History

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  • New Research Drills Into History of Cavities

    History in the Headlines
    Sarah Pruitt
    23 Jul 2014 | 2:29 pm
    The first study focused on the bacterium that causes toothaches, known as Streptococcus mutans. This bacterium, which lives naturally in the mouth, metabolizes the sugars from food and excretes lactic acid, which wears away at the enamel covering the teeth. This process causes tooth decay and dental caries (Latin for “rot”), better known as cavities. In the new study, scientists analyzed S. mutans DNA extracted from teeth dating back to the Bronze Age. They found that the bacterium has been mutating rapidly throughout the course of human history, and becoming more diverse as the human…
  • Tuesday 23 July 1661

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys
    Samuel Pepys
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Put on my mourning. Made visits to Sir W. Pen and Batten. Then to Westminster, and at the Hall staid talking with Mrs. Michell a good while, and in the afternoon, finding myself unfit for business, I went to the Theatre, and saw “Brenoralt,” I never saw before. It seemed a good play, but ill acted; only I sat before Mrs. Palmer, the King’s mistress, and filled my eyes with her, which much pleased me. Then to my father’s, where by my desire I met my uncle Thomas, and discoursed of my uncle’s will to him, and did satisfy [him] as well as I could. So to my uncle…
  • Bill Clinton says AIDS-free generation a within reacha

    History in the News
    24 Jul 2014 | 8:35 am
    An AIDS-free generation is within reach if early treatment is provided to people infected with HIV and help scaled up for women and children, former U.S. president Bill Clinton said on Wednesday.
  • Clinton seen as the most intelligent president, George W. Bush the least

    Breaking News
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:21 am
    Americans are especially likely to think of Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan as "very" smart.
  • Battle of Ecnomus Part 1

    History According to Bob
    Bob Packett
    23 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    This show is part 1 of 3 on the great naval battle of Ecnomus in the 1st Punic War.
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    History in the Headlines

  • New Research Drills Into History of Cavities

    Sarah Pruitt
    23 Jul 2014 | 2:29 pm
    The first study focused on the bacterium that causes toothaches, known as Streptococcus mutans. This bacterium, which lives naturally in the mouth, metabolizes the sugars from food and excretes lactic acid, which wears away at the enamel covering the teeth. This process causes tooth decay and dental caries (Latin for “rot”), better known as cavities. In the new study, scientists analyzed S. mutans DNA extracted from teeth dating back to the Bronze Age. They found that the bacterium has been mutating rapidly throughout the course of human history, and becoming more diverse as the human…
  • World’s First Automotive Competition Held, 120 Years Ago

    Evan Andrews
    22 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    August 6, 1894 cover of Le Petit Journal dedicated to the "Competition for Horseless Carriages" In the 1890s, cars were still a relatively untested technology. Various steam-powered contraptions had been chugging along the roadways since the late-18th century, but more lightweight, driver-friendly vehicles had only arrived on the scene as recently as 1886, when German inventors Karl Friedrich Benz and Gottlieb Daimler developed gasoline-powered autos with internal combustion engines. Cars were considered the playthings of the super-rich, and the notion of racing them was almost…
  • Uncovering the Mysteries of the Bog Bodies

    Sarah Pruitt
    21 Jul 2014 | 1:25 pm
    Body of Huldremose Woman In Denmark alone, more than 500 bodies and skeletons were buried in the peat bogs between 800 B.C. and A.D. 200. Thanks to lack of oxygen and the anti-microbial properties of peat moss, their mummified corpses have been extraordinarily well preserved, including discernible facial features, fingerprints, hair, nails and other traits. As Iron Age Europeans left no written records about their customs or their religious rituals, researchers can only speculate as to why the bodies were buried in the bogs instead of cremated, which was the general practice at the time.
  • 10 Things You May Not Know About Samuel Colt

    Christopher Klein
    18 Jul 2014 | 8:21 am
    1. Colt was an early adopter of assembly-line production. More than a half-century before Henry Ford used assembly lines in his automobile factories, Colt employed them to produce his revolvers in his enormous Hartford armory beginning in the 1850s. Using interchangeable parts, Colt’s armory could turn out 150 weapons per day by 1856. The mass production allowed Colt to make his weapons more affordable to gun-buyers settling the West. 2. He pioneered product placement. Colt was a masterful marketer and self-promoter who relied on more than just advertisements. He personally commissioned…
  • Port Chicago Disaster Stuns the Nation, 70 Years Ago

    Evan Andrews
    17 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Port Chicago Naval Magazine National Memorial The Naval magazine at Port Chicago—a sleepy town some 30 miles north of San Francisco—was first constructed in 1942, after a base at nearby Mare Island was unable to keep up with the demand for munitions for the war effort. From the port’s main pier, sailors toiled day and night transferring bullets, depth charges, artillery shells and mammoth 1,000 and 2,000-pound bombs from train cars into the holds of waiting ships. Hauling the ordnance was grueling, dull and dangerous work. Like so much of the military’s menial labor in the segregated…
 
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    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Tuesday 23 July 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Put on my mourning. Made visits to Sir W. Pen and Batten. Then to Westminster, and at the Hall staid talking with Mrs. Michell a good while, and in the afternoon, finding myself unfit for business, I went to the Theatre, and saw “Brenoralt,” I never saw before. It seemed a good play, but ill acted; only I sat before Mrs. Palmer, the King’s mistress, and filled my eyes with her, which much pleased me. Then to my father’s, where by my desire I met my uncle Thomas, and discoursed of my uncle’s will to him, and did satisfy [him] as well as I could. So to my uncle…
  • Monday 22 July 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    22 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Up by three, and going by four on my way to London; but the day proves very cold, so that having put on no stockings but thread ones under my boots, I was fain at Bigglesworth to buy a pair of coarse woollen ones, and put them on. So by degrees till I come to Hatfield before twelve o’clock, where I had a very good dinner with my hostess, at my Lord of Salisbury’s Inn, and after dinner though weary I walked all alone to the Vineyard, which is now a very beautiful place again; and coming back I met with Mr. Looker, my Lord’s gardener (a friend of Mr. Eglin’s), who showed…
  • Sunday 21 July 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    (Lord’s day). At home all the morning, putting my papers in order against my going to-morrow and doing many things else to that end. Had a good dinner, and Stankes and his wife with us. To my business again in the afternoon, and in the evening came the two Trices, Mr. Greene, and Mr. Philips, and so we began to argue. At last it came to some agreement that for our giving of my aunt 10l. she is to quit the house, and for other matters they are to be left to the law, which do please us all, and so we broke up, pretty well satisfyed. Then came Mr. Barnwell and J. Bowles and supped with us,…
  • Saturday 20 July 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    20 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Up to Huntingdon this morning to Sir Robert Bernard, with whom I met Jaspar Trice. So Sir Robert caused us to sit down together and began discourse very fairly between us, so I drew out the Will and show it him, and [he] spoke between us as well as I could desire, but could come to no issue till Tom Trice comes. Then Sir Robert and I fell to talk about the money due to us upon surrender from Piggott, 164l., which he tells me will go with debts to the heir at law, which breaks my heart on the other side. Here I staid and dined with Sir Robert Bernard and his lady, my Lady Digby, a very good…
  • 16, 17, 18, 19 July 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    19 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    These four days we spent in putting things in order, letting of the crop upon the ground, agreeing with Stankes to have a care of our business in our absence, and we think ourselves in nothing happy but in lighting upon him to be our bayly; in riding to Offord and Sturtlow, and up and down all our lands, and in the evening walking, my father and I about the fields talking, and had advice from Mr. Moore from London, by my desire, that the three witnesses of the will being all legatees, will not do the will any wrong. To-night Serjeant Bernard, I hear, is come home into the country. To supper…
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    History in the News

  • Bill Clinton says AIDS-free generation a within reacha

    24 Jul 2014 | 8:35 am
    An AIDS-free generation is within reach if early treatment is provided to people infected with HIV and help scaled up for women and children, former U.S. president Bill Clinton said on Wednesday.
  • Newt Gingrich slams Bush family's friendliness with Clintons

    24 Jul 2014 | 4:20 am
    Newt Gingrich has blasted the Bushes for being too nice and getting chummy with the Clintons, blaming the family's friendliness for Hillary Clinton's likely presidency.
  • Emanuel's Mayoral Fortunes Rapidly Declining in Chicago

    24 Jul 2014 | 12:10 am
    Even before the gun violence this weekend that took the lives of at least 4 people in a reported 40 shooting incidents, Mayor Rahm Emanuel was in political hot water.
  • WWI Experiences of Two Tennessee Brothers in New TSLA Collection

    23 Jul 2014 | 8:01 pm
    As we approach the 100th anniversary of the United States' involvement in World War I, the Tennessee State Library and Archives' newest online collection, the Puryear Family Photograph Albums, tells the story of two brothers from Gallatin who served in the Army Air Service during and after World War I. Comprised of three photograph albums and ... (more)
  • Atlanta Cyclorama painting to move across town

    23 Jul 2014 | 3:51 pm
    Mayor Kasim Reed announced the move Wednesday as the city commemorates the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Atlanta during the American Civil War, which is the subject of the giant oil painting.
 
 
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    History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

  • July 24, 1911: Machu Picchu discovered

    23 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    On July 24, 1911, American archeologist Hiram Bingham gets his first look at Machu Picchu, an ancient Inca settlement in Peru that is now one of the world's top tourist destinations. Tucked away in the rocky countryside northwest of Cuzco, Machu Picchu is believed to have been a summer retreat for Inca leaders, whose civilization was virtually wiped out by Spanish invaders in the 16th century. For hundreds of years afterwards, its existence was a secret known only to the peasants living in the region. That all changed in the summer of 1911, when Bingham arrived with a small team of explorers…
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    The New York History Blog

  • Paul Bray: Troy’s Union History Is Coming Alive

    Paul M. Bray
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    The nation’s first bona-fide all-female union was formed in Troy 150 years ago under the leadership of a young Irish immigrant, Kate Mullany, and her colleague, Esther Keegan, in reaction to low wages, 12- to 14-hour workdays and unsafe conditions in the collar factories. Local writer and director Ruth Harvey dramatizes the story in a […]
  • Lecture: Lincoln’s Secret Visit to West Point

    Editorial Staff
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:21 am
    President Abraham Lincoln made a clandestine trip to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in June 1862, during the Civil War. It was his longest journey away from the White House and his only trip to New York State during his Presidency. Based upon new and original research, Anthony J. Czarnecki, past president of […]
  • Search On For Plane Missing In Champlain Since 1971

    Editorial Staff
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:00 pm
    New search efforts have begun for the missing private jet that disappeared into Lake Champlain in the winter of 1971 that was carrying two crew members and three passengers. A new high-tech search using modern techniques, sophisticated side-scanning sonars, underwater vehicles and a submarine will take place.  This search will be a combined effort between […]
  • Updated Model Preservation Law For NY Municipalities

    Editorial Staff
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:00 am
    The New York State Historic Preservation Office (OPRHP) and New York State Department of State, in partnership with the Preservation League of New York State, have developed an updated model local preservation law to help municipalities preserve historic resources in their communities. The model law is available on the agency’s website here. The new model […]
  • Emancipation Days Features Solomon Northup Family

    Editorial Staff
    23 Jul 2014 | 10:36 am
    In November 2013 when Melissa Howell, descendent of Solomon Northup was asked to speak at the 2014 Peterboro Emancipation Days, little did anyone suspect that her great, great, great grandfather’s 160 year old biographical book Twelve Years a Slave would win the 2014 Academy Award for Best Motion Picture of the Year. With five producers, […]
 
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    USHistoryBlog.com

  • Which Founding Father Are You?

    klkatz
    15 Jul 2014 | 7:23 am
    With 55 men compromising, debating, agreeing and disagreeing and finally creating one document, you can imagine the number of personalities at hand... and many reputations at stake.  Which founding father are you? Take the Consitution Center's Founders Quiz to find out: http://constitutioncenter.org/foundersquiz/And if it means anything... I was James Madison.This content is copyrighted. Copyright (c) 2010 - Original post at USHistoryBlog.com Part of the USHistorySite.com Network.
  • Martin Luther King Timeline

    klkatz
    17 Jan 2013 | 6:55 pm
    Martin Luther King Timeline courtesy of OnlineCollegeCourses.com This content is copyrighted. Copyright (c) 2010 - Original post at USHistoryBlog.com Part of the USHistorySite.com Network.
  • Sydney and Max Blast Through The Past – An American History DVD series for kids.

    klkatz
    6 Nov 2012 | 10:55 am
    The past generation had Schoolhouse Rock, this new generation can now learn from Sydney and Max.  “Sydney and Max Blast Through the Past” is a new DVD series that provides a fascinating study of American history through the eyes of teenagers. It is unlike any series ever produced because it is built around the idea of teens teaching teens; kids are loving it.This series is designed for children ages 10 – 16 and is guaranteed to encourage critical thinking as viewers follow Sydney and Max’s investigation into America’s past.  The music, dialogue, and episode length were all…
  • President Biographies

    klkatz
    12 Jul 2012 | 7:28 pm
    I recently took on the endeavor of creating some content for USHistorySite.com. I figured since most of the visitors to the site were teachers looking for lesson plans and that I could complement the lesson plans with real content... So... I started with Biographies of the US Presidents.  Though I haven't completed all of them... I tried to knock out some of the most important ones.Enjoy the bios. http://ushistorysite.com/presidents_bios.phpThis content is copyrighted. Copyright (c) 2010 - Original post at USHistoryBlog.com Part of the USHistorySite.com Network.
  • Mr. Benjamin Franklin

    klkatz
    6 Mar 2012 | 9:51 pm
    Source: nndb.com via US on PinterestThis content is copyrighted. Copyright (c) 2010 - Original post at USHistoryBlog.com Part of the USHistorySite.com Network.
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    O Say Can You See?

  • Smithsonian discovers moving stories of agricultural education in search for FFA jacket

    NMAH
    17 Jul 2014 | 7:53 am
    We recently asked for your help in collecting an FFA (Future Farmers of America) jacket with a great personal story—and you came through! Intern Chris Fite reports on the nationwide jacket search and why we're preserving the history of youth agricultural education in America. Finding and collecting artifacts for the national collections can be challenging. "Determining what is important is a major step," said Curator Peter Liebhold, who led the search for the FFA jacket. "Once you know what's important, determining who might have it, and convincing them to part with a…
  • From electric hairbrushes to toning sneakers: Absurd advertising for over 100 years

    NMAH
    16 Jul 2014 | 3:45 am
    Although many of the products that Americans consume today would have been unimaginable to our forebears, the means by which they are advertised have remained relatively constant since the late 19th century. Intern Meredith Stabbe from the Division of Medicine and Science gives us a glimpse into the relationship between inventors, advertisements, and consumers since 1872. In my short few weeks working here at the museum, I have been scanning old advertising materials. Since I interned in the Division of Medicine and Science, the focus of my archiving relates to medicine. I scanned 19th and…
  • Before your kid opens a lemonade stand, try this fun activity

    NMAH
    14 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    Educator Victoria Altman introduces a new book-based summer activity to share with youngsters, especially budding entrepreneurs. Most children's lemonade stands aren't yet accepting credit cards—and it's important for kids (and adults!) to learn how to transact using coins and bills. "Lemonade in Winter: A Book About Two Kids Counting Money" is by Emily Jenkins and illustrated by G. Brian Karas Lemonade in Winter is the story of two siblings who decide to open a lemonade stand on a snowy winter day. In this book, written by Emily Jenkins and illustrated by…
  • Donor Spotlight: Preserving the past for the future

    NMAH
    10 Jul 2014 | 11:50 am
    Individual Giving Associate Lauren Collette spotlights museum member Shirley Loo. Loo grew up in Hawaii and didn't visit the Smithsonian until college, but has been deeply involved in the museum for many years. As a development professional, I am frequently asked, "What do you love most about your job?" Without a moment of hesitation, I always enthusiastically reply, "Getting to know the members!" I had the opportunity to spend time with Shirley Loo, a member of the Smithsonian Council for American History, and learned a great deal about what motivates her to give to…
  • Are these John Wilkes Booth's field glasses?

    NMAH
    7 Jul 2014 | 2:45 pm
    Curator Deborah Warner's research on a valuable accessory may reveal a connection to President Abraham Lincoln's assassin.  This intriguing object is the subject of much curatorial research Binocular field glasses were introduced in Vienna, Austria, around 1840 and soon caught the attention of those who would see things from afar. Although binocular opera glasses had been used since the 17th century, field glasses were a new style of large, rugged, and powerful binoculars designed for heavy duty use. Some military officers used field glasses in the Crimean War of the 1850s, and…
 
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    Toptenz.net

  • 10 Gateways to the Underworld

    Paul Jongko
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:10 pm
    For many of us, the underworld—Hell, Hades, Xibalba, whatever you call it—is located in a spiritual realm, only accessible to those who have departed this physical world. However, for some people, death isn’t a requirement to enter this terrible place. For them, there are certain areas where one can enter the underworld even if you’re […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Gateways to the Underworld appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Cracked History Reveals 10 Things History Got Wrong, Part Deux!

    Daniel Zarzeczny
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:01 pm
    A Brief History On July 24, 1814, British forces under Phineas Riall march to the Niagara River to halt an American force from invading Canada.  The War of 1812 is misunderstood by many Americans, with most Americans assuming the US won the war, when the truth is much more like a tie at best.  TheContinue reading... The post Cracked History Reveals 10 Things History Got Wrong, Part Deux! appeared first on Cracked History.   Source: Toptenz.net The post Cracked History Reveals 10 Things History Got Wrong, Part Deux! appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Superman’s Disguise is Actually Amazing

    Karl Smallwood
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:10 pm
    One of the hardest things to believe about Superman, other than the fact he’s an alien being with infinite, god-like power is The post Superman’s Disguise is Actually Amazing appeared first on Fact Fiend.   Source: Toptenz.net The post Superman’s Disguise is Actually Amazing appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Creepy Radio Transmissions

    Mike Brown
    22 Jul 2014 | 9:10 pm
    Numbers stations are shortwave radio stations that have dumfounded listeners for years. These mysterious stations are broadcasted worldwide and transmit seemingly random codes, phrases and other messages that can;t be decoded by untrained listeners. They can appear out of nowhere and disappear just as quickly. Confusion about their purpose has led many to believe that […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Creepy Radio Transmissions appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Cracked History Reveals 10 Things History Got Wrong!

    Daniel Zarzeczny
    22 Jul 2014 | 9:01 pm
    A Brief History On July 23, 1903, the Ford Motor Company sold its first car.  For some reason many Americans are under the impression that Henry Ford invented the automobile and that Ford was the first brand of cars.  Although Ford got into the business early in the industry’s infancy, he was far from theContinue reading... The post Cracked History Reveals 10 Things History Got Wrong! appeared first on Cracked History.   Source: Toptenz.net The post Cracked History Reveals 10 Things History Got Wrong! appeared first on Toptenz.net.
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    History Of Macedonia

  • Καγκελάριος Μέρκελ: H… νονά των Σκοπίων!

    Stern
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:25 am
    Από τον Αλέξανδρο Τάρκα *   Η ΕΠΙΔΙΩΞΗ της καγκελαρίου Α. Μέρκελ για την άσκηση ισχύος (Machtpolitik) υπονομεύεται από μια κοινή γνώμη που της χαρίζει δημοφιλία, αλλά απορρίπτει τον ισχυρό ρόλο της Γερμανίας στην εξωτερική και αμυντική πολιτική. Παρομοίως, ο υπουργός Εξωτερικών Φ. Στάινμαγιερ αντιγράφει την «πολιτική έκδοσης…
  • Ο Σύλλογος Μακεδόνων Μονάχου στη 10η Ελληνο-Βαυαρική Πολιτιστική Ημέρα

    Stern
    23 Jul 2014 | 1:18 am
      Ο Σύλλογος Μακεδόνων Μονάχου και περιχώρων παρουσίασε το παραδοσιακό δρώμενο του αποχαιρετισμού της νύφης από το πατρικό της σπίτι , στο πλαίσιο των εκδηλώσεων «Ελληνο-Βαυαρική Πολιτιστική Ημέρα» που πραγματοποιήθηκε για 10η χρονιά στο Μόναχο. Griechisch-Bayerischer Kulturtag 2014 Related posts: Σκοπιανοί : Θέλουμε πίσω την… πολιτιστική μας…
  • Μακεδονία, ο ύμνος των Μακεδόνων στο 4ο Παμμακεδονικό αντάμωμα

    Stern
    18 Jul 2014 | 2:49 am
            nomos florinas Related posts: «Σκάβει» στο DNA των Μακεδόνων
  • Μέρκελ: “Βάρος” το θέμα ονομασίας των Σκοπίων

    Stern
    15 Jul 2014 | 9:39 am
    «Βάρος» χαρακτήρισε η Γερμανίδα καγκελάριος, Άγγελα Μέρκελ, τη διαφορά μεταξύ της Ελλάδας και των Σκοπίων, για το ζήτημα του ονόματος, σε δηλώσεις της κατά τα διάρκεια της ετήσιας συνάντησης ηγετών της Νοτιανατολικής Ευρώπης, υπό τον τίτλο «Διαδικασία Μπρντο-Μπριούνι», η οποία πραγματοποιείται στο Ντουμπρόβνικ της Κροατίας.
  • Να αξιοποιήσουμε τα κέρδη μας

    Stern
    14 Jul 2014 | 12:16 am
    Κωνσταντίνος Χολέβας-Πολιτικός Επιστήμων Ας μη μεμψιμοιρούμε! Σε ορισμένα διπλωματικά μέτωπα κερδίζουμε έδαφος και πρέπει να το αξιοποιήσουμε. Αναφέρομαι στο Μακεδονικό Ζήτημα ή -αν προτιμάτε- στη σκοπιανή εμπλοκή. Τρία γεγονότα αξίζουν να υπογραμμισθούν: Α) Στο Στρασβούργο ο Έλληνας πρωθυπουργός απήντησε έξυπνα σε…
 
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    Claire Gebben

  • A new day in history

    clairegebben
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:15 pm
    Once upon a time, before I really started researching 19th century history, I lumped the entire 19th century into the Victorian era, all about propriety and manners, dominated by “prudish, hypocritical, stuffy, [and] narrow-minded” cultural attitudes (Murfin and Ray 496). While two-thirds of the 19th century did fall within Queen Victoria’s reign in England (1837-1901), I now know the Victorian America preoccupation involved mainly New England and the Deep South. Most American citizens weren’t about establishing high society. They were on the move, focused on…
  • Civil War POWs

    clairegebben
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:59 am
    In the current July/August “Echoes,” published by the Ohio Historical Society, I was delighted to find a piece about the Union Army POW camp Johnson’s Island (located in Sandusky Bay just to the south of Lake Erie). I don’t remember how I happened on the existence of the Johnson’s Island camp in my research for The Last of the Blacksmiths, but I remember thinking how spotty the information seemed. Now, the “Echoes” magazine notes, there’s a new exhibit called “Privy to History” about the Johnson’s Island Civil War Prison at…
  • Homestead Digitization Project

    clairegebben
    3 Jul 2014 | 9:17 am
    Breaking news for genealogists and family history researchers. Files detailing Nebraska’s homesteading history have been digitized and are now available to the public. The milestone’s part of a larger effort by the Homestead Digitization Project to put all homesteading documents from around the U.S. online. For more on the subject, Robert Siegel speaks with historian Blake Bell from the Homestead National Monument in Beatrice, Neb. Link to interview on NPR The post Homestead Digitization Project appeared first on Claire Gebben.
  • Buffalo robes

    clairegebben
    17 Jun 2014 | 12:39 pm
    I first included buffalo robes in the novel The Last of the Blacksmiths because it was something my grandmother used to mention when she described sleigh rides. I didn’t really know what they were like — after all, buffalo robes are not an everyday object now like they once were in the 1800′s. Then again, there’s always Wikipedia. “From the 1840s to the 1870s the great demand for buffalo robes in the commercial centres of Montreal, New York, St. Paul and St. Louis was a major factor that led to the near extinction of the species. The robes were used as blankets…
  • Guessing right

    clairegebben
    23 May 2014 | 10:11 am
    “You might want to look through Dad’s stuff, the boxes in the spare room,” my brother Craig said to me over the phone. I was visiting his house in Cincinnati in early May. He had left for work earlier that morning. “I’m not sure what’s in there.” The rest of the afternoon found me sitting on the floor of my brother’s living room, pictures and documents spread around me, as I took photo after photo of family genealogy documents, histories, and old photographs. The material I’d pulled out of storage had been sorted into 9 x 12 manila…
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    History of Massachusetts

  • Elizabeth Proctor: The Salem Witch Trials Widow

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    21 Jul 2014 | 7:06 am
    Elizabeth Proctor, wife of Salem Village farmer John Proctor, was accused of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials in 1692. The Proctors were a wealthy family who lived on a large rented farm on the outskirts of Salem Village, in … Continue reading →
  • William Dawes: The Forgotten Midnight Rider

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    17 Feb 2014 | 8:25 am
    William Dawes was a Boston tanner and one of the riders sent by Dr. Joseph Warren to alert John Hancock and Samuel Adams of the approaching British army on the night of April 18th, 1775. Dawes was born in Boston … Continue reading →
  • John Hathorne: The Salem Witch Judge

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    28 Jan 2014 | 8:19 am
    John Hathorne was a judge during the Salem Witch Trials and the great-great grandfather of author Nathaniel Hawthorne. Hathorne was born in Salem on August 5, 1641 to William Hathorne and Anne Smith. He was the fifth of nine children. … Continue reading →
  • Mercy Lewis: Orphan and Afflicted Girl

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    21 Jan 2014 | 8:03 am
    Mercy Lewis was one of the afflicted girls of the Salem Witch Trials and a servant in Thomas Putnam’s home. Lewis, the daughter of Phillip Lewis, was born in Falmouth, Maine in 1675. On August 11, 1676, three-year-old Mercy Lewis … Continue reading →
  • HBO Producing a New Drama About the Salem Witch Trials

    Rebecca Beatrice Brooks
    16 Dec 2013 | 6:24 am
    Jenji Kohan, the creator of the shows “Weeds” and “Orange is the New Black,” is currently developing a new drama about the Salem Witch Trials for HBO, according to an article on the Hollywood Reporter website: “The untitled Salem period … Continue reading →
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    Ancient Origins

  • New study shows brain-damaged child was well cared for 100,000 years ago

    aprilholloway
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:30 am
    A new study published in the journal PLOS ONE has revealed the discovery of a Paleolithic child who appears to have suffered extensive brain damage after an injury, but survived for years afterwards. The child, who lived 100,000 years ago, would have been unable to care for himself or herself, so people must have spent years looking after the child. The finding dispels beliefs that parenting in the Paleolithic was excessively harsh. The child’s skeleton was first unearthed decades ago in the Qafzeh cave system in Galilee, Israel, along with 27 other partial skeletons, stone tools and…
  • The Ingenious Invention of the Tower of the Winds

    dhwty
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:35 pm
    In ancient Greek mythology, there were eight wind gods known as the Anemoi. Each deity was given a cardinal direction from which their wind blew from. In addition, the winds were associated with different seasons and weather conditions. The four major Anemoi are Boreas (the north wind who brings the cold winter air), Notus (the south wind who brings the storms of late summer and autumn), Zephyrus (the west wind who brings the light spring and early summer breezes) and Eurus (the east wind). The four minor Anemoi are Kaikias (the north east wind), Apeliotes (the south east wind), Skiron, (the…
  • Falling Stars and Black Stone: Humanity’s Worship of Meteorites

    ancient-origins
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:14 pm
    NASA’s Curiosity rover recently discovered a massive metal meteorite on the surface of Mars. The first encounter of its type, the two meters (6.5 feet) wide iron meteorite has been named ‘Lebanon’, and scientists are eager to examine the find. Read moreSection: Unexplained Phenomena
  • Mount Nemrut and the God King of Commagene

    dhwty
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:48 am
    Mount Nemrut (Nemrut Dagi in Turkish) is a monumental site belonging to the Kingdom of Commagene, a small, independent Armenian kingdom that was formed in 162 B.C.  This was a period during which the once mighty Seleucid Empire was beginning to disintegrate, allowing certain areas of its empire to break free from the centralised control of the Seleucids. Located in the eastern Taurus mountain range in southern Turkey, near the town of Adiyaman, Mount Nemrut is home to an ancient complex built by the fourth, and arguably the most famous, king of Commagene, Antiochus I Theos (the ‘God…
  • Strange Ritualistic Burials Discovery in 5,200-Year-Old Burnt City of Iran

    aprilholloway
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:48 pm
    An archaeological team assigned to reconstruct the 5,200-year-old Burnt City, a recently listed World Heritage Site in Iran, have unearthed a series of unusual burials depicting ritualistic funerary practices, according to a report in the Tehran Times. Located near Zabol in the southeastern province of Sistan-Baluchestan, the ancient site of Shahr-i Sokhta (“Burnt City”) is one of the largest and richest Bronze Age sites in Iran and the Middle East, and is believed by some to have been the capital of an ancient civilization that flourished on the banks of the Helmand River in around 3,200…
 
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    English Legal History

  • Pirate Executions in Early Modern London

    englishlegalhistory
    9 Jul 2014 | 12:07 am
    In the East London neighborhood of Wapping behind the Town of Ramsgate Pub lies a replica of a noose and hanging scaffold. This commemorates Execution Dock, most famous as the spot where pirates were hung for their crimes in early modern London.  Execution Dock was a place of execution for over four hundred years: the last execution to take place there was 1830.  Execution Dock served as the site for all fatally condemned maritime criminals, but the cruelest treatment was reserved for those to be hung for piracy. ‘A Perspective View of the River Thames’, 1780 (Photo courtesy of National…
  • History of the Solicitors’ Training Contract

    englishlegalhistory
    10 Feb 2014 | 10:52 am
    Section 1: Contextual Overview of the Development of the English Legal Profession Before a full sketch of the history of the Training Contract can be drawn, it is necessary to provide a brief introduction to the development of the English legal profession as a whole. From the mid-12th Century, there existed a Bench of learned men at Westminster who were an extension, and administrators, of the King’s justice and heard legal pleas. After a few decades, they decided to travel the realm and administer justice locally, and naturally their number grew. The development of anything that could be…
  • History of Defamation

    englishlegalhistory
    18 Oct 2013 | 1:08 pm
    The common law test for Defamation. Before the early 1300s, actions for the predecessor of defamation were obscure and purely within the jurisdiction of the Church courts, it was not until much later that the King’s courts allowed an action for defamatory words. The often physically-based nature of the common law was not in favour of creating an offence which rested on mere words. It was much more concerned with the tangible actions and results of, for example, assault, theft and murder. It took until the 1500s before a common law action for defamation appeared. Perhaps the key reason…
  • Detection in England from Bow Street to the Met

    englishlegalhistory
    23 Jul 2013 | 10:06 am
    Detectives have had a special niche in popular culture for many years. Beginning in the nineteenth century with the works of Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins and followed later in the century by Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, detectives captured the nineteenth-century imagination. Today, crime novels, although still popular, have been supplanted by serialized crime dramas like the CSI and Law & Order franchises, and more recently by the revived Sherlock series and Luther. But where does this fascination with detection come from? Some have argued that the Victorians (and…
  • Arson in Medieval Ireland

    englishlegalhistory
    5 Jul 2013 | 11:54 am
    Photograph by Riona Doolan. The medieval Irish law tracts, popularly known as the Brehon Laws, were in use from the early medieval period to the start of the seventeenth century in Ireland. The canonical text of most of these laws were first written down between AD 650-750, and the laws with associated gloss and commentary survive in manuscripts from the twelfth to the sixteenth centuries. Though many of these laws have been rendered into English, a large number have yet to be critically edited and translated. Punitive imprisonment was not regularly used in medieval Ireland for a crime;…
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    DisputedPast

  • Early medieval bowl reveals widespread Frisian’ trading network

    Jan Huisman
    2 Jul 2014 | 10:10 am
    The discovery of a rich decorated silver bowl at an excavation in the Dutch town of Oegstgeest (near Leiden) gives us an insight into the widespread international network of its early medieval owners. The bowl was created in the sixth century, probably in the Mediterranean or Near East. Further decorations, ... Read More →
  • Former Auschwitz guards will not be prosecuted

    Jan Huisman
    22 Jun 2014 | 10:25 am
    Many of the former Auschwitz guards against whom criminal investigations were started, wont be called to justice. The elderly defendants, aged from 88 to 94 years old, are not fit enough for a trial says newsmagazine Der Spiegel sunday. Certainly eleven alleged camp guards who were arrested in April (DisputedPast reported) are now exempt from prosecution.... Read More →
  • The SS built a secret army after WWII

    Jan Huisman
    11 May 2014 | 2:31 pm
    The notorious Waffem-SS continued their military activities after the Second World War. They built on a secret army in West Germany, starting in 1949. Their aim was to fight off a Russian invasion. Since Germany wasn’t allowed to have an army, they wanted to filled the gap left by the demise of... Read More →
  • Kenya: White Terror

    Jan Huisman
    8 May 2014 | 11:30 pm
    The Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya (1952-1960) is one of the bloodiest colonial wars fought in Africa. Black Kenyans wanted to oust the British oppressors and attacked white colonists. The British response was brutal. They send in the army, set up camps and tortured and killed thousands. In this documentary,... Read More →
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    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • Alcestis

    24 Jul 2014 | 9:10 am
    Alcestis was the mythical queen of Thessaly, wife of King Admetus, who came to personify the devoted, selfless, woman and wife in ancient Greece. While the story of Admetus' courtship of Alcestis was widely told, she is best known for her devotion to her husband in taking his place in death and her return to life through the intervention of the hero Herakles (better known as Hercules). There are...
  • Megara (Wife of Hercules)

    24 Jul 2014 | 8:37 am
    Megara was the first wife of the Greek hero Herakles (better known as Hercules). She was the daughter of King Creon of Thebes who gave her in marriage to Hercules in gratitude for his help in winning back Creon's kingdom from the Minyans. Megara's story is best known through the work of the Greek playwright Euripides (480-406 BCE) and the later Roman playwright Seneca (4 BCE-65 CE) both of whom...
  • Deianira

    24 Jul 2014 | 7:24 am
    Deianira was the second wife of the Greek hero and demi-god Herakles (better known as Hercules, son of the god Zeus and the mortal woman Alcmene). She was the daughter of King Oeneus and Queen Althaea of Calydon. During the time of Hercules' famous Twelve Labors, he had taken a kind of side-adventure to sail with Jason and the Argonauts and, on this trip, met the hero Meleager, Oeneus' son...
  • The Life of Hercules in Myth and Legend

    23 Jul 2014 | 11:36 am
    Hercules is the Roman name for the Greek hero Herakles, the most popular figure from ancient Greek mythology. Hercules was the son of Zeus, king of the gods, and the mortal woman Alcmene. Zeus, who was always chasing one woman or another, took on the form of Alcmene's husband, Amphitryon, and visited Alcmene one night in her bed, and so Hercules was born a demi-god with incredible strength and stamina...
  • New: Videos, Links, and Book Reviews on AHE

    23 Jul 2014 | 12:25 am
    We are excited to announce that we've redesigned our contribute page! Now users and volunteers can submit videos in addition to articles, definitions, book reviews, and web links. If you know of great content you would like to share with us, go ahead and submit it! Anyone with knowledge of ancient history can submit content to Ancient History Encyclopedia. All submissions are reviewed by our editorial...
 
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