History

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  • Monday 3 March 1661/62

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys
    Samuel Pepys
    3 Mar 2015 | 4:59 pm
    All the morning at home about business with my brother Tom, and then with Mr. Moore, and then I set to make some strict rules for my future practice in my expenses, which I did bind myself in the presence of God by oath to observe upon penalty therein set down, and I do not doubt but hereafter to give a good account of my time and to grow rich, for I do find a great deal more of content in these few days, that I do spend well about my business, than in all the pleasure of a whole week, besides the trouble which I remember I always have after that for the expense of my money. Dined at home,…
  • Revolutionizing the Historic Slot Machine

    History on Air
    Jason
    17 Oct 2014 | 7:01 am
    The one-armed bandit is one of those things that every casino gamer who lived around the early 1900s is familiar with. Well, actually, anyone who sees an old slot machine – whether a novice or experienced gambler – will know how to play it. After all, how much simpler could a machine get? You pull a lever, wait for the reels to stop spinning, and hope that you get matching symbols. The Liberty Bell is considered the godfather of the modern slot machines. It was created by Charles Fey, a car mechanic based in San Francisco, in 1895. It is a three-reel model that is still used in some…
  • 10 Incredible History Pictures pt. 3

    History Now
    1 Feb 2015 | 10:16 am
    1) German soldiers enciphering a message on an Enigma Machine2) Gun safety instruction in Indiana schools, 19563) A scene in post-war Germany: A Fräulein (a Miss, unmarried woman) in an American garden club4) Korea, a tank of 6th Tank Bn. fires on enemy positions in support of the 19th RCT. January 10, 19525) World War I – Trench Rats; ca.19176) Police Dogs Attack Demonstrators, Birmingham Protests, May 19637) Wrecked military vehicles in front of Brandenburg Gate during the Battle of Berlin; ca. 19458) Marcus Sarjeant shoots blanks at Queen…
  • The Real History Behind “The Sound of Music”

    History in the Headlines
    Christopher Klein
    2 Mar 2015 | 10:22 am
    The cast of "The Sound of Music" at the film's 1965 premiere. (Credit: Bruce Bailey/Hulton Archive/Getty Images) 1. The von Trapps only had to cross the railroad tracks behind their villa—not the Alps—to escape the Nazis. In the climactic scene of “The Sound of Music,” the von Trapps flee Salzburg, Austria, under the cover of night and hike across the surrounding mountains to safety in Switzerland. Had they scaled the Alps in real life, however, the von Trapps would have crossed into Nazi Germany, not neutral Switzerland, which was approximately 200 miles away.
  • Remembering Lincoln’s Second Inauguration, 150 Years Later

    History in the Headlines
    Sarah Pruitt
    4 Mar 2015 | 8:02 am
    Abraham Lincoln delivers his second inaugural address at the U.S. Capitol on March 4, 1865, with John Wilkes Booth (upper right) among the crowd looking on. (Credit: Library of Congress) Barely six months earlier, Abraham Lincoln’s election to a second term as president had been anything but a foregone conclusion. By the summer of 1864, the Civil War stretched into its fourth year, and Union and Confederate troops seemed mired in a bloody stalemate. Lincoln’s prospects for reelection looked dim; some of his fellow Republicans threatened to jump ship and back a third-party candidate, John…
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    History in the Headlines

  • Remembering Lincoln’s Second Inauguration, 150 Years Later

    Sarah Pruitt
    4 Mar 2015 | 8:02 am
    Abraham Lincoln delivers his second inaugural address at the U.S. Capitol on March 4, 1865, with John Wilkes Booth (upper right) among the crowd looking on. (Credit: Library of Congress) Barely six months earlier, Abraham Lincoln’s election to a second term as president had been anything but a foregone conclusion. By the summer of 1864, the Civil War stretched into its fourth year, and Union and Confederate troops seemed mired in a bloody stalemate. Lincoln’s prospects for reelection looked dim; some of his fellow Republicans threatened to jump ship and back a third-party candidate, John…
  • 10 Things You Should Know About the Appalachian Trail

    Jesse Greenspan
    3 Mar 2015 | 4:40 am
    Credit: WerksMedia/Stockphoto.com 1. The Trail stretches across 14 states. Running from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mount Katahdin in Maine, the Appalachian Trail follows the Appalachian mountain range through 14 states, including all but three of the original 13 colonies. Over a quarter of the path is in Virginia alone, prompting some exasperated thru-hikers to come down with what they call the “Virginia Blues.” West Virginia, on the other hand, hosts only four miles of the Trail, whereas Maryland contains the second-shortest segment (41 miles) and Connecticut the third-shortest (51…
  • The Real History Behind “The Sound of Music”

    Christopher Klein
    2 Mar 2015 | 10:22 am
    The cast of "The Sound of Music" at the film's 1965 premiere. (Credit: Bruce Bailey/Hulton Archive/Getty Images) 1. The von Trapps only had to cross the railroad tracks behind their villa—not the Alps—to escape the Nazis. In the climactic scene of “The Sound of Music,” the von Trapps flee Salzburg, Austria, under the cover of night and hike across the surrounding mountains to safety in Switzerland. Had they scaled the Alps in real life, however, the von Trapps would have crossed into Nazi Germany, not neutral Switzerland, which was approximately 200 miles away.
  • Historian Seeks Death Certificate to End Billy the Kid Rumors

    Christopher Klein
    27 Feb 2015 | 10:50 am
    Poster for the 1925 movie "Billy the Kid." (Credit: Buyenlarge/Getty Images) As midnight approached on the night of July 14, 1881, Pat Garrett’s posse closed in on the most wanted man in the West. After three months of searching, the Lincoln County sheriff had received a tip that the gunslinger who had escaped jail—as well as a date with the noose—was holed up in the small town of Fort Sumner, New Mexico. Seeking information on the fugitive’s whereabouts from one of Fort Sumner’s leading citizens, Garrett entered the open door of Peter Maxwell’s residence like a cooling…
  • Ancient Mortuary That Boiled, Defleshed Corpses Unearthed

    Christopher Klein
    26 Feb 2015 | 9:05 am
    Remains found at the Khonkho Wankane site. (Credit: Scott C. Smith) Nearly 2,000 years ago, trade caravans and llama drovers crisscrossed the foothills of the Andes Mountains near the southern shores of Lake Titicaca in present-day Bolivia. Among the sporadic outposts frequented by the nomads was the religious and political center of Khonkho Wankane, and a new study published in the current issue of the journal Antiquity reveals that the itinerant populations who frequented the settlement between 200 B.C. and A.D. 500 once brought their dead in tow so that the corpses could be ritually…
 
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    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Tuesday 4 March 1661/62

    Samuel Pepys
    4 Mar 2015 | 4:59 pm
    At the office all the morning, dined at home at noon, and then to the office again in the afternoon to put things in order there, my mind being very busy in settling the office to ourselves, I having now got distinct offices for the other two. By and by Sir W. Pen and I and my wife in his coach to Moore Fields, where we walked a great while, though it was no fair weather and cold; and after our walk we went to the Pope’s Head, and eat cakes and other fine things, and so home, and I up to my chamber to read and write, and so to bed. Read the annotations
  • Monday 3 March 1661/62

    Samuel Pepys
    3 Mar 2015 | 4:59 pm
    All the morning at home about business with my brother Tom, and then with Mr. Moore, and then I set to make some strict rules for my future practice in my expenses, which I did bind myself in the presence of God by oath to observe upon penalty therein set down, and I do not doubt but hereafter to give a good account of my time and to grow rich, for I do find a great deal more of content in these few days, that I do spend well about my business, than in all the pleasure of a whole week, besides the trouble which I remember I always have after that for the expense of my money. Dined at home,…
  • Sunday 2 March 1661/62

    Samuel Pepys
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:59 pm
    (Lord’s day). With my mind much eased talking long in bed with my wife about our frugall life for the time to come, proposing to her what I could and would do if I were worth 2,000l., that is, be a knight, and keep my coach, which pleased her,1 and so I do hope we shall hereafter live to save something, for I am resolved to keep myself by rules from expenses. To church in the morning: none in the pew but myself. So home to dinner, and after dinner came Sir William and talked with me till church time, and then to church, where at our going out I was at a loss by Sir W. Pen’s…
  • Saturday 1 March 1661/62

    Samuel Pepys
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:59 pm
    This morning I paid Sir W. Batten 40l., which I have owed him this half year, having borrowed it of him. Then to the office all the morning, so dined at home, and after dinner comes my uncle Thomas, with whom I had some high words of difference, but ended quietly, though I fear I shall do no good by fair means upon him. Thence my wife and I by coach, first to see my little picture that is a drawing, and thence to the Opera, and there saw “Romeo and Juliet,” the first time it was ever acted; but it is a play of itself the worst that ever I heard in my life, and the worst acted that…
  • Friday 28 February 1661/62

    Samuel Pepys
    28 Feb 2015 | 4:59 pm
    The boy failing to call us up as I commanded, I was angry, and resolved to whip him for that and many other faults, to-day. Early with Sir W. Pen by coach to Whitehall, to the Duke of York’s chamber, and there I presented him from my Lord a fine map of Tangier, done by one Captain Beckman, a Swede, that is with my Lord. We staid looking it over a great while with the Duke after he was ready. Thence I by water to the Painter’s, and there sat again for my face in little, and thence home to dinner, and so at home all the afternoon. Then came Mr. Moore and staid and talked with me,…
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    History in the News

  • Clinton ran own computer system for her official emails

    4 Mar 2015 | 2:49 pm
    " Hillary Rodham Clinton ran her own personal computer system for handling emails while serving as secretary of state, according to Internet records reviewed by The Associated Press. The practice offered a measure of privacy to one of the world's most scrutinized women, but could subject her to more criticism ahead of a likely presidential campaign.
  • Voices: Hillary Clinton may be her own worst enemy

    4 Mar 2015 | 10:44 am
    The startling disclosure this week that she exclusively used a private e-mail account to conduct business when she was secretary of State - just the latest in a string of negative stories - has fueled questions about Clinton's vulnerabilities as a candidate and her instincts as a pol. Even before announcing she will run, she is mired in the sort of distracting controversies that have marked her tenure in public life and that of her husband, former president Bill Clinton.
  • President for a day: The bizarre story of David Atchison

    4 Mar 2015 | 6:34 am
    Today we know Inauguration Day as Jan. 20, but it didn't used to be. In fact, up until 1933, United States presidents were sworn into office on March 4 - the date the Constitution was declared into effect by the 1st U.S. Congress in 1789.
  • Fed Up with the Battle of the Bulge.

    4 Mar 2015 | 3:30 am
    In the last 30 years obesity has doubled and become an epidemic in the United States. "Fed Up" is a documentary from the producer of An Inconvenient Truth, Laurie David; Filmmaker Stephanie Soechtig and narrated by journalist Katie Couric.
  • Leroy Says He And Nia Are The Bill Clinton And Monica Lewinsky Of 'The Challenge'

    3 Mar 2015 | 11:25 pm
    A 1998 affair involving a White House intern amounted to the impeachment of the 42nd President of the United States, but a similar tryst has led to nothing but greatness between a certain pair of "Challenge" exes. Leroy and Nia, who allegedly hooked up on "Free Agents," have been flying high on "Battle of the Exes 2," notching a pair of Dome wins and a victory in the "Speed Dating" mission.
 
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    History on Air

  • Two Gun Hart

    Jason
    5 Feb 2015 | 8:04 pm
    Two Gun Hart The author, Mr. McArthur, contacted me via email and told me about his new book coming out about Al Capone’s brother.  I didn’t know any of this and thought it was very interesting.  I knew my readers would enjoy this interesting tid-bit of information too!  In the interest of full disclosure Jeff is sending me a book.  Jeff gave me this little article to wet your appetite.  Enjoy! Richard Hart was a decorated veteran of World War I, an acrobat from wild west shows, a BIA agent, and one of the greatest Prohibition officers in the country. Though it was the 1920s,…
  • Book Review: Bold by Peter Diamandis

    Jason
    3 Dec 2014 | 5:09 pm
    I’ve just started reading Bold by Peter Diamandis and I’m already hooked.  It is a fascinating book.  In the first chapter he mentioned the company Quirky, that helps inventors get their products into the market. 3D Printing And now, in chapter two I’m reading about the company 3D Systems. They make 3D printers and I want one of those so bad now!  Only a thousand dollars.  Very cool stuff!  Did you know those Invisalign braces are all 3D printed per person? Made in Space creates 3D printers that are being used in the International Space Station!  Also, discovered…
  • Revolutionizing the Historic Slot Machine

    Jason
    17 Oct 2014 | 7:01 am
    The one-armed bandit is one of those things that every casino gamer who lived around the early 1900s is familiar with. Well, actually, anyone who sees an old slot machine – whether a novice or experienced gambler – will know how to play it. After all, how much simpler could a machine get? You pull a lever, wait for the reels to stop spinning, and hope that you get matching symbols. The Liberty Bell is considered the godfather of the modern slot machines. It was created by Charles Fey, a car mechanic based in San Francisco, in 1895. It is a three-reel model that is still used in some…
  • Sinclair ZX81

    Jason
    5 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    Sinclair ZX81 I wasn’t lucky enough to own a Sinclair when I was younger.  When the Sinclair ZX81 was released on March 5, 1981, I was only two years old.  Although, my father a fellow geek did give me his old Compaq portable when I was old enough to use it.  It was released two years later in January 1983.  But enough of my childhood memories this post is about the Sinclair.  The ZX81 was originally released only in the United Kingdom in March 1981 and later came to the shores of the US as the Timex Sinclair 1000.  It was designed to be a home computer.  It was designed on the cheap…
  • USS Cyclops disappears in Bermuda Triangle

    Jason
    4 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    USS Cyclops I’m a sucker for a Bermuda Triangle story, and this one fits the bill.  On March 4, 1918 USS Navy ship Cyclops set out for Baltimore.  She was heading there most likely to make repairs as her starboard engine had a cracked cylinder and in the previous port water had been seen above the Plimsoll line, the line on the hull that marks the legal limit to which a ship sits in the water.  The Cyclops was a collier, which is a cargo ship mostly used by the Navy to haul coal.  It was launched on May 7, 1910.  Cyclops was last known to be traveling through the Bermuda Triangle when…
 
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    african american history - Google News

  • Honoring the African American Experience: The White House Celebrates Black ... - The White House (blog)

    4 Mar 2015 | 8:44 am
    The White House (blog)Honoring the African American Experience: The White House Celebrates Black The White House (blog)In 1926, the great historian and author Carter G. Woodson pioneered "Negro History Week" — a time set aside to honor African Americans and their contributions to our history. "If a race has no history, it has no worthwhile tradition," Woodson once wrote.Why We Need Black History MonthHuffington PostDistinguised Professor Weems dicusses his passion of African American historyWichita State SunflowerWH Celebrates African American History MonthTown HallThe…
  • Roots: African-American history showcased - Spartan Daily

    4 Mar 2015 | 2:05 am
    Roots: African-American history showcasedSpartan DailyDance and song paraded through the Student Union Theater Friday at the first ever Black History Month Cultural Showcase at San Jose State, where different cultures of Africa were celebrated. A group of students from different organizations and clubs on ...
  • Scholar of African American history in West Virginia to deliver public lecture ... - HNN Huntingtonnews.net

    4 Mar 2015 | 1:07 am
    Scholar of African American history in West Virginia to deliver public lecture HNN Huntingtonnews.netHUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Joe William Trotter, a prominent scholar and native West Virginian, will speak at Marshall University Tuesday, March 10, on the topic "Coal, Class, and Color: The African American History of the Southern American Coalfields.
  • Marshall will host scholar of African American history - Daily Sentinel

    2 Mar 2015 | 12:14 pm
    Marshall will host scholar of African American historyDaily SentinelHUNTINGTON, W.Va. — Dr. Joe William Trotter, a prominent scholar and native West Virginia, will speak at Marshall University Tuesday, March 10, on the topic “Coal, Class, and Color: The African American History of the Southern American Coalfields.”.and more »
  • African American History Challenge Bowl Winners - The Chattanoogan

    2 Mar 2015 | 8:09 am
    The ChattanooganAfrican American History Challenge Bowl WinnersThe ChattanooganCongratulations goes to Hixson High School students Nick Hill and DeShae Williams, 1st place winners of the 2015 African American History Challenge Bowl. They will compete in the 100 Black Men of America's National Championship in Houston, Tx., June ...
 
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    History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

  • March 05, 1963: Hula-Hoop patented

    4 Mar 2015 | 9:00 pm
    On this day in 1963, the Hula-Hoop, a hip-swiveling toy that became a huge fad across America when it was first marketed by Wham-O in 1958, is patented by the company’s co-founder, Arthur “Spud” Melin. An estimated 25 million Hula-Hoops were sold in its first four months of production alone. In 1948, friends Arthur Melin and Richard Knerr founded a company in California to sell a slingshot they created to shoot meat up to falcons they used for hunting. The company’s name, Wham-O, came from the sound the slingshots supposedly made. Wham-O eventually branched out from…
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    The New York History Blog

  • Corruption in the Legislature: A Sense of Déjà Vu?

    Bruce Dearstyne
    4 Mar 2015 | 12:50 pm
    The indictment of former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver on federal corruption charges is the latest manifestation of corruption in the New York State legislature. Since 2000, about 25 state lawmakers have left office because of criminal or ethical issues. U. S. Attorney Preet Bhahara, who brought the charges against Silver, says the legislature is a […]
  • Who Really Wrote The Declaration of Independence?

    Liz Covart
    4 Mar 2015 | 9:00 am
    Do you know who authored the Declaration of Independence? If you answered “Thomas Jefferson,” you would be wrong. Jefferson merely wrote the first draft of a document others created. In this episode of the “Ben Franklin’s World” podcast, Danielle Allen, Foundation Professor at the Institute of Advanced Study and author of Our Declaration: A Reading […]
  • NYC Hip-Hop History Photograph Exhibit Planned

    Editorial Staff
    4 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    The Museum of the City of New York is presenting HIP-HOP REVOLUTION: Photographs by Janette Beckman, Joe Conzo, and Martha Cooper, an exhibition that shows the historic early days of hip-hop culture and music, with its roots firmly in New York, and how it evolved towards the worldwide phenomenon it is today. Bringing together for […]
  • Grant Awarded To Help Save Civil War Memorial

    Editorial Staff
    3 Mar 2015 | 1:00 pm
    The Landmark Society of Western New York has awarded a $2,500 grant to promote an effort to save the Cattaraugus County Civil War Memorial & Historical Building in Little Valley, NY.  The grant was made to the Citizens Advocating Memorial Preservation (CAMP), a local citizen group formed to stop plans to demolish 100-year-old building dedicated to […]
  • Historic Saranac Lake Hires Programs Coordinator

    Editorial Staff
    3 Mar 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Historic Saranac Lake (HSL) has announced that Chessie Monks will serve as the new Public Programs Coordinator for the Saranac Laboratory Museum. Monks has a master’s degree in Library Science with a concentration in Archives Management from Simmons College in Boston. In a statement to the press HSL Executive Director Amy Catania said, “The addition […]
 
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    Toptenz.net

  • 10 Cool Facts about Antarctica

    Shannon Harris
    4 Mar 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Antarctica is a place of unbelievable wonder and mystery. Of the seven continents it’s the most recently discovered, the least hospitable, the least inhabited and the least explored. It’s also, as you’re about to learn, one of the most fascinating places in the world. 10. It Gets Bigger — Way Bigger Antarctica’s sea ice is […] The post 10 Cool Facts about Antarctica appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Top 10 Fighters In Comics (Outside of Marvel And DC)

    Jim Ciscell
    3 Mar 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Before you start yelling, we established some ground rules for this list. The beings had to be Earth bound. Their original incarnation had to be outside of Marvel and DC. Any superpowers would only be a natural ability or used for the enhancement of a trained fighting style. The fighting ability had to be in […] The post Top 10 Fighters In Comics (Outside of Marvel And DC) appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Reasons the Byzantine Empire Was Among the Most Successful in History

    Adrian Chirila
    2 Mar 2015 | 9:10 pm
    You’d see a lot of changes when looking at a map of present day Europe and comparing it to a 30 year old one. Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine and the Baltic States were all part of the USSR. Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia were still states. Go back even further and the map looks even stranger. Putting all […] The post 10 Reasons the Byzantine Empire Was Among the Most Successful in History appeared first on Toptenz.net.
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    History Of Macedonia

  • Η Βεργίνα δεν σταματάει να μας εκπλήσσει

    Stern
    4 Mar 2015 | 11:46 am
    της Γιώτας Μυρτσιώτη Μπροστά σε νέα μυστήρια βρίσκονται οι αρχαιολόγοι της Εφορείας Αρχαιοτήτων Ημαθίας που προσπαθούν να ερμηνεύσουν τα πλούσια ευρήματα ασύλητων και συλημένων τάφων του 4ου αι.π.Χ. Είκοσι συνολικά ήρθαν στο φως το περασμένο καλοκαίρι κατά τη διάρκεια ανάδειξης της νεκρόπολης Αιγών (έργο ΕΣΠΑ) και, όπως…
  • Αρχαιολογικός χώρος των Φιλίππων, υποψήφιο μνημείο Παγκόσμιας Κληρονομιάς της UNESCO

    Stern
    4 Mar 2015 | 12:59 am
    Εκδήλωση για την παρουσίαση της υποψηφιότητας του Αρχαιολογικού Χώρου των Φιλίππων στον κατάλογο των Μνημείων της UNESCO πραγματοποιήθηκε στο Ίδρυμα Β. και Μ. Θεοχαράκη με την παρουσία ακαδημαϊκών, βουλευτών και εκπροσώπων της τοπικής και περιφερειακής αυτοδιοίκησης. Τα μνημεία που συγκαταλέγονται στον κατάλογο της…
  • Αμφίπολη, απουσίες και ανατροπές

    Stern
    3 Mar 2015 | 11:37 am
    της Γιώτας Μυρτσιώτη Αναμφίβολα είναι το πιο εντυπωσιακό εύρημα της φετινής ανασκαφικής σοδειάς. Ως εκ τούτου ήταν και η πιο αναμενόμενη ανακοίνωση στην αρχαιολογική συνάντηση Θεσσαλονίκης. Όλοι την περίμεναν. Τόσο ο επιστημονικός κόσμος όσο και το κοινό, που καταβρόχθιζε καθημερινά και επί μήνες κάθε λέξη του υπουργείου…
  • Αρχαιολογικό Μουσείο Αιανής : “Χρυσοί στέφανοι εκ Μακεδονίας”

    Stern
    2 Mar 2015 | 11:46 pm
    Τα χρυσά στεφάνια της Μακεδονίας (η περιοχή του αρχαίου ελληνικού κόσμου που «έδωσε» και εξακολουθεί να «δίνει» στις ανασκαφές της, τον μεγαλύτερο ίσως αριθμό μετάλλινων στεφανιών, τα οποία χρονολογούνται από τα μέσα του 4ου έως τα μέσα του 2ου αιώνα π.Χ.) ταξιδεύουν και εκτίθενται στην Αιανή της Κοζάνης. “Χρυσοί στέφανοι εκ…
  • Ύπουλο χτύπημα υπέρ των Σκοπίων από το Ευρωκοινοβούλιο

    Stern
    2 Mar 2015 | 1:23 pm
    Ύπουλο χτύπημα απέναντι στην Ελλάδα για το ζήτημα της ονομασίας της ΠΓΔΜ κατάφερε το Ευρωπαϊκό Κοινοβούλιο. Σε ένα ψήφισμα που πέρασε την προηγούμενη εβδομάδα και δεν έχει πάρει ακόμα δημοσιότητα, η λέξη « Μακεδονία» ή παράγωγο της χρησιμοποιείται δύο φορές για να περιγράψει τη βόρειο γείτονά μας. Συγκεκριμένα: α) Στην…
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    Claire Gebben

  • Marriage under the Code Napoleon

    clairegebben
    19 Feb 2015 | 11:25 am
    In our family tree, 19th century ancestor Johann Philipp Harm, the father of Michael Harm, married twice. Johann Philipp’s first marriage in 1827 was to a woman named Elisabetha Harm Bruch, a widow more than ten years older than he was, and his first cousin. This first wife passed away in 1832, childless, when Johann Philipp Harm was just 36 years old. “We think this first marriage was about property,” Günter told me on my first visit to Freinsheim in 1988. “To keep Elisabetha’s property in the family.” An 1807 edition of the Code Napoleon on display in…
  • Deductive reasoning, aka reading the classics

    clairegebben
    6 Feb 2015 | 11:16 am
    Confessional moment: Yes! I’m working on my next novel. This one is about Scottish immigrants in the 18th century. And just like the initial phase of my research for The Last of the Blacksmiths (German immigrants in the 19th century), I’ve started by reading some classics of the day. (See one of my earliest blogposts here, Call me a schlemiel) This time, instead of Moby-Dick, I’m devouring Kidnapped! by Robert Louis Stevenson. Until I downloaded this classic to my digital bookshelf, my knowledge of this author extended as far as the recurring crossword puzzle clue: Author of…
  • Name change for Family Chronicle

    clairegebben
    29 Jan 2015 | 4:17 pm
    January/February 2015 issue Family Chronicle: A how-to-guide for tracing your ancestors recently arrived at my door, and I couldn’t be more pleased. I learned about the publication when giving at talk at South Whidbey Genealogical Society. It’s a Canadian magazine with 80-percent distribution in the U.S. You’ll find it at many libraries and genealogical societies, and also in the magazine section at Barnes & Noble. And, I’m proud to announce, my article: “My Ancestor Was a Blacksmith!” appears in the January/February 2015 issue.     But…
  • The Five Points slum

    clairegebben
    9 Jan 2015 | 12:34 pm
    When I first learned my German immigrant ancestor Michael Harm arrived in New York on June 30, 1857, I thought I’d have trouble digging up some newsworthy event to write about. Au contraire. Or rather, ganz im Gegenteil! In the 19th century, New York City had a seriously grungy neighborhood, a notorious slum called the “Five Points.” Conditions in the Five Points –so named because five streets met at one intersection–were so overcrowded it became an “international attraction, drawing such notables as  Charles Dickens, a Russian grand duke, Davy…
  • Kings of Kallstadt

    clairegebben
    8 Dec 2014 | 4:43 pm
    On the first weekend of my arrival in Freinsheim this past September, my relatives and I sallied forth to hike the vineyards in celebration of the annual Freinsheim Weinwanderung. Ina, Manfred, Matthias and Lenny (the collie) on the first night of the Weinwanderung Friday evening, as we headed out of town to ascend to a hilltop vantage point and await the opening night fireworks (an occasion that included the sampling of several wines), my relatives encountered friends of theirs, so we stopped to talk. “Here is our American relative, Claire Gebben,” they said (I think),…
 
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    History of Massachusetts »

  • Reverend John Cotton: Puritan Reformist

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    17 Feb 2015 | 7:19 am
    John Cotton was a clergymen from England who moved to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1633. John Cotton’s Early Life: Cotton was born on December 4, 1585, in Derby, England to Rowland Cotton, a lawyer, and Mary Hubert. He attended … Continue reading →
  • Anne Hutchinson: Religious Rebel

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    26 Jan 2015 | 7:57 am
    Anne Hutchinson was a Puritan religious leader and midwife who moved from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. Facts about Anne Hutchinson: Hutchinson was born Anne Marbury in Alford, Lincolnshire, England on July 20, 1591 and was the … Continue reading →
  • History of the Massachusetts Bay Colony

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    5 Jan 2015 | 10:17 am
    Massachusetts Bay Colony was a British settlement on the East Coast of North America in the 17th and 18th century. It was located in what is now modern-day central New England. Who Founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony? Massachusetts Bay Colony … Continue reading →
  • The Sons of Liberty: Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    24 Nov 2014 | 8:35 am
    The Sons of Liberty was a group of political dissidents that formed in the North American British colonies during the early days of the American Revolution. The original purpose of the Sons of Liberty was to protest the passage of … Continue reading →
  • Elizabeth Proctor: The Salem Witch Trials Widow

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    21 Jul 2014 | 7:06 am
    Elizabeth Proctor, wife of Salem Village farmer John Proctor, was accused of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials in 1692. The Proctors were a wealthy family who lived on a large rented farm on the outskirts of Salem Village, in … Continue reading →
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    Annoyz View

  • Mystery Regarding Erwin Rommel’s Suicide

    annoyzview
    8 Feb 2015 | 8:30 pm
    Erwin Rommel was a hero of Nazi Germany during World War II. When World War II came knocking, Rommel was one of the veterans of World War I. He had already received Pour le Merite award for his exploits on the Italian front of World War I. He was, for some time, even the favorite of Adolf Hitler. He gained in prominence as the Commander of Panzer Division that had smashed the French resistance during World War II. He was sent to the African front to command the Afrika Korps. The tactical genius and ability to motivate the troops made him an instant hero. When the news of Erwin’s exploits…
  • Was Alexander the Great a Unifier or Subjugator?

    annoyzview
    6 Feb 2015 | 8:30 pm
    Much of what we know about Alexander the Great is an account of Ptolemy, who was a childhood friend of the great man. Just like any other ancient hero, Alexander the Great has been depicted like a God like person, a Messiah of the human race. Modern scholars believe that Ptolemy always held a dear place in the heart of Alexander. He was given the desired respect and power. He had no reason to doubt the deeds of Alexander. So, he eulogized the man. Over the years, feathers were added to the cap. Fictional elements were added to Alexander’s tale. None of the past scholars spent time detecting…
  • Was Robinson Crusoe Based on Real Incidents?

    annoyzview
    5 Feb 2015 | 8:30 pm
    Most of the people grow up reading the classic work of Daniel Defoe by the name “Robinson Crusoe”. In this novel Robinson Crusoe is stranded on a small Caribbean Island for nearly 28 years. Defoe was rumored to have based this fictional work on various castaway stories. But research proves that Robinson Crusoe drew heavily from the real life events of Alexander Selkirk, who was contemporary seafarer of the author. Image of Alexander Selkirk as a Young man Alexander Selkirk was the son of a shoemaker and born in Lower Largo, Fife, Scotland in 1676. Sometime in the years between 1693 and 95…
  • Marco Polo and his Tryst with Kublai Khan

    annoyzview
    5 Feb 2015 | 4:31 am
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge starts his unfinished poem Kubla Khan as “In Xanadu did Kubla Khan, a stately pleasure-dome decree…” As the poet revealed the poem was composed one night in a state of opium induced dream after reading a work containing the descriptions of Xanadu. Xanadu was originally the capital of Kublai Khan after he had conquered China. Later on, though the emperor shifted his capital to Dadu, in present day Beijing. Xanadu stayed important as it was the imperial summer city during Kublai Khan’s reign. Coleridge saw Xanadu only in a dream after reading about it, but there…
  • Is Carthage Infanticide Real or Part of Propaganda?

    annoyzview
    3 Feb 2015 | 4:34 am
    Ancient Carthage was a glorious place to be in. It had the riches and a well-built social system. The Phoenician empire was centered on its city-state of Carthage, which is located in present day Gulf of Tunis in North Africa. The empire that was founded in 814 BC quickly grew into prominence. At its heights the Phoenician Empire spanned across Mediterranean Ocean, North Africa to modern day Spain. The empire prospered till third century BC. The history of Carthage is one of constant struggle for lands. They waged wars against the Greeks for control over Sicily and with the Roman Republic for…
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    History of Massachusetts »

  • Reverend John Cotton: Puritan Reformist

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    17 Feb 2015 | 7:19 am
    John Cotton was a clergymen from England who moved to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1633. John Cotton’s Early Life: Cotton was born on December 4, 1585, in Derby, England to Rowland Cotton, a lawyer, and Mary Hubert. He attended … Continue reading →
  • Anne Hutchinson: Religious Rebel

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    26 Jan 2015 | 7:57 am
    Anne Hutchinson was a Puritan religious leader and midwife who moved from England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. Facts about Anne Hutchinson: Hutchinson was born Anne Marbury in Alford, Lincolnshire, England on July 20, 1591 and was the … Continue reading →
  • History of the Massachusetts Bay Colony

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    5 Jan 2015 | 10:17 am
    Massachusetts Bay Colony was a British settlement on the East Coast of North America in the 17th and 18th century. It was located in what is now modern-day central New England. Who Founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony? Massachusetts Bay Colony … Continue reading →
  • The Sons of Liberty: Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    24 Nov 2014 | 8:35 am
    The Sons of Liberty was a group of political dissidents that formed in the North American British colonies during the early days of the American Revolution. The original purpose of the Sons of Liberty was to protest the passage of … Continue reading →
  • Elizabeth Proctor: The Salem Witch Trials Widow

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    21 Jul 2014 | 7:06 am
    Elizabeth Proctor, wife of Salem Village farmer John Proctor, was accused of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials in 1692. The Proctors were a wealthy family who lived on a large rented farm on the outskirts of Salem Village, in … Continue reading →
 
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    Ancient Origins

  • The Sagas of the Icelanders shed light on Golden Age

    Ryan Stone
    4 Mar 2015 | 3:25 am
    The Sagas of the Icelanders have long been preserved as the most comprehensive specimen of the literary culture of the 13th and 14th centuries of Iceland.  In writing these sagas, many attributes of the 10th and 11th centuries were conserved, particularly individual biographies, the history of family feuds, and the overall evolution of the one of the greatest settlements of the Vikings.  Unlike the mythical tales of the Greeks, the Icelandic sagas depict real men and women—real great families—struggling with and overcoming extraordinary circumstances and adventures to forge a new…
  • Stone Age Britons traded with European farmers 8,000 years ago

    Mark Miller
    3 Mar 2015 | 4:38 pm
    Archaeologists have concluded that pre-agricultural Stone Age hunter-gatherers on the Isle of Wight 8,000 years ago obtained domesticated wheat from farmers on the continent of Europe. That is 2,000 years earlier than people were farming in England. English archaeologists said in a paper published in February 2015 in the journal Science that they’ve found evidence of wheat at a Middle Stone Age site at Bouldnor Cliff now underwater off the northern coast of the Isle of Wight, which is located off the south coast of England. One of the researchers, Robin Allaby said the finding of einkorn…
  • Military stronghold for Mongolian Conqueror Genghis Khan Found by Archaeologists

    lizleafloor
    3 Mar 2015 | 2:11 pm
    Scenes depicted in a Chinese medieval travel book gave clues to researchers, helping them locate what is said to be a 13th century military outpost used by Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan. As reported by The Asahi Shimbun, a team of Japanese and Mongolian archaeologists led by Koichi Matsuda, professor emeritus of Mongol Empire history at Osaka International University, has discovered the ruins of a fortress established by the Mongol leader and “commissioned by a close aide to Genghis Khan in 1212.” Read moreSection: NewsHistory & Archaeology
  • Fire Mummies - The Smoked Human Remains of the Kabayan Caves

    mrreese
    3 Mar 2015 | 4:35 am
    Mummification of the deceased is a fairly well-known practice from ancient times. Most notably, the Egyptians utilized a mummification process that led to today’s cliché image of a deceased body covered in gauzy wrappings. The discovery of mummified remains in several caves in the Philippines represents a different type of mummy – the fire mummy. Found in caves in the town of Kabayan, in the Benguet province of the Philippines, the fire mummies are human remains that were preserved through a lengthy dehydration and smoking process. These well-preserved remains have given researchers…
  • Archaeologists find untouched ruins in their search for the Lost City of the Monkey God

    aprilholloway
    2 Mar 2015 | 4:08 pm
    Two years ago, an aerial search of the dense jungle of Honduras fuelled by local legends of a lost ancient city, revealed miles of seemingly man-made features. Announcements quickly spread that archaeologists had found La Ciudad Blanca (“The White City”), otherwise known as the Lost City of the Monkey God. But all they had to go on were vague scans of the jungle below. Now a ground expedition has concluded its investigation and has dramatically revealed that the aerial images did indeed show traces of a lost civilization. National Geographic reports that archaeologists have now discovered…
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    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • Senebkay, first Pharaoh to die in Battle

    25 Feb 2015 | 12:52 pm
    Senebkay's skull shows clear impact marks of an axe In collaboration with the Ministry of Antiquities, a University of Pennsylvania team discovered new evidence on the life and death of pharaoh Senebkay, founder of the 16th Dynasty of the Second Intermediate Period of Egypt. The pharaoh's skeleton's forensic analysis performed by researchers directed by Dr. Josef Wegner indicated that the reason...
  • Taposiris Magna Stele: Another Rosetta Stone

    25 Feb 2015 | 7:00 am
    Stela found at Taposiris Magna, inscribed in Hierglyphic and Demotic side by side. The SCA Archaeological Mission in collaboration with the Catholic University of Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic) working at the Taposiris Magna site succeeded in discovering a limestone stele inscribed with Hieroglyphic and Demotic inscriptions. The Minister of Antiquities, Dr. Eldamaty stated that the discovered...
  • The Divine Gift of Writing

    24 Feb 2015 | 9:31 am
    The gods were responsible for teaching humans how to write. Without their divine involvement, it would have been impossible for us, imperfect mortals, to develop such a valuable and powerful skill. This, and other similar explanations, was the way that most ancient societies accounted for the existence of writing. Itzamn in the Maya Book of the Dead Itzamn, the Mayan god and ruler of heaven...
  • Finding the hidden Naram-Sin rock relief in Iraq

    23 Feb 2015 | 8:30 am
    I was chatting with my uncle about the archaeological reliefs in the Governorate of Sulaymaniyah. The Governorate is part of Iraqi Kurdistan and is about 400 km north-west of Baghdad. He said that he saw a relief in the year 1985 on a top of a mountain, south-west of the city of Sulaymaniyah. The name of the relief, as the local villagers call it, is Naram-Sin (Arabic: ????? ??? ; Kurdish...
  • The Punic-Roman Temple of Antas, Sardinia

    22 Feb 2015 | 9:00 am
    Nestled in the middle of the Iglesiente mountains in the southwestern part of Sardinia, the ruins of the Punic-Roman Temple of Antas offer visitors a truly majestic sight. After lying abandoned for centuries, the temple was discovered in 1838 and extensively restored in 1967. Most impressively, the original Ionic columns were excavated and re-erected. The present visible structure dates to the 3rd century...
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    AncientHistoryLists » AncientHistoryLists

  • Top 14 Decisive Ancient Battles in the History

    Saugat Adhikari
    10 Feb 2015 | 8:17 am
    War was fought for several reasons in the history. Blood was spatter, kingdoms were destroyed,  peoples were slaughtered. Some battle plays a significant role in the history and often remembered throughout the history. Some battle created a new legend that were appraised by generation. Some of the efficient military tactics are still followed that were originated in the Ancient Battle. The ancient military commander like Alexander the Great, Hannibal proved that there is nothing impossible in the battlefield by showing the brilliant strategy in the battlefield. 14. Battle of Platea (479 BC)…
  • Top 10 oldest Art ever discovered

    Saugat Adhikari
    24 Nov 2014 | 6:59 am
    Art has been a part of expression since the evolution of the mankind. The discovery of pre-historic sculptures, cave art suggest that different form of arts were practiced throughout the evolution of mankind. Even though the way of expressing ideas through art was different at that time, it can be predicted that the way of expressing inner emotion through different form of art was existed through the evolution of mankind. It was initially believed that oldest art and partings existed mainly in the Europe. The discovery of the various cave art in Indonesia raised a new question among the…
  • 8 ancient greek painters

    Saugat Adhikari
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:03 pm
    Ancient Greece was one of the richest empire in Art in the ancient world. Their style and architect, was derived by other giant empire like Roman of that era. Sculpture and Architecture were widely popular back then. In Addition, Painting was widely practiced in Ancient Rome. The Greek painter inspired thousands of artists throughout the generation. Here is the list of 8 ancient Greek painters, which techniques and style were adopted throughout the generation. 8. Thales (painter) Often a place on a level with Pheidias and Apelles, Thales was an ancient Greek painter, who is mentioned…
  • 7 Ancient Roman Painters

    Saugat Adhikari
    19 Nov 2014 | 7:03 am
    Painting has always become the way of representing or showcasing different human emotions. The large discovery of the ancient paintings in cave, ancient royal palace, temple by archaeologist suggest that different form of art was quite popular since thousands of years ago . The discovery of the ancient art treasure like “Venus of Berekhat Ram” which was claimed to be of age 230,000 years old suggest that art such as painting was practiced throughout the evolution of the mankind. Unlike any other part of the ancient world, different form of arts is widely practiced in Ancient Rome.
  • Top 12 greatest ancient military commander

    Saugat Adhikari
    18 Nov 2014 | 5:45 am
    “The warrior doesn’t win the war by virtue along”.  Ancient military commander leads thousands of their men in the vicious battle and triumphed over their enemy. Their flourishes speech prior to the battle, inspired thousands of their men in the battlefield, which is still invoked by various historians. Ancient Warfare were completely different than modern warfare. Number of armies and their strength were the primary factor considered to win the war. Some of the ancient military commander confutes it by showing the inconceivable strategy and tactics in the battlefield that are still…
 
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    History Now

  • 10 Incredible History Pictures pt. 5

    17 Feb 2015 | 2:54 am
    1) First known photo of a surfer, Hawaii 1890.2) The writer George Orwell poses with the puppy during the Spanish Civil War. Behind him is Ernest Hemingway (1937)3) Billboards in Times Square (1900)4) 50s Greasers5) 1930's Teen Delinquents6) 8 year old coal miner - 1900's7) Winston Churchill (right) with Canadian Prime Minister Robert Borden in 19128) The final four couples on the Chicago dance marathon. (1930)9) This photo of Beatles dates back to 1957. John Lenon oldest was 16, George Harrison and Paul McCartney had a year less10) American…
  • 10 Incredible History Pictures pt. 4

    14 Feb 2015 | 8:36 am
    1) Crash landing of Grumman F6F Hellcat on flight deck of USS Enterprise, November 19432) Mao Zedong playing ping pong3) 101st Airborne Division jumps near Eindhoven, Holland, September 17, 19444) Gala Dali serves as canvas for Salvador Dali. Spain, 19425) USS Nautilus entering New York harbor6) Vladimir Komarov - the man that fell from space7) Men in a Tattoo Parlor, circa 1920s8) Shipwreck of the sailing ship Montgomeryshire at Tonga 19079) British Airship R33 preparing for launch, March 1919. Barlow, Yorkshire10) Douglas A-20G Havoc 43-9432…
  • 10 Incredible History Pictures pt. 3

    1 Feb 2015 | 10:16 am
    1) German soldiers enciphering a message on an Enigma Machine2) Gun safety instruction in Indiana schools, 19563) A scene in post-war Germany: A Fräulein (a Miss, unmarried woman) in an American garden club4) Korea, a tank of 6th Tank Bn. fires on enemy positions in support of the 19th RCT. January 10, 19525) World War I – Trench Rats; ca.19176) Police Dogs Attack Demonstrators, Birmingham Protests, May 19637) Wrecked military vehicles in front of Brandenburg Gate during the Battle of Berlin; ca. 19458) Marcus Sarjeant shoots blanks at Queen…
  • 10 Incredible History Pictures pt. 2

    25 Jan 2015 | 7:22 am
    1) RMS Queen Mary in drydock at Southampton, England, prior to her maiden voyage in 19362) Golden Gate Bridge construction. 1937.3) British 8-inch Howitzers in Action4) A civilian fighter armed with an AK-47 chases Securitate agents, Romanian Revolution, 1989.5) German soldier cleans his rifle in the short break between battles at Stalingrad USSR, Autumn 19426) Muhammad Ali & Malcolm X, New York, 1963.7) Nazi Rally, 1934 - Nuremberg, Germany 8) RMS Olympic in dazzle camouflage while in service as a troopship during WWI9) The end of WW2 is…
  • 10 Incredible History Pictures

    23 Jan 2015 | 3:28 am
    1) Boy soldiers captured in the Battle for Berlin (1945)2) D-Day Landings, Omaha Beach, Normandy France, June 19443) Fidel Castro plays baseball in Havana, 19594) 1952 enterprise police scooter5)  Medics loading a patient into the MEDVAC helicopter during the Vietnam War6) An F-4N Phantom II of Fighter Squadron (VF) 21 pictured in flight over the carrier Coral Sea (CV 43) in 1983.7) Russian armed with PPSh-41 machine pistol plucks German soldier out of a sewer during the vicious fight for Berlin, April 19458) Soldier flipping off the camera on an U.S…
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    New Historian

  • The Anniversary of Rosa Luxemburg’s Birth

    Daryl Worthington
    4 Mar 2015 | 11:26 am
    On 5th March 1871, Rosa Luxemburg, the future leader of a revolutionary faction of the German Socialist Party, was born in Zamość, Poland. Luxemburg is remembered as a key figure in the history of Socialist political thought, one who challenged the implementation of Socialism and Communism, as much as the systems of Capitalist societies. When Luxemburg was born, Zamość was still a part of Russia. This sense of existing between Germany and Russia was a theme that would resurface throughout Luxemburg’s life. Along with her Polish identity, her politics and writings were defined by…
  • Lost City Discovered in Honduras

    Adam Steedman Thake
    4 Mar 2015 | 10:51 am
    A recent expedition deep into the rainforest of Honduras has made a remarkable discovery, a mysterious lost city belonging to an unknown culture. Christopher Fisher, an archaeologist from Colorado State University, led the expedition which had hoped to find the legendary La Ciudad Blanca, or White City, a settlement said to have contained incredible wealth. It has been claimed that the White City is simply a mythical construct; nevertheless, many have tried to find it. Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés stated he had received ‘trustworthy’ information on a region of extreme…
  • Late Miocene Caiman Had Strongest Jaws in History

    Irina Slav
    4 Mar 2015 | 10:33 am
    Research into the biological characteristics and lifestyle of an ancient caiman-like animal that lived in the late Miocene period has determined that its jaw strength was substantially greater than that of the Tyrannosaurus Rex, usually considered the mightiest predator of ancient times. The Purussaurus brasiliensis, as the caiman-like species is known, had a bite force of between 7 and 11.5 tonnes per square inch – a lot more than the bite force of the T-Rex, estimated to have been around 5.8 tonnes per square inch. The creature with the deadliest bite on land and water, however,…
  • Louis “Lepke” Buchalter Gets the Chair

    Daryl Worthington
    3 Mar 2015 | 4:18 pm
    On March 4th 1944, one of the most notorious crime bosses in US History was executed by electric chair at Sing Sing Prison in New York. Louis “Lepke” Buchalter’s execution gave him the distinction of being the only US mob boss to receive the death penalty from the US Government. Born in the Lower East Side of Manhattan in February 1897, Buchalter’s family were Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. His mother gave him the nickname “Lepkeleh”, which means ‘little Louis’ in Yiddish, it was later shortened to “Lepke”. Following the…
  • Fifth-Century Native American Pendant Found

    Adam Steedman Thake
    3 Mar 2015 | 3:29 pm
    An unusual Native American item has been found in Ohio. During some utility maintenance, a work crew unearthed a surprising find: a Native American pendant dating to the fifth century CE. The pendant was discovered when workmen were digging a trench in the suburban Cincinnati village of Newtown, Ohio. The shell pendant in the style of a gorget – a decorative plate hanging from the neck – is decorated with an engraving of an as-yet unidentified animal. A curator from the Cincinnati Museum has stated that gorgets with animal depictions are scarce, only about eight from a similar…
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    Milling Minutes

  • Historic Mill Reads

    chapmansmill
    2 Mar 2015 | 6:53 am
      Read About the Mill Today is National Read Across America Day.  So what are we reading at the Mill? Well, our research library wouldn’t be complete without the following titles: Beverley (Chapman’s) Mill, Thoroughfare Gap, Virginia : a history and preservation plan / by Frances Lillian Jones.  This is our go-to reference book when it comes to Mill history giving an in-depth history of the Mill from its founding to 1981.  An addendum written in 2006 includes information on the 1998 fire and TTMAC’s efforts to stabilize the structure.  The full book may be viewed…
  • Seven Things to See at the Chapman – Beverley Mill

    chapmansmill
    23 Feb 2015 | 2:17 am
    Tour the Mill this weekend! Planning to visit the Mill this weekend? Be sure to look for these seven features while you’re there.  You can even download our self-guided tour HERE. 1) The Chapman – Beverley Mill Originally owned by Jonathan and Nathaniel Chapman, the Mill was constructed around 1742 by slaves who stacked quartzite stone quarried from the mountain above. The Mill was destroyed by fire in 1858 and again during the Civil War. The Beverley family acquired the property shortly after the Civil War and re-established the Mill as a major economic center within the community.
  • Keeping the Mill’s Walls Standing

    chapmansmill
    16 Feb 2015 | 1:10 am
    Stabilizing the Chapman – Beverley Mill Walls   Turn the Mill Around Campaign faced a very big problem when it took over management of the Mill in 1998. The fire that year had left the walls of the structure fragile and in danger of collapse.  TTMAC contacted numerous companies about stabilizing the ruins, but each considered the walls too delicate to save. Workers Installing Cintec Anchors Finally, TTMAC contacted Cintec, a preservation business known for stabilizing European castle ruins. Cintec devised a plan to strengthen the walls one at a time. Beginning on the South wall…
  • Archaeology Map

    chapmansmill
    9 Feb 2015 | 5:01 am
    Mill Site Map with Shovel Test Pits Since our archaeological program began in earnest around 2010, our crew of talented volunteers has dug dozens of shovel test pits (STP’s) and logged an estimated 10,000 artifacts.  The site has produced a wealth of items dating from the prehistoric period through the late 20th Century.  In fact, the Mill has proved to be so artifact-rich our crew is still hard at work cataloging pieces excavated in the 2013 dig season! In advance of our plans to install walking trails this Summer, we compiled the above map which illustrates the positions of the…
  • Chapman’s Mill Video

    chapmansmill
    2 Feb 2015 | 5:40 am
    Turn the Mill Around Campaign recently uploaded a new video to our YouTube channel.  The video includes images – some of which we’ve never posted before -of the Mill both before and after the 1998 fire.  It also includes clips from some of our favorite Mill – related YouTube videos. For this short piece we were excited to work with local artist Jiamie Pyles who provided our hauntingly beautiful soundtrack. We hope you enjoy! Have a photo of the mill you’d like to share?  We’re always looking for historic and modern images of the mill!  Contact Frances…
 
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    Historical England

  • Image Of The Day – Worcester Cathedral – The Rood Screen

    Historical England
    4 Mar 2015 | 1:51 am
    Image Of The Day – Worcester Cathedral Today’s Historical England Image Of The Day features the Rood Screen of Worcester Cathedral. Check back tomorrow for a new image! Thanks The Historical England Team The post Image Of The Day – Worcester Cathedral – The Rood Screen appeared first on Historical England.
  • Image Of The Day – Norwich Cathedral

    Historical England
    3 Mar 2015 | 5:15 am
    Image Of The Day – Norwich Cathedral Today’s Historical England Image Of The Day features Norwich Cathedral. Check back tomorrow for a new image! Thanks The Historical England Team The post Image Of The Day – Norwich Cathedral appeared first on Historical England.
  • Image Of The Day – Lincoln Cathedral – Candlesticks

    Historical England
    2 Mar 2015 | 2:15 am
    Image Of The Day – Lincoln Cathedral – The Candlesticks Today’s Historical England Image Of The Day features the Candlesticks of Lincoln Cathedral. Check back tomorrow for a new image! Thanks The Historical England Team The post Image Of The Day – Lincoln Cathedral – Candlesticks appeared first on Historical England.
  • Image Of The Day – Gloucester Cathedral – The Quire

    Historical England
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:12 pm
    Image Of The Day – Gloucester Cathedral – The Quire Today’s Historical England Image Of The Day features the Quire of Gloucester Cathedral. Check back tomorrow for a new image! Thanks The Historical England Team The post Image Of The Day – Gloucester Cathedral – The Quire appeared first on Historical England.
  • Cathedral Music

    Historical England
    26 Feb 2015 | 4:15 am
    Cathedral Music We would like to show you a couple of images that have been used by a publication called Cathedral Music that we have worked with in the past. The magazine is very good and full of useful information and articles. You can find their website below. Official Site   The post Cathedral Music appeared first on Historical England.
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