at an excavation in the Dutch town of Oegstgeest (near Leiden) gives us an insight into the widespread international network of its early medieval owners. The bowl was created in the sixth century, probably in the Mediterranean or Near East. Further decorations, ... Read More →
  • Former Auschwitz guards will not be prosecuted

    Jan Huisman
    22 Jun 2014 | 10:25 am
    Many of the former Auschwitz guards against whom criminal investigations were started, wont be called to justice. The elderly defendants, aged from 88 to 94 years old, are not fit enough for a trial says newsmagazine Der Spiegel sunday. Certainly eleven alleged camp guards who were arrested in April (DisputedPast reported) are now exempt from prosecution.... Read More →
  • The SS built a secret army after WWII

    Jan Huisman
    11 May 2014 | 2:31 pm
    The notorious Waffem-SS continued their military activities after the Second World War. They built on a secret army in West Germany, starting in 1949. Their aim was to fight off a Russian invasion. Since Germany wasn’t allowed to have an army, they wanted to filled the gap left by the demise of... Read More →
  • Kenya: White Terror

    Jan Huisman
    8 May 2014 | 11:30 pm
    The Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya (1952-1960) is one of the bloodiest colonial wars fought in Africa. Black Kenyans wanted to oust the British oppressors and attacked white colonists. The British response was brutal. They send in the army, set up camps and tortured and killed thousands. In this documentary,... Read More →
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    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • Pizarro and Atahualpa:The Curse of the Lost Inca Gold

    29 Jul 2014 | 12:36 pm
    In November 1532 CE, Francisco Pizarro led a group of about 160 conquistadors into the Inca city of Cajamarca. The illiterate and illegitimate son of an Extremaduran nobleman and an impoverished woman, Pizarro had spent his entire life on a quest to become wealthy and be remembered. After hearing of how a distant cousin of his, Hernan Cortes, had looted millions in gold from the Aztecs, Pizarro...
  • Hercules and Alcestis: Personal Excellence and Social Duty

    26 Jul 2014 | 2:40 pm
    For the ancient Greeks, the quality of arete (personal excellence) and the concept of eusebia (social duty) were most important. Aristotle discusses both of these at length in his Nichomachean Ethics and relates arete to eudaimonia - translated as "happiness" but actually meaning "to be possessed of a good spirit". To have arete, Aristotle claims, one must associate oneself with those...
  • Shield of Heracles

    25 Jul 2014 | 6:47 am
    The Shield of Heracles (also known as The Shield of Herakles, Aspis Herakleous) is a poem of 480 hexameter lines written by an unknown Greek poet in the style of Hesiod (lived 8th century BCE). It deals with the Greek hero Herakles (also known as Hercules) and his nephew Iolaus and their battle with Cycnus, son of the war-god Ares. It is unclear when the action of the poem takes place in the story...
  • The Shield of Heracles:The Complete Poem Translated by Evelyn-White

    25 Jul 2014 | 6:03 am
    The Shield of Heracles (also known as The Shield of Herakles and, in the original, Aspis Herakleous) is a poem of 480 hexameter lines written by an unknown Greek poet in the style of Hesiod (lived 8th century BCE). It deals with the Greek hero Heracles (also known as Hercules) and his nephew Iolaus and their battle with Cycnus, son of the war-god Ares. It is unclear when the action of the poem takes...
  • Alcestis

    24 Jul 2014 | 9:10 am
    Alcestis was the mythical queen of Thessaly, wife of King Admetus, who came to personify the devoted, selfless, woman and wife in ancient Greece. While the story of Admetus' courtship of Alcestis was widely told, she is best known for her devotion to her husband in taking his place in death and her return to life through the intervention of the hero Herakles (better known as Hercules). There are...
 
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