History

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  • The Capture of the Lindbergh Baby Kidnapper, 80 Years Ago

    History in the Headlines
    Christopher Klein
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:59 am
    Shortly before 10 a.m. on September 15, 1934, a dark blue Dodge sedan pulled up to the gasoline pumps at a Warner-Quinlan service station on Lexington Avenue in upper Manhattan. Manager Walter Lyle walked over to the car and filled it with five gallons of ethyl as the man behind the wheel requested. “That’s 98 cents,” the attendant told the driver, who reached into his inside coat pocket and pulled a $10 bill from a white envelope. Lyle grasped the bill with his greasy hands as his eyes noticed something unusual. “You don’t see many of these any more,” he told the driver. The…
  • Thursday 19 September 1661

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys
    Samuel Pepys
    19 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Up early, and my father and I alone into the garden, and there talked about our business, and what to do therein. So after I had talked and advised with my coz Claxton, and then with my uncle by his bedside, we all horsed away to Cambridge, where my father and I, having left my wife at the Beare with my brother, went to Mr. Sedgewicke, the steward of Gravely, and there talked with him, but could get little hopes from anything that he would tell us; but at last I did give him a fee, and then he was free to tell me what I asked, which was something, though not much comfort. From thence to our…
  • California attorney facing suspension for fake photos with celebs

    History in the News
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:39 pm
    A California lawyer is facing license suspension for alleged deceptive advertising by photoshopping herself into cozy pictures with politicians and celebrities on her official website. The California State Bar Court is recommending Svitlana Sangary be suspended from practicing law for six months, after an investigation showed her website featured fake publicity photos of her next to President Barrack Obama, former President Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, George Clooney, Kim Kardashian, Ellen DeGeneres and others.
  • Americans know surprisingly little about their government, survey finds

    Breaking News
    20 Sep 2014 | 7:34 am
    While little more than a third of respondents (36 percent) could name all three branches of the U.S. government, just as many (35 percent) could not name a single one.
  • Dingeman Cats in 1652 to 1653

    Anglo-Dutch Wars
    Jim
    12 Sep 2014 | 9:58 am
    Dingeman Cats served as a captain for the Admiralty of Zeeland in 1652 and 1653. At the beginning of the First Anglo-Dutch War, he commanded a hired ship, the Dolphijn. The Dolphijn was quite small with dimensions of 105ft x 24ft x ? x 5-1/2ft. The Dolphijn was armed with 14-8pdr, 8-4pdr, and 2-3pdr. A report on 6 December 1652 gave the crew as 73 sailors and 25 sailors. That was actually after
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    History in the Headlines

  • The Capture of the Lindbergh Baby Kidnapper, 80 Years Ago

    Christopher Klein
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:59 am
    Shortly before 10 a.m. on September 15, 1934, a dark blue Dodge sedan pulled up to the gasoline pumps at a Warner-Quinlan service station on Lexington Avenue in upper Manhattan. Manager Walter Lyle walked over to the car and filled it with five gallons of ethyl as the man behind the wheel requested. “That’s 98 cents,” the attendant told the driver, who reached into his inside coat pocket and pulled a $10 bill from a white envelope. Lyle grasped the bill with his greasy hands as his eyes noticed something unusual. “You don’t see many of these any more,” he told the driver. The…
  • British Files Reveal Secrets of WWII Spies, Traitors

    Christopher Klein
    18 Sep 2014 | 1:20 pm
    World War II intelligence files released by Britain's National Archives in September, 2014. (Credit: Scott Barbour/Getty Images) On the afternoon of December 7, 1942, a stunning 22-year-old blonde scanned Liverpool’s State Café and spotted her prey. The target matched the brief description given to her—26 years old, black moustache, sallow complexion and large brown eyes. The small moles on the left cheek and the right side of the chin of José Tinchant left no doubt that this was her mark. She approached the British spy-in-training and asked, “Are you by any chance Mr. Tas?” The…
  • The Strange Case of Emperor Norton I of the United States

    Evan Andrews
    17 Sep 2014 | 10:34 am
    Credit: Buyenlarge/Getty Images On September 17, 1859, a most unusual decree appeared in the San Francisco Bulletin newspaper. In grandiloquent fashion, the message stated, “At the peremptory request and desire of a large majority of the citizens…I, Joshua Norton…declare and proclaim myself Emperor of these United States.” It went on to command representatives from all the states to convene in the Bay Area, “to make such alterations in the existing laws of the Union as may ameliorate the evils under which the country is laboring.” The edict was signed, “NORTON I, Emperor of the…
  • The History Behind the Scottish Independence Vote

    Sarah Pruitt
    16 Sep 2014 | 12:58 pm
    George Clark/iStockphotos.com Wars of Independence When King Alexander III died in 1286, Scotland was left without a ruler. His children were all dead, so his three-year-old granddaughter Margaret, known as the “Maid of Norway,” succeeded to the throne. When she fell ill during the sea voyage from Norway to Scotland and died, 13 rival noblemen stepped forward to stake their claim on the throne. To settle the question, the interim government (known as “guardians”) turned to King Edward I of England, who made all the claimants promise to accept him as overlord of Scotland, which they…
  • 9 Things You May Not Know About “The Star-Spangled Banner”

    Christopher Klein
    12 Sep 2014 | 10:46 am
    Francis Scott Key watching the bombardment of Fort McHenry 1. Francis Scott Key intended his verses to be song lyrics, not poetry. “The Star Spangled-Banner” was not a poem set to a melody years later. Although Key was an amateur poet and not a songwriter, when he composed his verses, he intended them to accompany a popular song of the day. “We know he had the tune in mind because the rhyme and meter exactly fit it,” says Marc Leepson, author of the new Key biography “What So Proudly We Hailed.” The first broadside of the verses, printed just days after the battle, noted that the…
 
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    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Thursday 19 September 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    19 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Up early, and my father and I alone into the garden, and there talked about our business, and what to do therein. So after I had talked and advised with my coz Claxton, and then with my uncle by his bedside, we all horsed away to Cambridge, where my father and I, having left my wife at the Beare with my brother, went to Mr. Sedgewicke, the steward of Gravely, and there talked with him, but could get little hopes from anything that he would tell us; but at last I did give him a fee, and then he was free to tell me what I asked, which was something, though not much comfort. From thence to our…
  • Wednesday 18 September 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    18 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    The next morning up early and begun our march; the way about Puckridge very bad, and my wife, in the very last dirty place of all, got a fall, but no hurt, though some dirt. At last she begun, poor wretch, to be tired, and I to be angry at it, but I was to blame; for she is a very good companion as long as she is well. In the afternoon we got to Cambridge, where I left my wife at my cozen Angier’s while I went to Christ’s College, and there found my brother in his chamber, and talked with him; and so to the barber’s, and then to my wife again, and remounted for Impington,…
  • Tuesday 17 September 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    17 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    [Continued from yesterday. P.G.] …And the next morning got up, telling my wife of my journey, and she with a few words got me to hire her a horse to go along with me. So I went to my Lady’s and elsewhere to take leave, and of Mr. Townsend did borrow a very fine side-saddle for my wife; and so after all things were ready, she and I took coach to the end of the town towards Kingsland, and there got upon my horse and she upon her pretty mare that I hired for her, and she rides very well. By the mare at one time falling she got a fall, but no harm; so we got to Ware, and there supped,…
  • Monday 16 September 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    This morning I was busy at home to take in my part of our freight of Coles, which Sir G. Carteret, Sir R. Slingsby, and myself sent for, which is 10 Chaldron, 8 of which I took in, and with the other to repay Sir W. Pen what I borrowed of him a little while ago. So that from this day I should see how long 10 chaldron of coals will serve my house, if it please the Lord to let me live to see them burned. In the afternoon by appointment to meet Dr. Williams and his attorney, and they and I to Tom Trice, and there got him in discourse to confess the words that he had said that his mother did…
  • Sunday 15 September 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    15 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    (Lord’s day). To my aunt Kite’s in the morning to help my uncle Fenner to put things in order against anon for the buriall, and at noon home again; and after dinner to church, my wife and I, and after sermon with my wife to the buriall of my aunt Kite, where besides us and my uncle Fenner’s family, there was none of any quality, but poor rascally people. So we went to church with the corps, and there had service read at the grave, and back again with Pegg Kite who will be, I doubt, a troublesome carrion to us executors; but if she will not be ruled, I shall fling up my…
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    History in the News

  • California attorney facing suspension for fake photos with celebs

    19 Sep 2014 | 8:39 pm
    A California lawyer is facing license suspension for alleged deceptive advertising by photoshopping herself into cozy pictures with politicians and celebrities on her official website. The California State Bar Court is recommending Svitlana Sangary be suspended from practicing law for six months, after an investigation showed her website featured fake publicity photos of her next to President Barrack Obama, former President Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, George Clooney, Kim Kardashian, Ellen DeGeneres and others.
  • 40 Years of Friday: Where are they now?

    19 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Karen's first cousin was Vice President Karen Mayfield says she wasn't surprised by her first cousin Al Gore's efforts to save the environment. 'As a teenager, he had a passion for the earth and the balance of the earth,' she said.
  • Medal of Honor campaign for WWI hero advances

    19 Sep 2014 | 1:08 pm
    The U.S. Senate has passed legislation that would allow the president to consider awarding a posthumous Medal of Honor to Sgt. Henry Johnson, a World War I hero from upstate New York.
  • Stewart Roasts Biden, Bids Emotional Farewell to SNL's Michael Che

    19 Sep 2014 | 10:20 am
    Former President Bill Clinton was the guest on Thursday night's Daily Show , so Jon Stewart decided to do his wife Hillary Clinton a favor and spend the opening segment demonstrating why Vice President Joe Biden "will never be president." "As Joe Biden giveth, Joe Biden taketh away," Stewart said, before playing a clips of the vice president's latest verbal gaffe, including his inopportune use of the term "Shylocks."
  • Why Hillary Clinton won't say she's running in 2016

    19 Sep 2014 | 6:41 am
    CNN Political Contributor and Democratic Strategist Paul Begala speaks with Candy Crowley on CNN's State of the Union Sunday, January 23, 2011. Paul Begala, a Democratic strategist and CNN political contributor, is senior adviser to Priorities USA Action, the biggest super PAC favoring President Barack Obama's re-election.
 
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    Anglo-Dutch Wars

  • Dingeman Cats in 1652 to 1653

    Jim
    12 Sep 2014 | 9:58 am
    Dingeman Cats served as a captain for the Admiralty of Zeeland in 1652 and 1653. At the beginning of the First Anglo-Dutch War, he commanded a hired ship, the Dolphijn. The Dolphijn was quite small with dimensions of 105ft x 24ft x ? x 5-1/2ft. The Dolphijn was armed with 14-8pdr, 8-4pdr, and 2-3pdr. A report on 6 December 1652 gave the crew as 73 sailors and 25 sailors. That was actually after
  • What we know about the Gecroonde Liefde, Marcus Hartman's ship, in 1653

    Jim
    5 Sep 2014 | 5:20 am
    Captain Marcus Hartman commanded the Middelburg Directors' ship Gecroonde Liefde in 1653. Early in the year, Michiel De Ruyter used the ship as his temporary flagship. After that, the Gecroonde Liefde continued to serve in his squadron. The Gecroonde Liefde was one of the ships that was lost in the storm off the Texel on about 9 November 1653. We know the dimensions of the Gecroonde Liefde: 136ft
  • The Zeven Provincien on 3 March 1672

    Jim
    17 May 2014 | 9:18 am
    We have a handwritten list that includes the details for the Zeven Provincien (the Dutch fleet flagship) as of 3 March 1672:Name: Zeven Provincien Admiralty: Admiralty of the Maze or Rotterdam Built: 1665 Length in Amsterdam feet: 163 feet Beam in Amsterdam feet: 43 feet Hold in Amsterdam feet: 16-1/2 feet Deck height in Amsterdam feet: 7-1/2 feet Guns 12-36pdr 16-24pdr 12-18pdr 18-12pdr
  • Book: Dutch Ships in Various Operations in the First Anglo-Dutch War

    Jim
    13 May 2014 | 6:10 am
    I have had this book project, Dutch Ships in Various Operations in the First Anglo-Dutch War, in work for more than a decade. I would like to push to complete this as a Kindle book. I am in the process of doing the necessary reformatting. I have the information needed, although some analysis remains to be done.
  • Dutch warship inventories

    Jim
    11 Dec 2013 | 5:46 am
    There must be a way to exploit the inventories for Dutch warships. The largest number date from around 23 June 1653, after the Battle of the Gabbard. A typical report after a battle in the Seventeenth Century included an inventory for each ship. The inventories from 1638 and 1640 just seem to have been made as part of normal reporting. The best inventories are in great detail and might include a
 
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    American Presidents Blog

  • McKinley Shot!

    M
    11 Sep 2014 | 11:33 am
    The sad news of the McKinley assassination from the the Evening Star (Washington D.C.) on September 6, 1901.
  • John Quincy Adams, Executive Order of July 11, 1826

    M
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:43 am
    Most are aware that Thomas Jefferson and John Adams died on the same day (July 4th) in 1826. Needless to say, this coincidence on Independence Day got a lot of attention at the time. There were public honors from the military for both men.John Quincy Adams Administration issued an Executive Order on July 11, 1826 to elaborate on this.It noted, "A coincidence of circumstances so wonderful gives confidence to the belief that the patriotic efforts of these illustrious men were Heaven directed, and furnishes a new seal to the hope that the prosperity of these States is under the special…
  • Lincoln's Tomb in Springfield, IL

    M
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:12 pm
    I had the privilege of visiting Springfield, IL last week. I was able to stop by Lincoln's Tomb. It is a beautiful structure. Abraham Lincoln, his wife, and two of his sons are buried here. Thought I would share a picture of the tombstone.
  • US Presidents: Lists and Records

    M
    30 Jul 2014 | 12:34 pm
    I found an interesting Presidential website titled US Presidents: Lists and Records. The site describes itself as, "The presidents of the United States are so much fun. Understanding them helps us understand American history. We have compiled a series of lists about the presidents, and will be adding more as we think of new categories." Included are very useful items such as the 1995 historical ranking of 41 presidents conducted from Siena College, which Presidents were left-handed, the relative share of popular and Electoral College vote each president won, and regular and pocket vetoes…
  • John Adams on Sally Hemings Debate

    Jennie W
    23 Jun 2014 | 12:07 pm
    I’ve never paid that much attention to the Jefferson-Hemings debate.  I’m perfectly okay believing either side of the coin, honestly leaning more towards, yes, he did father those kids. The ins and outs of the relationship also haven’t greatly interested me either, as Jefferson was always clearly a slave owner and this is a typical issue of slave owners, one of the many reasons why slavery was a terrible institution.    I’m currently reading Passionate Sage by Joseph Ellis(incidentally the article I referenced above was written by Ellis as well….although I…
 
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    History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

  • September 20, 1973: King triumphs in Battle of Sexes

    19 Sep 2014 | 9:00 pm
    On this day in 1973, in a highly publicized "Battle of the Sexes" tennis match, top women's player Billie Jean King, 29, beats Bobby Riggs, 55, a former No. 1 ranked men's player. Riggs (1918-1995), a self-proclaimed male chauvinist, had boasted that women were inferior, that they couldn't handle the pressure of the game and that even at his age he could beat any female player. The match was a huge media event, witnessed in person by over 30,000 spectators at the Houston Astrodome and by another 50 million TV viewers worldwide. King made a Cleopatra-style entrance on a gold litter carried by…
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    The New York History Blog

  • This Week’s New York History Web Highlights

    Editorial Staff
    19 Sep 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Civil War: The Union’s Fake Canadians Historic Bars: The Monkey Bar in New York To the Left: The Nation Online Archive Manhattan: The Truth Behind the TV Show Theodorus Bailey: Chateaugay’s Civil War Hero Suffrage: 10 Facts About Alice Paul Report: Black Students Graduate With More Debt Hoffman’s Playland: The End of an Era Sam […]
  • The Historians: The Renaissance and Gold Star Mothers

    Bob Cudmore
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:23 am
    This week on The Historians, popular historian Thomas Cahill discusses his latest book, “Heretics and Heroes: How Renaissance Artists and Reformation Priests Created our World”. In the second half of the show I talk with novelist April Smith about “A Star for Mrs. Blake”.  The novel is based on a federal program in the early […]
  • In Change of Course, Finger Lakes Museum Relocates

    Editorial Staff
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    In an unexpected change in direction, the Finger Lakes Museum’s board of trustees voted to move the project from its proposed location in Keuka Lake State Park to the site of its Discovery Campus in Branchport. The resolution was unanimously adopted at a special board meeting on August 12th. According to a statement issued to […]
  • This Week’s Top New York History News

    Editorial Staff
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    NYS Ignores 350th Birthday Hispanic Heritage Month Underway Lake George’s Mystery Munitions Cornell Student Suicide Suit Settled John Waters To Speak at MAPACA NYS Museum Opens Sept 11 Exhibit NY Gets Wilderness Act Cabin Easement Battle of Fort Anne Site Sought Rogers Island Land Being Purchased Plattsburgh Concludes 1812 Bicentennial Subscribe! More than 7,500 people […]
  • A First Lady’s Failed Adirondack Cure

    David Fiske
    18 Sep 2014 | 12:00 pm
    In the summer of 1892, the wife of President Benjamin Harrison, Caroline Scott Harrison, became extremely ill. She primarily suffered from tuberculosis, but experienced complications from pleurisy and the accumulation of fluid in her chest. Medical treatment of T. B. at the time mainly amounted to having the patient rest. For this reason, it was […]
 
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    O Say Can You See?

  • Remembering the War of 1812

    NMAH
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:22 am
    Guest blog post by Sir Peter Westmacott, the British ambassador to the United States Fort McHenry is hallowed ground in United States history. It is of course best known as the scene of a siege during the War of 1812, a siege witnessed by a Washington lawyer called Francis Scott Key, whose eloquent impressions later became known as the 'Star Spangled Banner.' (It's perhaps less well known that, when he first wrote those famous lines, Key was on a mercy mission to the opposing fleet, and actually witnessed the bombardment from behind the British lines.) Fireworks explode over the Royal…
  • Still dreaming of you: Selena's outfit at the Smithsonian

    NMAH
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Iconic cultural objects have the power to preserve beloved chapters of history long after they come to a close. As we approach the 20th anniversary of Selena Quintanilla-Perez's death, intern Christine Miranda contemplates the significance of the Tejana singer's leather outfit, which is in the museum's collection. I have a lot of fond memories of Selena. Sure, I was only two when she passed away in 1995, but music is a powerful historian. The black boombox in my grandparents' kitchen used to constantly play her compilation album Ones, and I recall dancing to her greatest…
  • Live blog: Experts answer your #AskACurator questions

    NMAH
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:32 am
    By Education Specialist Erin Blasco Today, many of our staff are participated in a global, Twitter-based Q&A called Ask a Curator Day. Here are a few of our favorite questions and answers.  .@amhistorymuseum My 2nd graders want to know what is the smallest item you have #AskACurator — Melinee Fernandez (@mellie1245) September 17, 2014 Greg Kenyon, Collections on the Web Contractor, Division of Work and Industry: This integrated circuit was collected because it is an example of "chip art"—microscopic doodling on an integrated circuit. Sometimes done to…
  • Our experts answer your #AskACurator questions

    NMAH
    16 Sep 2014 | 3:34 pm
    By Education Specialist Erin Blasco It's morning in New Zealand, meaning the global, Twitter-based Q&A called Ask a Curator Day has already started. We'll begin answering questions at 10 AM EDT on Wednesday, September 17. Here's who's on deck to answer you questions. 10-11 AM EDT: Banjos, buttons, country music photography, and 50 years of museum history Greg Kenyon, Collections on the Web Contractor, Division of Work and Industry: Greg is part of the team working to put objects online;…
  • My Smithsonian internship, my American identity

    NMAH
    16 Sep 2014 | 1:28 pm
    Vanessa Chicas, an intern in the museum's Program in Latino History and Culture, reflects on the unique experience she had as a Smithsonian intern, just in time for Citizenship Day on September 17. Words cannot explain how happy I was when I found out that I had been given the incredible opportunity to join the Smithsonian as an intern for the Program in Latino History and Culture. I learned new things about Braceros, Latin food, and music. But I never expected that it would help establish a deeper connection to my identity as an American. This summer, I helped commemorate the song that…
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    Toptenz.net

  • 10 Household Products That are Almost Indestructible

    Karl Smallwood
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:10 pm
    The modern world revolves around the idea of disposable technology, the idea that we need to constantly upgrade and replace the things we own with something bigger and better that can also sync with our fridge. So we wanted to take a few minutes to talk about 10 items you could find in an average […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Household Products That are Almost Indestructible appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Top 10 Fatal Food Fiascos

    Aimee M.
    18 Sep 2014 | 9:10 pm
    There is something about food that causes some people to do some pretty bizarre things. Look no further than the big Fourth of July hot-dog-eating contest for evidence of this. That’s a fairly benign example. Below, meet ten people (and animals) who seem to have completely lost their heads when it comes to various items […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post Top 10 Fatal Food Fiascos appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • The Poster For “The Thing” Was Painted In One Day

    Karl Smallwood
    18 Sep 2014 | 3:54 pm
    The poster for The Thing is regarded by movie buffs, horror fans and parka aficionados as one of the most striking and visually The post The Poster For “The Thing” Was Painted In One Day appeared first on Fact Fiend.   Source: Toptenz.net The post The Poster For “The Thing” Was Painted In One Day appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Undeserved Razzie Winners

    Nathanael Hood
    17 Sep 2014 | 9:10 pm
    The Golden Raspberry Awards, more affectionately referred to as the Razzies, is an annual award ceremony that celebrates the very worst of American film-making. Held one day before the Academy Awards, the Razzies have established themselves as part of the American pop culture landscape. But, as with any award, disputes have broken out over the […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Undeserved Razzie Winners appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • September 18, 2014: A New King for Scotland?

    Beth Michaels
    17 Sep 2014 | 9:01 pm
    A Brief History Today, on September 18, 2014, Scotland is voting either yes or no on the topic of independence from Great Britain and the United Kingdom.  Only a simple majority vote is needed, that means 50% + one person. Digging Deeper Formally united in 1707 by the Act of Union which was ratified by bothContinue reading... The post September 18, 2014: A New King for Scotland? appeared first on Cracked History.   Source: Toptenz.net The post September 18, 2014: A New King for Scotland? appeared first on Toptenz.net.
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    History Of Macedonia

  • Συνέντευξη του Μανόλη Ανδρόνικου στον Τέρενς Κουίκ (1977)

    Stern
    20 Sep 2014 | 6:08 am
      Συνέντευξη του αρχαιολόγου ΜΑΝΟΛΗ ΑΝΔΡΟΝΙΚΟΥ στον δημοσιογράφο ΤΕΡΕΝΣ ΚΟΥΙΚ, κατά την οποία εκφράζει την βεβαιότητά του ότι ο βασιλικός τάφος που ανακαλύφθηκε το Νοέμβριο του 1977 στη Μεγάλη Τούμπα της Βεργίνας είναι του ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ Β’, ενώ παράλληλα αναφέρεται συνοπτικά στις συγκεκριμένες ανασκαφές και τα σημαντικά…
  • Letter from World Pan-Macedonian Associations to L. Coffey

    Stern
    19 Sep 2014 | 11:14 am
    World Pan-Macedonian Associations Communication: Nina Gatzoulis Coordinator of the Committee of World Pan-Macedonian Associations Email: ninagatz@comcast.net September 16, 2014 Luke Coffey Margaret Thatcher Fellow The Margaret Thatcher Center for Freedom The Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy The Heritage Foundation 214 Massachusetts Ave NE Washington DC 20002-4999 Dear Mr. Coffey, We, the worldwide PanMacedonian Associations and representatives of […] Related posts: Letter from World Pan-Macedonian Associations to the German Chancellor Angela Merkel Letter from…
  • Επιστολή Παμμακεδονικών Ενώσεων Υφηλίου προς L. Coffey

    Stern
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:19 pm
      WORLD PAN-MACEDONIAN ASSOCIATIONS   Επικοινωνία: Νίνα Γκατζούλη Συντονίστρια Επιτροπής Παμμακεδονικών Ενώσεων Υφηλίου Email: ninagatz@comcast.net Τηλ: 603-742-0466 Φαξ: 603- 617-2977 16 Σεπτεμβρίου 2014 Luke Coffey Margaret Thatcher Fellow The Margaret Thatcher Center for Freedom The Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy The Heritage Foundation 214 Massachusetts Ave NE Washington DC 20002-4999   Αγαπητέ κ. Coffey, Εμείς, οι περίπου […]…
  • Κ. Περιστέρη: Το μνημείο στην Αμφίπολη είναι του τελευταίου τετάρτου του 4ου αιώνα π.Χ.

    Stern
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:47 am
    Την πεποίθηση ότι το ανασκαφικό έργο στον τύμβο Καστά, στην Αρχαία Αμφίπολη, αφορά μνημείο του τελευταίου τετάρτου του 4ου αιώνα π.Χ., εξέφρασε η προϊσταμένη της ΚΗ’ Εφορείας Προϊστορικών και Κλασικών Αρχαιοτήτων Κατερίνα Περιστέρη, μιλώντας σήμερα σε δημοσιογράφους. “Πιστεύω ότι αυτό το μνημείο είναι ακράδαντα του…
  • Δίον : Διεθνής Μαθητική Συνάντηση Αρχαίου Θεάτρου

    Stern
    18 Sep 2014 | 2:07 am
      Στις πλαγιές του Ολύμπου και στο Αρχαίο Θέατρο του Δίου διοργανώνεται από τη Διεύθυνση Δευτεροβάθμιας Εκπαίδευσης Πιερίας – Γραφείο Σχολικών Δραστηριοτήτων η Διεθνής Μαθητική Συνάντηση Αρχαίου Θεάτρου, η οποία έχει τεθεί υπό την Αιγίδα του Υπουργείου Παιδείας (αρ.πρωτ. 42729/Γ7/29-03-2013) και της Ελληνικής Εθνικής Επιτροπής…
 
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    Claire Gebben

  • Flashback: the February 15 Book Launch

    clairegebben
    17 Sep 2014 | 1:17 pm
    My nephew Nicholas Gebben has made a wonderful Book Launch Highlights video from my novel release party back in February. (Click on the book launch highlights link to view it in Youtube.) Thanks Nick! In addition, below are more photos of wonderful friends and family on that day. I smile just to see you all smiling. Thanks to every one for make the launch of The Last of the Blacksmiths such a memorable day!!! The post Flashback: the February 15 Book Launch appeared first on Claire Gebben.
  • Cleveland and the automobile

    clairegebben
    11 Sep 2014 | 11:49 am
    I have a copy of the compendious Jubilee Edition of the Cleveland Wächter und Anzeiger 1902 — a 50th anniversary edition of items published in the Cleveland German newspaper of that name. Since the Jubilee edition was written in German, it languished in relative obscurity for almost 100 years, until an English translation appeared in the year 2000, a publication of Cleveland’s Western Reserve Historical Society. I am forever indebted to WRHS for this translation. I turned to it countless times during my research for The Last of the Blacksmiths. Chock full of information about…
  • How about that Cyndi

    clairegebben
    18 Aug 2014 | 3:21 pm
    The first time I attended a genealogy class taught by Sarah Little I heard about Cyndi’s list. On Sarah’s handout, my teacher noted the site is the most comprehensive reference on the web for genealogy, “the best of them all. A phenomenal encyclopedic site.” Amazingly, Cyndi has now kept Cyndislist.com continuously updated for 18 years. It has a categorized index to over 327,000 online genealogy resources. I’ve used Cyndislist.com to find immigrant ship passenger lists, links to German genealogy sites, Palatine genealogy sites, and genealogy resources by state.
  • A new day in history

    clairegebben
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:15 pm
    Once upon a time, before I really started researching 19th century history, I lumped the entire 19th century into the Victorian era, all about propriety and manners, dominated by “prudish, hypocritical, stuffy, [and] narrow-minded” cultural attitudes (Murfin and Ray 496). While two-thirds of the 19th century did fall within Queen Victoria’s reign in England (1837-1901), I now know the Victorian America preoccupation involved mainly New England and the Deep South. Most American citizens weren’t about establishing high society. They were on the move, focused on…
  • Civil War POWs

    clairegebben
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:59 am
    In the current July/August “Echoes,” published by the Ohio Historical Society, I was delighted to find a piece about the Union Army POW camp Johnson’s Island (located in Sandusky Bay just to the south of Lake Erie). I don’t remember how I happened on the existence of the Johnson’s Island camp in my research for The Last of the Blacksmiths, but I remember thinking how spotty the information seemed. Now, the “Echoes” magazine notes, there’s a new exhibit called “Privy to History” about the Johnson’s Island Civil War Prison at…
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    Ancient Origins

  • Archaeologists reveal astounding Bronze Age microscopic gold work from around Stonehenge

    aprilholloway
    20 Sep 2014 | 6:26 am
    Archaeologists have revealed the process utilized by highly-skilled craftsmen to create the magnificent gold artifacts that were found around Stonehenge.  According to Discovery News, the gold work involved such tiny components that optical experts believe they could only have been made by children or adults with extreme short-sightedness, and would have caused lasting damage to their eyesight. In 1808, William Cunnington, one of Britain's earliest professional archaeologists, discovered what has become known as the crown jewels of the 'King of Stonehenge'. They were found within a large…
  • Tiny pharaoh-branded amulet may prove fabled military campaign of Sheshonq I

    aprilholloway
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:35 pm
    An archaeological student has discovered a tiny Egyptian scarab in an ancient copper mine in southern Jordan, which carries the name of Sheshonq I, powerful pharaoh of Egypt’s 22nd Dynasty, according to a report in Live Science. The artifact may provide evidence for Sheshonq I's legendary military campaign in the mineral-rich region nearly 3,000 years ago. The small scarab amulet was found in the Bronze Age smelting slags at Khirbat Hamra Ifdan in the Faynan district of Jordan, about 50 kilometres south of the Dead Sea, which was first discovered in 2002. The region is one of three main…
  • The Curious Phaistos Disc – Ancient Mystery or Clever Hoax?

    lizleafloor
    19 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    In 1908 an Italian archaeologist ventured into the ruins of Phaistos, an ancient Minoan palace on the south coast of Crete. In an underground temple depository, among burnt bones, dust, and ashes, he found a remarkably intact golden-hued disc. The discovery is known as one of the most famous mysteries in archaeology: The Phaistos Disc. The Phaistos (or Phaestos) Disc is a large, umber-coloured, fired clay plate, about 15 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick. Both sides of the disc are covered with a spiral of strange stamped symbols, circling clockwise towards the disc’s centre. It’s presumed…
  • The Mystery of the San Pedro Mountains Mummy

    mrreese
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:02 am
    In June 1934, two gold prospectors, who had been digging and blasting for gold within the San Pedro Mountains in Wyoming, came across a small cavern buried deep within the thick rock. When the dust began to settle, the prospectors made a startling discovery – the well-preserved, but long-forgotten, remains of a tiny human. The origins of this little human were a mystery. Local Native American tribes were known to tell stories of legendary “tiny people,” “little spirits”, or the Nimeriga. In some of these stories, the small people had magical powers, or healing powers. In other…
  • New study reveals third group of ancient ancestors of modern Europeans

    aprilholloway
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:04 pm
    It has long been thought that modern Europeans descended from both indigenous hunters and Middle Eastern farmers. However, a new study published in the journal Nature, shows that a third population came into the mix – Northern Eurasians. The research shows that interbreeding between the three groups within the last 7,000 years, accounts for the majority of the genetic landscape seen in Europe today.  According to a report in the BBC, the study shifts scientists’ ideas of how groups of people migrated across the globe thousands of years ago. “Prior to this paper, the models we had for…
 
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    Rogues Gallery

  • Hey Hey We’re The Mohocks!

    The Rake Yesterday
    11 Sep 2014 | 2:39 pm
    LONDON 1712 I don’t know what the youth of this country are coming to, I really don’t. The respectable classes can no longer set foot outside their homes after dusk without fear of molestation – and worse – from gangs of lustful, drink addled cutthroats whom Satan himself would spurn. Or so the pamphleteers say. They call themselves “Mohocks” – after a cannibal tribe in India – and all genteel London trembles with terror at news of their outrages. “Read all about it”   I have fallen into a swoon myself several times since Monday. It’s all in the pages of…
  • The Regency Keith Moon – Drunken Horseplay with “Mad” Jack Mytton

    The Rake Yesterday
    25 Jun 2014 | 6:24 am
    Calais 1832 What kind of maniac tries to cure an attack of the hiccups by setting himself on fire? The answer is lying in a pain and brandy induced swoon with half his body the colour of “ a newly singed bacon-hog.” As he deliriously points out however, his hiccups have disappeared.   John Mytton’s remedies for life’s little inconveniences are nothing if not suicidally excessive. Which is probably why even his closet friends refer to him as “Mad” Jack. The poor fellow’s only 37 but he looks one hundred years older. A lifetime of biblical boozing, unfettered extravagance…
  • François l’Olonnais, Cannibal, Psychopath and Extreme Optician.

    The Rake Yesterday
    4 Mar 2014 | 12:36 pm
    Tortuga 1668 I’m a buccaneer ,Tortuga port-scum. I’ll fuck your horse, skin your grandmother and sell your babies into slavery for the price of a drink. Even I thought twice before signing on with him. I’m a bad man, no argument, but he was EVIL, an insane bloodthirsty maniac. Why,I’ve seen him bind a rope around a man’s forehead and slowly tighten it until his eyes popped out of his face…..and that was a kindness! When all’s said though, he was fair to his crew, loved the Lord and made us a fucking fortune in loot. So raise your black jacks lads and drink to the most…
  • Hey Nonny! it’s the love Doctor.

    The Rake Yesterday
    14 Jan 2014 | 11:55 am
    London 1595 Queen Elizabeth and the handsome doctor walk side by side through winding “lanes and closes”.The doctor’s long, fur-lined gown bespeaks his learning and status, the queen’s flimsy white shift and petticoat shows she has just got out of bed. The couple pass a raucous group of laughing men from whom emerges a tall fellow with a red beard. The doctor recognises him as an impertinent weaver and is outraged when he not only addresses the elderly queen in coarse and familiar tones but then plants a kiss upon her virgin lips. Taking her majesty by the arm, the gallant…
  • The Exhausting Naval Adventures of Augustus Hervey.

    The Rake Yesterday
    10 Dec 2013 | 5:12 am
    Genoa 1755 Captain Augustus Hervey is in a darkened room hiding under a married ladies bedclothes. The lady in question is lying in the bed next to him. She is tantalisingly near but the young naval officer cannot allow his eager fingers to explore because her husband (who is unaware of the lecherous presence beneath his marital sheets) is approaching the foot of the bed with a lighted candle, asking if he can come closer in order to show off some Indian handkerchiefs. There is no acceptable nautical phrase for this particular situation. Hervey himself is not the handsomest of fellows but is…
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    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • The Complete Cities of Ancient Egypt

    18 Sep 2014 | 11:37 am
    The Complete Cities of Ancient Egypt, by Dr. Steven Snape, instructor of Egyptian Archaeology at the University of Liverpool, reveals the astonishing urban world of ancient Egyptian civilizations, from large cities like Memphis, Thebes, and Alexandria, to lost centers like the enigmatic Amarna of the pharaoh Akhenaten. The Complete Cities of Ancient Egypt additionally summarizes the latest urban discoveries...
  • Zenobia's Rebellion in the Historia Augusta

    18 Sep 2014 | 10:50 am
    The Historia Augusta (Great History) is a Latin work of the 4th century CE that chronicles the lives of Roman emperors from 117-285 CE. While today the work is recognized as largely fictional (some scholars even giving it the label of "historical fiction"), it was considered reliable history in its time and for many centuries afterwards. The famous historian Edward Gibbon (1737-1794 CE) accepted...
  • Roman Roads

    17 Sep 2014 | 6:51 am
    The long straight roads built by the Romans wherever they conquered have, in many cases, become just as famous names in history as their greatest emperors and generals. Building upon more ancient routes and creating a huge number of new ones, Roman engineers were audacious in their plans to join one point to another in as straight a line as possible whatever the difficulties in geography and the costs...
  • Sammu-Ramat and Semiramis: The Inspiration and the Myth

    16 Sep 2014 | 8:21 am
    Sammu-Ramat (reigned 811-806 BCE) was the queen regent of the Assyrian Empire who held the throne for her young son Adad Nirari III until he reached maturity. She is also known as Shammuramat, Sammuramat, and, most notably, as Semiramis. This last designation, "Semiramis", has been the source of considerable controversy for over a century now, as scholars and historians argue over whether Sammu-Ramat...
  • Seja Majeed - The Forgotten Tale of Larsa

    15 Sep 2014 | 6:21 am
    Born in Algeria to Iraqi refugees, Ms. Seja Majeed grew up in the United Kingdom, where her family claimed asylum. Impassioned by history, archaeology, and especially Iraqi culture, Seja yearned to be a writer. In her dbut novel for young adults, The Forgotten Tale of Larsa, Seja explores the themes of love, loss, change, and exile in an ancient Near Eastern setting. In this conversation with James...
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    AncientHistoryLists » AncientHistoryLists

  • 10 oldest Ancient civilizations ever existed

    Saugat Adhikari
    10 Sep 2014 | 7:08 pm
    In the course of human evolution, at a certain point in time, the idea of living in a group with mutual understanding and dependency became a very useful and practical lifestyle. From such small isolated groups, communities were formed. Then came the societies which in due time became a civilization. How the human mentality and psychology led to this huge change is still a popular topic among the historians and anthropologist, and a major discussion for another day. For now, let’s talk about some of the oldest civilizations to have ever existed in the world. We are talking about the…
  • Top 10 facts about Hannibal Barca

    Saugat Adhikari
    31 Aug 2014 | 9:15 pm
    Hannibal was born in 247 B.C in North Africa. He was one of the greatest military general of the ancient world, who lead the Carthaginian army. He was widely known for his strategy of out taking and surrounding the enemy with a combined forced of infantry and cavalry. Rome and Carthaginian were enemy before the Hannibal. The first conflict between the roman and Carthage result the first Punic war in Sicily. It lasted for over 20 years, where Carthaginian surrendered Rome. The conflict is mainly for the trade control of Mediterranean. Hamilcar Barca was about to carry his troops to the…
  • Top 10 famous clothes in ancient Greece

    Saugat Adhikari
    27 Aug 2014 | 10:19 pm
    Through the different civilizations that existed in the human history, each age and era had certain social aspects that made them stand apart from each other. One of such aspects, and a far important one, is the popular clothes and dress of the people used to wear in each respective culture that lived within those civilizations. And when it comes to the famous clothes in ancient Greece, there were quite a few dresses that were not only popular back in the ancient times, but also have had an impact in the subsequent cultures that branched out from the ancient Greek civilization. People in…
  • Top 10 most popular ancient Egyptian food

    Saugat Adhikari
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:02 pm
    The ancient world of Egypt was known for it’s prodigious culture, the ever standing pyramids and the sphinx, the Pharaohs and the once a majestic civilization that resided by the banks of the river Nile. And when it comes to the what culinary habits of the people in ancient Egypt, it is doubtless that they ate much better than people in any other ancient civilization of the world, even more so if the same timeline is considered for comparison. Much of the information about what the ancient Egyptians ate and drank comes from pictures on tomb walls, offering trays and foods left in the tombs,…
  • Top 10 most worshipped Ancient Egyptian Gods

    Saugat Adhikari
    10 Aug 2014 | 11:28 pm
    Civilization in Egypt holds many facts which are hidden within themselves and are never revealed. The great land along the banks of Nile has been extraordinarily mentioned in the modern as well as the ancient history. Around 3100BC, after the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt, Pharaoh was the supreme for the rituals which were carried out. Egyptian deities were worshipped by the people and were considered as the form of nature that they should not make angry. So what were these natural forms which the population of ancient Egypt used to worship and offer their prayers. Lets’…
 
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