History

  • Most Topular Stories

  • 13,800-year-old Haida site found underwater in Canada

    Ancient Origins
    Mark Miller
    21 Dec 2014 | 4:44 pm
    Estimates of people’s presence in the Americas have ranged from about 12,000 to 50,000 years. A new study by a team of archaeologists that has been researching the subject, has found a site dating back 13,800 years, now underwater in the Juan Perez Sound off British Columbia in Canada. The underwater area they examined was once dry land, inhabited by the Haida people. The Haida have an old flood tale on Frederick Island that tells of how the peoples became dispersed in the New World.  Frederick Island is a different site than the one recently studied. The team, led by archaeologist Quentin…
  • A Christmas Carol

    New Historian
    Daryl Worthington
    20 Dec 2014 | 6:05 am
    It might not be the most critically lauded of Charles Dickens’ works, but ‘A Christmas Carol’ is probably the most well known. The tale of a miserly skinflint finding the Christmas spirit through supernatural intervention is one firmly entwined into Christmas tradition. It has been the subject of a plethora of parodies, adaptations and tributes that prove one of Dickens’ most simple allegories, was also one of his most potent. First published in 1843, A Christmas Carol was the most successful book published in Britain that winter. By Christmas it had sold six thousand…
  • Namazu-e: The Art Genre That Challenged the Tokugawa Shogunate

    The Asian History Blog
    Josh
    7 Jan 2013 | 7:39 am
    A Namazu-e print titled "Shin Yoshiwara ōnamazu yurai". In this print, Namazu has devastated the "pleasure district" of Shin Yoshiwara in Edo. The ladies of the night (and others) attempt to take their revenge, but Namazu gets a thrill from having them come into contact with him and threatens to thrash around and cause some aftershocks. (Wikimedia Commons) In 1855, a massive earthquake struck Edo (modern-day Tokyo) and killed over 10,000 people. At the time, the earthquake was widely blamed on Namazu, the monster catfish and water deity that, according to legend, lives in the waters…
  • Book Review: Bold by Peter Diamandis

    History on Air
    Jason
    3 Dec 2014 | 5:09 pm
    I’ve just started reading Bold by Peter Diamandis and I’m already hooked.  It is a fascinating book.  In the first chapter he mentioned the company Quirky, that helps inventors get their products into the market. 3D Printing And now, in chapter two I’m reading about the company 3D Systems. They make 3D printers and I want one of those so bad now!  Only a thousand dollars.  Very cool stuff!  Did you know those Invisalign braces are all 3D printed per person? Made in Space creates 3D printers that are being used in the International Space Station!  Also, discovered…
  • FDR Decides Thanksgiving

    American Presidents Blog
    Jennie W
    26 Nov 2014 | 6:22 pm
    Are you ready for Thanksgiving?  Here is a fun article talking about setting the date for Thanksgiving and the furor FDR created in 1939 when he set the date for Thanksgiving!American Thanksgiving is the fourth Thursday in November. Countless institutions depend on this date being predictable year in and year out: football teams planning their "Turkey Bowl" games, schools setting their vacation schedules, department stores deciding when to put up their Christmas decorations.But the Thanksgiving date wasn't always so reliable. For decades, the president got to decide when the holiday…
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    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Sunday 22 December 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    22 Dec 2014 | 3:00 pm
    To church in the morning, where the Reader made a boyish young sermon. Home to dinner, and there I took occasion, from the blacknesse of the meat as it came out of the pot, to fall out with my wife and my maid for their sluttery, and so left the table, and went up to read in Mr. Selden till church time, and then my wife and I to church, and there in the pew, with the rest of the company, was Captain Holmes, in his gold-laced suit, at which I was troubled because of the old business which he attempted upon my wife. So with my mind troubled I sat still, but by and by I took occasion from the…
  • Saturday 21 December 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    21 Dec 2014 | 3:00 pm
    To White Hall to the Privy Seal, where my Lord Privy Seal did tell us he could seal no more this month, for that he goes thirty miles out of town to keep his Christmas. At which I was glad, but only afeard lest any thing of the King’s should force us to go after him to get a seal in the country. Thence to Westminster Hall (having by the way drank with Mrs. Sarah and Mrs. Betty at my Lord’s lodgings), and thence taken by some Exchequer men to the Dogg, where, being St. Thomas’s day, by custom they have a general meeting at dinner. There I was and all very merry, and there I…
  • Friday 20 December 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    20 Dec 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Lay long in bed, and then up, and so to the Wardrobe to dinner, and from thence out with Mr. Moore towards my house, and in our way met with Mr. Swan (my old acquaintance), and we to a tavern, where we had enough of his old simple religious talk, and he is still a coxcomb in these things as he ever was, and tells me he is setting out a book called “The unlawfull use of lawfull things;” but a very simple fellow he is, and so I leave him. So we drank and at last parted, and Mr. Moore and I into Cornhill, it being dark night, and in the street and on the Exchange discoursed about…
  • Thursday 19 December 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    19 Dec 2014 | 3:00 pm
    This morning my wife dressed herself fine to go to the christening of Mrs. Hunt’s child, and so she and I in the way in the morning went to the Paynter’s, and there she sat till noon, and I all the while looking over great variety of good prints which he had, and by and by comes my boy to tell us that Mrs. Hunt has been at our house to tell us that the christening is not till Saturday next. So after the Paynter had done I did like the picture pretty well, and my wife and I went by coach home, but in the way I took occasion to fall out with my wife very highly about her ribbands…
  • Wednesday 18 December 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    18 Dec 2014 | 3:00 pm
    At the office upon business extraordinary all the morning, then to my Lady Sandwich’s to dinner, whither my wife, who had been at the painter’s, came to me, and there dined, and there I left her, and to the Temple my brother and I to see Mrs. Turner, who begins to be better, and so back to my Lady’s, where much made of, and so home to my study till bed-time, and so to bed. Read the annotations
 
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    History in the News

  • Bill and Hillary Clinton Board "The Last Ship"

    22 Dec 2014 | 1:20 pm
    Former U.S. president Bill Clinton and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton attended 'The Last Ship' this weekend. The standing ovations at the new Sting musical "The Last Ship" started minutes before the curtain even rose on Saturday night.
  • How President Obama unwinds

    22 Dec 2014 | 4:06 am
    For Obama, keeping an even keel takes a mix of golf, books, Nicorette - and, most importantly, time with the first family MAINE - 2010: U.S. President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle walk along a trail with their daughters Sasha and Malia on Cadillac Mountain in Bar Harbor, Maine, July 16, 2010. The First Family is on vacation for the weekend.
  • Plan for World War I memorial is dead, says Grand Rapids spokesman for last living vet

    22 Dec 2014 | 3:01 am
    A local photographer's efforts to fund a World War I memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., have been halted following congressional approval of a different plan. An annual defense spending bill that includes a pay raise for troops and money to combat ISIS also designates Pershing Park as the site for a new World War I memorial.
  • How to spot a liar: coach to crime fighters reveals common tics

    21 Dec 2014 | 9:42 pm
    Bill Clinton's head is bowed, hands masking his mouth, as his inquisitor asks: "If Monica Lewinsky said that while you were in the Oval Office area you touched her breasts, would she be lying?" The US president blinks rapidly as he pauses, then leans back, breathes deeply, and delivers a textbook politician's response: "Let me say something about all this." American deception expert Clark Freshman is showing the video clip, taken from Clinton's 1998 testimony in the sex scandal that led to his impeachment, to make a point.
  • Tom Brokaw Received an Early Christmas Gift - News That His Cancer Is In Remission

    21 Dec 2014 | 7:32 pm
    Tom Brokaw has been given the news that his cancer is in remission and he couldn't wait to let his NBC colleagues know. The 74-year-old former NBC Nightly News anchor sent a note to the employees of the network to inform them that his cancer had gone into remission.
 
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    Anglo-Dutch Wars

  • The Dutch ship Vrijheid on 21 June 1653

    Jim
    12 Dec 2014 | 3:21 pm
    I have the inventory for the Dutch warship Vrijheid, dated 21 June 1653. The thing that caught my eye was that I had thought that the Vrijheid carried 52 guns on that date, but I was wrong, the Vrijheid had 50 guns: Lower Deck 4-24pdr 18-12pdr Upper Deck 4-12pdr 20-8pdr 2-6pdr 2-3pdr
  • Dingeman Cats in 1652 to 1653

    Jim
    12 Sep 2014 | 9:58 am
    Dingeman Cats served as a captain for the Admiralty of Zeeland in 1652 and 1653. At the beginning of the First Anglo-Dutch War, he commanded a hired ship, the Dolphijn. The Dolphijn was quite small with dimensions of 105ft x 24ft x ? x 5-1/2ft. The Dolphijn was armed with 14-8pdr, 8-4pdr, and 2-3pdr. A report on 6 December 1652 gave the crew as 73 sailors and 25 sailors. That was actually after
  • What we know about the Gecroonde Liefde, Marcus Hartman's ship, in 1653

    Jim
    5 Sep 2014 | 5:20 am
    Captain Marcus Hartman commanded the Middelburg Directors' ship Gecroonde Liefde in 1653. Early in the year, Michiel De Ruyter used the ship as his temporary flagship. After that, the Gecroonde Liefde continued to serve in his squadron. The Gecroonde Liefde was one of the ships that was lost in the storm off the Texel on about 9 November 1653. We know the dimensions of the Gecroonde Liefde: 136ft
  • The Zeven Provincien on 3 March 1672

    Jim
    17 May 2014 | 9:18 am
    We have a handwritten list that includes the details for the Zeven Provincien (the Dutch fleet flagship) as of 3 March 1672:Name: Zeven Provincien Admiralty: Admiralty of the Maze or Rotterdam Built: 1665 Length in Amsterdam feet: 163 feet Beam in Amsterdam feet: 43 feet Hold in Amsterdam feet: 16-1/2 feet Deck height in Amsterdam feet: 7-1/2 feet Guns 12-36pdr 16-24pdr 12-18pdr 18-12pdr
  • Book: Dutch Ships in Various Operations in the First Anglo-Dutch War

    Jim
    13 May 2014 | 6:10 am
    I have had this book project, Dutch Ships in Various Operations in the First Anglo-Dutch War, in work for more than a decade. I would like to push to complete this as a Kindle book. I am in the process of doing the necessary reformatting. I have the information needed, although some analysis remains to be done.
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    American Presidents Blog

  • FDR Decides Thanksgiving

    Jennie W
    26 Nov 2014 | 6:22 pm
    Are you ready for Thanksgiving?  Here is a fun article talking about setting the date for Thanksgiving and the furor FDR created in 1939 when he set the date for Thanksgiving!American Thanksgiving is the fourth Thursday in November. Countless institutions depend on this date being predictable year in and year out: football teams planning their "Turkey Bowl" games, schools setting their vacation schedules, department stores deciding when to put up their Christmas decorations.But the Thanksgiving date wasn't always so reliable. For decades, the president got to decide when the holiday…
  • President Kennedy's Election: Vote Counting Fraud?

    Jennie W
    21 Nov 2014 | 12:07 am
    I bookmarked this article back during the election, but am just getting around to post it (much like my state on finally deciding important races....seriously, do we have a governor or senator yet? And yes, both were finally settled).   What was interesting about this article is that it mentioned some vote counting controversies that I didn't know about.  When I teach the 1960 election, I tend to really emphasis the use of media and how that changed the outcome, but the vote counting is interesting as most students automatically think of the 2000 election with…
  • Washington Facts

    Jennie W
    19 Nov 2014 | 10:36 pm
    So I don't know about you, but I knew most of these "forgotten" facts and I wouldn't even call them "forgotten," more ignored.  The one I didn't know was that Washington grew hemp!Like other farmers, Washington grew hemp as a cash crop, but it’s not what you think. The hemp wasn’t smoked for pleasure. It was used to make rope, paper, and other products. Washington also grew corn and wheat. He was actually quite an agricultural innovator; he introduced the concept of crop rotation. Washington, the farmer, introduced the mule to America when he bred donkeys from the King of Spain and…
  • Eisenhower on D-Day

    Jennie W
    9 Nov 2014 | 1:07 am
    This article asks the question of what did Eisenhower actually say to put D-Day into action.  Eisenhower himself didn't remember, and no one can seem to agree what he said. What would seem like it should have an historical send off really doesn't.  So what does this mean?  It comes down to Eisenhower's own character, according to this article:There is no memorable quote, in other words, because of Eisenhower's good old-fashioned Kansas modesty.  He did not have the kind of ego that spawns lofty sentiments for the press or posterity Ike was a plain speaker from the plains…
  • 7 Famous Presidential Pardons

    M
    8 Oct 2014 | 12:34 pm
    One of the powers of the American President is the ability to pardon anyone of any crime for almost any reason. Section Two, Clause on of the Constitution notes, "The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the…
 
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    History on Air

  • Book Review: Bold by Peter Diamandis

    Jason
    3 Dec 2014 | 5:09 pm
    I’ve just started reading Bold by Peter Diamandis and I’m already hooked.  It is a fascinating book.  In the first chapter he mentioned the company Quirky, that helps inventors get their products into the market. 3D Printing And now, in chapter two I’m reading about the company 3D Systems. They make 3D printers and I want one of those so bad now!  Only a thousand dollars.  Very cool stuff!  Did you know those Invisalign braces are all 3D printed per person? Made in Space creates 3D printers that are being used in the International Space Station!  Also, discovered…
  • Revolutionizing the Historic Slot Machine

    Jason
    17 Oct 2014 | 7:01 am
    The one-armed bandit is one of those things that every casino gamer who lived around the early 1900s is familiar with. Well, actually, anyone who sees an old slot machine – whether a novice or experienced gambler – will know how to play it. After all, how much simpler could a machine get? You pull a lever, wait for the reels to stop spinning, and hope that you get matching symbols. The Liberty Bell is considered the godfather of the modern slot machines. It was created by Charles Fey, a car mechanic based in San Francisco, in 1895. It is a three-reel model that is still used in some…
  • Sinclair ZX81

    Jason
    5 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    Sinclair ZX81 I wasn’t lucky enough to own a Sinclair when I was younger.  When the Sinclair ZX81 was released on March 5, 1981, I was only two years old.  Although, my father a fellow geek did give me his old Compaq portable when I was old enough to use it.  It was released two years later in January 1983.  But enough of my childhood memories this post is about the Sinclair.  The ZX81 was originally released only in the United Kingdom in March 1981 and later came to the shores of the US as the Timex Sinclair 1000.  It was designed to be a home computer.  It was designed on the cheap…
  • USS Cyclops disappears in Bermuda Triangle

    Jason
    4 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    USS Cyclops I’m a sucker for a Bermuda Triangle story, and this one fits the bill.  On March 4, 1918 USS Navy ship Cyclops set out for Baltimore.  She was heading there most likely to make repairs as her starboard engine had a cracked cylinder and in the previous port water had been seen above the Plimsoll line, the line on the hull that marks the legal limit to which a ship sits in the water.  The Cyclops was a collier, which is a cargo ship mostly used by the Navy to haul coal.  It was launched on May 7, 1910.  Cyclops was last known to be traveling through the Bermuda Triangle when…
  • Blood and Tyrants: Chapters 17-19 *Spoilers*

    Jason
    26 Feb 2014 | 8:00 am
    Blood of Tyrants It has been a terribly long time since I posted any of my updates for this book.  Here is what happened.  First about 6 months ago my wife gave birth to a beautiful little girl named Emily.  Anyone who has a newborn knows that this means your personal times goes to zero.  And that is exactly what happened to me.  While I still had time to do a blog post here and there, I didn’t have time to read and highlight as I went through Blood of Tyrants by Logan Beirne.  When a little free time did crop up I realized that while I was enjoy this books content, I wasn’t…
 
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    african american history - Google News

  • Racial unrest among Black History Month event topics - Contra Costa Times

    22 Dec 2014 | 1:05 pm
    Racial unrest among Black History Month event topicsContra Costa TimesNational African American History Month celebrates the achievements and contributions of African-Americans throughout the history of the United States, and is deeply rooted in Newark. The Afro-American Cultural and Historical Society Inc., Tri-City
  • African-American Facts for the Week of: December 21, 2014 - Indianapolis Recorder (blog)

    22 Dec 2014 | 8:23 am
    Indianapolis Recorder (blog)African-American Facts for the Week of: December 21, 2014Indianapolis Recorder (blog)I think that many black people don't celebrate their heritage or history in this country enough and conform and assimilate to the euro centric standard. How many black people know what tribe they descended from? How many black people celebrate Kwanzaa ...Reflections on Kwanzaa 2014Luther College News (blog)all 3 news articles »
  • Donna Brazile to kick off Black History Month in San Antonio - San Antonio Business Journal

    19 Dec 2014 | 3:11 pm
    San Antonio Business JournalDonna Brazile to kick off Black History Month in San AntonioSan Antonio Business JournalBrazile is one of the most influential African American women in politics today. She made history by serving as Al Gore's 2000 presidential campaign manager. Brazile was the first African American woman to serve in such a role. Washingtonian Magazine ...
  • Christine Wigfall Morris, Clearwater's first African-American librarian, dies ... - Tampabay.com

    19 Dec 2014 | 7:36 am
    Tampabay.comChristine Wigfall Morris, Clearwater's first African-American librarian, dies Tampabay.comAlthough she retired from the Clearwater library system in 1982, Morris continued with her life's passion by volunteering on the Clearwater Library Advisory Board, the Friends of the Clearwater Library as well as the Pinellas County African-American
  • Genetic study reveals surprising ancestry of many Americans - Science AAAS

    18 Dec 2014 | 11:10 am
    Science AAASGenetic study reveals surprising ancestry of many AmericansScience AAASIn all three populations, they found the same signal: European ancestors tended to be male, while African and Native American ancestors tended to be female. That imbalance reflects the fact that for much of U.S. history, European men were the most ...Genetic Study Reveals Average African-American Genome is Nearly A Quarter Atlanta Black Star23andMe Study Sketches Genetic Portrait of the United StatesNewswise (press release)America really is a "melting pot," study saysRedOrbitDaily…
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    History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

  • December 22, 1956: First gorilla born in captivity

    21 Dec 2014 | 9:00 pm
    On this day in 1956, a baby gorilla named Colo enters the world at the Columbus Zoo in Ohio, becoming the first-ever gorilla born in captivity. Weighing in at approximately 4 pounds, Colo, a western lowland gorilla whose name was a combination of Columbus and Ohio, was the daughter of Millie and Mac, two gorillas captured in French Cameroon, Africa, who were brought to the Columbus Zoo in 1951. Before Colo's birth, gorillas found at zoos were caught in the wild, often by brutal means. In order to capture a gorilla when it was young and therefore still small enough to handle, hunters…
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    The New York History Blog

  • Help Keep The NY History Blog Going In 2015

    John Warren
    22 Dec 2014 | 2:00 pm
    Last year your contributions helped The New York History Blog to promote news and events related to the state’s history, to foster a shared mission among the history community, and to provide announcements of upcoming conferences and exhibits, new publications and online resources – and so much more. It’s time to start our fundraising campaign […]
  • Bruce Dearstyne: Mixed Message for NYS History

    Bruce Dearstyne
    22 Dec 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Four recent news items have pointed to the resource limitations that history programs face but also to the potential for new sources of support. The first was the radio interview with Dr. Charles Gehring, the long-time translator of the Dutch colonial records held by the State Library and State Archives.  Gehring confirmed the immense historical […]
  • NYS Preservation Awards Announced

    Editorial Staff
    22 Dec 2014 | 12:00 pm
    The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (State Parks) have announced that seven distinctive historic preservation projects received 2014 New York State Historic Preservation Awards. Established in 1980, the state preservation awards are given by State Parks each year to honor excellence in the protection and rejuvenation of New York’s historic […]
  • NYS Museum Opens Native American Art Exhibit

    Editorial Staff
    22 Dec 2014 | 10:00 am
    The New York State Museum has opened a new exhibition featuring contemporary Native American artwork. “Represent: Contemporary Native American Art” features twenty-one artworks created by eighteen artists from Native American Nations in New York State. On display through September 20, 2015, the exhibition features a variety of contemporary Native American artwork. From baskets and beadwork […]
  • The Remarkable Flying Dryer Family

    Lawrence P. Gooley
    22 Dec 2014 | 7:15 am
    In the weeks and months following the amazing story of survival in the Adirondacks in January 1935, when the four-man crew of a downed Curtis Condor plane were rescued from the clutches of death, further details surfaced in the media. The two uninjured passengers had considered striking off to the south in search of help. […]
 
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    Toptenz.net

  • 10 Obscure Christmas Carols You Should Listen to Instead of Jingle Bells Yet Again

    Mark Hill
    21 Dec 2014 | 9:10 pm
    Christmas carols are great… for a while. But no matter how much you love the holidays you can only hear “Deck the Halls” so many times before you want to deck someone’s face, and having to hear b-list celebrities mangle their way through the classics doesn’t help. But “Jingle Bells,” “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” “White […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 Obscure Christmas Carols You Should Listen to Instead of Jingle Bells Yet Again appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Naked Girls on Bikes

    Beth Michaels
    21 Dec 2014 | 9:02 pm
    A Brief History In September of 2014, a female Columbian cyclist team created a stir when their uniforms, or kits as they are known in the cycling world, made the headlines.  Normally, such uniforms are commented on for their aerodynamic qualities, but these were literally “racy.”  And by racy we don’t mean good for racing…  With nude, orContinue reading... The post Naked Girls on Bikes appeared first on History and Headlines.   Source: Toptenz.net The post Naked Girls on Bikes appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Top 10 Schools In Fictional Worlds It Would Suck To Attend

    Karl Smallwood
    20 Dec 2014 | 9:10 pm
    As we’ve endeavoured to prove on Toptenz and our sister sites, learning is all kinds of awesome and we should all try to do it as much as possible. With that said, you’d think that learning in a place full of dragons or under the tutelage of an aging Japanese man would be at least […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post Top 10 Schools In Fictional Worlds It Would Suck To Attend appeared first on Toptenz.net.
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    History Of Macedonia

  • ΥΠΠΟΑ: Η γεωφυσική διασκόπηση και η γεωλογική χαρτογράφηση του λόφου Καστά στην Αμφίπολη

    Stern
    22 Dec 2014 | 5:26 am
    Η γεωφυσική διασκόπηση και η γεωλογική χαρτογράφηση του λόφου Καστά στην Αμφίπολη ξεκίνησαν την 11η Νοεμβρίου 2014 και διεξήχθησαν με αποσπασματικό χαρακτήρα, λόγω των δυσμενών καιρικών συνθηκών. Την ερευνητική ομάδα αποτελούν ο επικεφαλής καθηγητής Γρηγόρης Τσόκας, Διευθυντής του Εργαστηρίου Εφαρμοσμένης Γεωφυσικής ΑΠΘ, ο…
  • Επιστολή των Παμμακεδονικών Ενώσεων Υφηλίου προς την εφημερίδα Sunday Times

    Stern
    20 Dec 2014 | 10:03 am
    WORLD PAN-MACEDONIAN ASSOCIATIONS Επικοινωνία: Νίνα Γκατζούλη Συντονίστρια Επιτροπής Παμμακεδονικών Ενώσεων Υφηλίου Email: ninagatz@comcast.net Αγαπητέ κ. Συντάκτη, Εμείς, οι ανά τον κόσμο Μακεδονικοί Σύλλογοι και εκπρόσωποι των 3,5 εκατομμυρίων Μακεδόνων γράφουμε να σας εκφράσουμε την ανησυχία μας για το άρθρο της Ανθής Καρασάββα με τίτλο: «Βρέθηκε…
  • Οι Σκοπιανοί προκαλούν ακόμη και στο Μόντρεαλ

    Stern
    19 Dec 2014 | 2:53 am
    Όπως καταγγέλλουν οι διοργανωτές της έκθεσης «Οι Έλληνες: Από τον Αγαμέμνονα στον Μέγα Αλέξανδρο», που «φιλοξενείται» αυτές τις μέρες στο Αρχαιολογικό Μουσείου Πουάντ α Καγιέρ του Μόντρεαλ, δέχονται υβριστικά μηνύματα από Σκοπιανούς πολίτες. Εξάλλου, από τη σελίδα της στο διαδίκτυο, με ανακοίνωση, στην οποία η Ελλάδα…
  • ΥΠΠΟΑ: Μελέτη οστεολογικού υλικού που βρέθηκε στο ταφικό μνημείο της Αμφίπολης

    Stern
    19 Dec 2014 | 1:21 am
    Επειδή, χτες και σήμερα, διακινούνται στο διαδίκτυο ανυπόστατες “πληροφορίες” και εικασίες, σχετικά με το οστεολογικό υλικό, που βρέθηκε στο ταφικό μνημείο της Αμφίπολης, ανακοινώνονται τα εξής: Η μελέτη του οστεολογικού υλικού, που βρέθηκε στον τέταρτο χώρο του ταφικού μνημείου, στο λόφο Καστά, ανατέθηκε σε διεπιστημονική…
  • Θεσσαλονίκη : Υπέρ της μελέτης για την ανάδειξη των αρχαιοτήτων στο σταθμό «Βενιζέλου» του Μετρό γνωμοδότησε το ΚΑΣ

    Stern
    17 Dec 2014 | 3:41 am
    Υπέρ της μελέτης ανάδειξης αρχαιοτήτων εντός του ανασχεδιασμένου σταθμού «Βενιζέλου», στο πλαίσιο των εργασιών για την κατασκευή του Μετρό Θεσσαλονίκης, τάχθηκαν χθες ομόφωνα τα μέλη του Κεντρικού Αρχαιολογικού Συμβουλίου. Η μελέτη, που για να υλοποιηθεί προϋποθέτει την απόσπαση και επανατοποθέτηση   των αρχαιοτήτων στην…
 
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    Claire Gebben

  • Kings of Kallstadt

    clairegebben
    8 Dec 2014 | 4:43 pm
    On the first weekend of my arrival in Freinsheim this past September, my relatives and I sallied forth to hike the vineyards in celebration of the annual Freinsheim Weinwanderung. Ina, Manfred, Matthias and Lenny (the collie) on the first night of the Weinwanderung Friday evening, as we headed out of town to ascend to a hilltop vantage point and await the opening night fireworks (an occasion that included the sampling of several wines), my relatives encountered friends of theirs, so we stopped to talk. “Here is our American relative, Claire Gebben,” they said (I think),…
  • What Frankfurt Book Fair is (and isn’t)

    clairegebben
    2 Dec 2014 | 8:00 pm
    This October, I attended the international Frankfurt Book Fair (Frankfurter Buchmesse) for the first time. The Fair was everything I expected it to be — a massive assembly of book industry professionals gathered to do business in publishing and celebrate books. And more. Luckily, I didn’t go alone. I had my trusted friend Angela to help me navigate, a good thing because even though just about everyone speaks English, it really is important to know German as well. The halls were mobbed with 270,000 people speaking every language imaginable. What was it like to be among them?
  • Tis the season

    clairegebben
    14 Nov 2014 | 11:43 am
    Tis the season, right? The season of shorter days, candlelight, “peace on earth” ringing out in choral harmonies. Lois Brandt launches her book “Maddie’s Fridge” at Bellevue Bookstore in September.And, tis the season of holiday shopping madness. This year, I’m jumping in with both feet to support local independent book stores. On Saturday, November 29, it’s my privilege to join authors Janet Lee Carey, Robert Dugoni, Dana Sullivan, Samantha Vamos, Dan Richards, Kazu Kibuishi Justina Chen, Christina Dudley, and William Dietrich at Bellevue University…
  • Mysterious forces at work

    clairegebben
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:30 pm
    Many wonderful things occurred during my recent visit to Germany. For instance, this interview published in Die Rheinpfalz newspaper. Look, Mom, I speak perfect German! (not) The interviewer spoke English, naturally. She recorded our talk, then translated it into German. The photo she used was taken in the market square in the heart of the old town of Freinsheim. We sat on a bench just to the right for the interview. Still in Freinsheim a week later, I gave a book presentation on The Last of the Blacksmiths at the Altes Spital Cultural Center in Freinsheim to a full house — about 60…
  • Historic Frankfurt

    clairegebben
    14 Oct 2014 | 2:34 pm
    Early last Saturday, when in Frankfurt, Germany, my very kind host Mia asked me what I wanted to see. The Saturday market? The older, historic part of town? It had been a long week, and quite frankly, my brain wasn’t firing on all cylinders. It was my last day there. I’d just spent three days and very long hours browsing the huge, international Frankfurt Book Fair. Foremost in my mind now was locating the airport in time for my departure flight the next morning. So I shrugged. “Anything’s fine, whatever you think.” Mia hesitated, then suggested we visit the…
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    The Asian History Blog

  • The First Chinese Rice Cooker?

    Josh
    16 Dec 2014 | 7:30 am
    Wow....it's been almost two years since I last posted at this blog. I am so sorry for the lack of new posts since then. Between being tied down with my own eBay business and other projects, it just became hard to find the time to post anything new. Now that I have a little more time to post some new material, I'll be sure to post here as often as I can.Now I'd like to take the time to share a little something with you guys that I found while doing a web search on Baidu the other day. It's an old Chinese news article, but still fascinating nonetheless!In 2007, a giant kettle dating back to the…
  • Namazu-e: The Art Genre That Challenged the Tokugawa Shogunate

    Josh
    7 Jan 2013 | 7:39 am
    A Namazu-e print titled "Shin Yoshiwara ōnamazu yurai". In this print, Namazu has devastated the "pleasure district" of Shin Yoshiwara in Edo. The ladies of the night (and others) attempt to take their revenge, but Namazu gets a thrill from having them come into contact with him and threatens to thrash around and cause some aftershocks. (Wikimedia Commons) In 1855, a massive earthquake struck Edo (modern-day Tokyo) and killed over 10,000 people. At the time, the earthquake was widely blamed on Namazu, the monster catfish and water deity that, according to legend, lives in the waters…
  • Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

    Josh
    25 Dec 2012 | 3:13 am
    Here's wishing all of you out there a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! May 2013 be a happy and prosperous year for each and every one of you and may all of your New Year resolutions come true.Also, thank you so much for your visits to this blog since I started it earlier this year and I do apologise for not having posted anything new over the past month. I've started some new blogs here as of late and have been busy getting those set up. I plan on making some new posts sometime soon now that I've got a little more time, so stay tuned!Anyway, enjoy the rest of your 2012 and thanks…
  • Konosuke Matsushita and the "Bullet Lamp"

    Josh
    22 Nov 2012 | 1:03 am
    A Japanese motorcycle policeman with a "bullet lamp" circa 1925. (Wikimedia Commons)Konosuke Matsushita was a man of many talents who truly changed the world around him with his ideas. He was a man who started a little company out of nothing that became a major international corporation. He made a number of inventions that were highly innovative during the early 20th century, such as two-way socket light bulbs, light sockets that could charge any electrical appliance, and electrical plugs and sockets that were more efficient than any others available at the time.However, Matsushita's one…
  • King Naresuan and the Wild Tiger Corps

    Josh
    14 Nov 2012 | 5:50 pm
    Statue of King Naresuan at Naresuan University, Pitsanulok, Thailand. One of Thailand's most famous national heroes is King Naresuan. Naresuan was the king of the Ayutthaya kingdom who, in the late 16th and early 17th centuries, drove the Burmese who occupied a large part Siam (Thailand) out of the kingdom and basically crushed their empire, returning Siam to its full glory. In essence, he is much like America's first president and military commander George Washington and the American Revolutionary War guerrilla leader "Swamp Fox" Francis Marion rolled into one.In the year 1600, the…
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    Ancient Origins

  • The Mysteries of the Coddu Vecchiu Tombs of Giants

    mrreese
    22 Dec 2014 | 4:10 am
    During the Bronze Age (3300 – 700 BC), the Nuragic civilization built what are known as the Tombs of Giants (Tomba dei Gigantic). These megalithic gallery graves were used by the Nuragic people as public tombs, for the burials of many individuals from these early societies. Massive in size and astonishing to view, the giants’ grave at Coddu Vecchiu in Sardinia is one example that represents a somewhat mysterious and intriguing part of human history – providing some general answers as to the burial rituals of ancient human civilizations, but also leaving many questions unanswered.Read…
  • 13,800-year-old Haida site found underwater in Canada

    Mark Miller
    21 Dec 2014 | 4:44 pm
    Estimates of people’s presence in the Americas have ranged from about 12,000 to 50,000 years. A new study by a team of archaeologists that has been researching the subject, has found a site dating back 13,800 years, now underwater in the Juan Perez Sound off British Columbia in Canada. The underwater area they examined was once dry land, inhabited by the Haida people. The Haida have an old flood tale on Frederick Island that tells of how the peoples became dispersed in the New World.  Frederick Island is a different site than the one recently studied. The team, led by archaeologist Quentin…
  • The Enigmatic Loki, a Trickster among Gods in Norse Mythology

    Ryan Stone
    21 Dec 2014 | 2:29 pm
    The Norse trickster god, Loki is undoubtedly the most debated figure from Norse mythology to this day.  Though he appears to be a scheming, mischievous deity who has no real loyalties, scholars still explore what his purpose might have been in the ancient stories. Was he merely a plot device, a foil for the AEsir, the pantheon of gods in Norse religion? His character surely meant more to the non-Christian Scandinavians than can be gleaned now, and though that purpose cannot be fully realized due to a lack of sufficient sources, an overview of who Loki was and what he did can loosely be…
  • Unidentified Flying Objects – the reality, the cover-up and the truth

    johnblack
    21 Dec 2014 | 4:35 am
    Unidentified Flying Objects, or UFOs as they are commonly known, have been witnessed by millions of people all over the world and have been recorded in history books, myths, legends and traditions for thousands of years. However, many accounts that are recorded in ancient texts are dismissed as mere myths and legends, while UFO sightings that have taken place in the last few centuries have been classified as misinterpretations of natural phenomena, illusions, or conspiracy theories.Read moreSection: NewsUnexplained Phenomena
  • Five da Vinci inventions that could have revolutionized the history of technology

    aprilholloway
    20 Dec 2014 | 4:54 pm
    Leonardo da Vinci is one of the most famous artists in history. His  genius, however, was not just in his art; Leonardo was also a brilliant inventor in the fields of civil engineering, chemistry, hydrodynamics, optics, mechanical engineering, pyrotechnics, anatomy, and physics. He envisioned many ideas long before the technology to build them actually existed, meaning that many of his designs, from helicopters to armored vehicles, calculators, diving suits, and robots, never came to fruition. If they had been built, they may have revolutionized the history of technology, but it is clear the…
 
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    DisputedPast

  • Golden jewellery found on a New Kingdom mummy

    Jan Huisman
    3 Dec 2014 | 6:57 am
    Archaeologists found a mummy while cleaning a Middle Kingdom (2000 BC – 17000 BC) burial site on Luxor’s west bank. The spanish archaeological mission led by Myriam Seco unearthed the mummy within the ruins of a temple of King Thutmose III. The mummy itself is in a poor state, but... Read full history →
  • Genetic proof: Remains of Richard III are really his

    Jan Huisman
    2 Dec 2014 | 9:24 am
    Genetic evidence proof that the human remain found beneath a parking lot in Leicester last year really belonged to Richard III. According to the genetic analysis, the king had blue eyes and blond hair, characteristics that match contemporary portraits of the 15th century monarch. The skeleton’s genetic material was compared... Read full history →
  • Archaeologists unearth an unknown Roman god

    Jan Huisman
    26 Nov 2014 | 8:29 am
    Unknown Roman god (photo: Peter Jülich) A Roman sanctuary is found in an ancient temple in the southeast of Turkey with a depiction of a mysterious and unknown Roman god in it. On it, the god rises up from a plant and may be a fusion of Near Eastern and... Read full history →
  • History’s most unexpected veggies? The bloodthirsty Roman gladiators

    Jan Huisman
    9 Nov 2014 | 7:32 am
    According to popular belief, meat eaters are more aggressive and energetic than vegetarians . How is it then that some of the most brutal and aggressive warriors from history, Roman gladiators, ate mostly plants and grains? New research of the medical university of Vienna suggests just that. The researchers analyzed by... Read full history →
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    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • China's Tang Dynasty Golden Age

    22 Dec 2014 | 9:00 am
    China's Tang dynasty golden age is routinely described as one of the most brilliant eras in Chinese history. Under Tang rule and leadership, China became the wealthiest, most populous, and most sophisticated civilization on earth. While exerting political hegemony and a powerful cultural influence across East Asia, China was also open to influences from its Turkic and Indian neighbors. In this exclusive...
  • Finding Roman Bridges in Provence, France

    20 Dec 2014 | 9:00 am
    "Pontem perpetui mansurum in saecula mundi" (I have built a bridge which will last forever) Caius Julius Lacer, builder of the Alcntara Bridge Ancient Roman bridges represent one of the greatest wonders of the ancient world. They are an exceptional feat of Roman construction and I hold a certain fascination for these impressive ancient structures. Naturally, I always look for traces of Roman bridges...
  • 10 Creatures From Greek Mythology

    19 Dec 2014 | 9:00 am
    The mythology of the ancient Greeks is positively packed with stories involving weird and wonderful creatures. Represented on pottery, in sculpture, and in literary tradition, they typically create havoc with the best laid plans of the Greek heroes but they could also prove helpful in certain situations. Hercules, Odysseus, Theseus, Perseus, Bellerophon, and Jason all had to fight monsters which were...
  • Drust I

    19 Dec 2014 | 7:00 am
    Drust I (also known as Drest I, Drest son of Irb, and Drest son of Erb) was an early king of the Picts known as "The King of One Hundred Battles" that he seems to have been victorious in. His reign is given as 406-451 CE, 413-451 CE, 424-451 CE, 432-451 CE, or 424-453 CE ,and his lifespan as 407-478 CE, depending on which of the primary sources one accepts. The Picts themselves left no written...
  • The Battle of Dun Nectain

    18 Dec 2014 | 11:52 am
    The Battle of Dun Nechtain (also known as The Battle of Dunnichen, The Battle of Nechtanemere, Lin Garan, and The Battle of Nechtan) was a pivotal engagement between the Northumbrians under their king Ecgfrith and the Picts under the leadership of their king Brude Mac Bile (also known as King Bridei III). The battle took place at 3:00 pm (15.00) on Saturday, 20 May, 685 CE. The precise dating of the engagement...
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    History Now

  • 20 Incredible History Pictures pt.8

    19 Dec 2014 | 9:01 am
     1) Australian soldier sitting in the Mud with his head in his hand on the Western front, World War I2) Son runs to hug his father for the last time before WWII3) Bomb damage to Tokyo following United States raids on the city during World War II4) Memorial House of the Bulgarian Communist Party, Buzludja5) Soviet Troops Take a Break During the Siege of Breslau (1945)6) Russian soldiers teaching the Cossack dance to German prisoners of war. Eastern Front (1915)7) The Reims cathedral hit by a German shell (1916)8) Jackie Kennedy Takes a Selfie with…
  • In Short: The Conquistadors

    17 Dec 2014 | 8:02 am
    Hernan CortesThe men that conquered and explored central and south America in the 16th century are called the Conquistadors. The word is Spanish and simply means conqueror.The most famous leaders of the Conquistadors were Hernan Cortes and Francisco Pizarro. One conquered the Aztec empire (present-day Mexico), the other the Inca Empire in the south west of South America.Their army contained mostly second and third borne sons who could after Spanish law not inherit anything, only the first-born could. They sought after the gold and treasures of this new mysterious world called, America.On…
  • 20 Incredible History Pictures pt.7

    14 Dec 2014 | 9:07 am
    1) Firemen wearing Vintage Smoke Masks2) Soviet Soldier with a bust of Hitler in Berlin (1945)3) A B-17, P-51 and a F4F Wildcat do an ultra low pass. In 1991 the CAF partnered with the Don't Mess With Texas Campaign to create an Anti-Littering Commercial.4) U.S. Air Force, World War II5) Attempted assassination of pope john paul II (1981)6) A little girl hammers up a request to Father Christmas above her bed at the Brecknock Blind School for Children (1925)7) A South Vietnamese soldier uses the end of a dagger to beat a farmer for allegedly supplying government…
  • In Short: Inuit

    10 Dec 2014 | 9:41 am
    The Inuit are the indigenous people of the Arctic. They probably came during different migration episodes from Asia to America. They have developed special skills in order to survive in this hostile environment. Skills they acquired over 5000 years living in this region. Inuit means “Human being”. Often people call them “Eskimo”. Eskimo means something like "raw meat eaters", which does not sound very nice. Since the term "Eskimo" is sometimes pejoratively understood, we now try to use Inuit to be more respectful.Skilled Hunters and fast dogsThe Inuit were very skilled hunters. They…
  • 20 Incredible History Pictures pt.6

    7 Dec 2014 | 5:08 am
    1) Corporal Yukio Araki, holding a puppy, with four other pilots of the 72nd Shinbu Squadron at Bansei (1945)2) A curious Italian woman inspects the kilt of a Scottish soldier near the Coliseum after the liberation of Rome (1944)3) New York shoe shine boys photographed by stanley kubrick (1947)4) Ray Campbell vs Dick Hyland (1913)5) 101st Airborne paratoopers paint each others faces on the eve of their jump into the invasion of Normandy (1944)6) A German soldier who got his arm blown off in battle7) Dead soldier beneath crucifix WWI (1917)8) Gandhi’s…
 
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    New Historian

  • Iron Age ‘Patio’ Discovered

    Adam Steedman Thake
    20 Dec 2014 | 6:10 am
    An Iron Age house has been discovered on the Northumberland coast. With fine views of the sea, the location is just as desirable with people today as when the ancient house was built, 2,500 years ago. The major excavation project involved over 700 volunteers and was led by a team of archaeologists from Archaeological Research Services Ltd. This vast team managed to uncover the Iron Age site, believed to be from around 300 BCE, overlooking picturesque Druridge Bay. From their excavations, it appears the house was constructed in several phases. The house was originally of timber construction,…
  • A Christmas Carol

    Daryl Worthington
    20 Dec 2014 | 6:05 am
    It might not be the most critically lauded of Charles Dickens’ works, but ‘A Christmas Carol’ is probably the most well known. The tale of a miserly skinflint finding the Christmas spirit through supernatural intervention is one firmly entwined into Christmas tradition. It has been the subject of a plethora of parodies, adaptations and tributes that prove one of Dickens’ most simple allegories, was also one of his most potent. First published in 1843, A Christmas Carol was the most successful book published in Britain that winter. By Christmas it had sold six thousand…
  • Researchers Discover Gothic Cathedrals Blended Iron and Stone

    Sarah Carrasco
    20 Dec 2014 | 5:57 am
    By using radiocarbon dating on the metal found in Gothic cathedrals, a team made up of specialists in various disciplines has found that iron was used to strengthen stone during the construction process. Their study sheds a whole new light on the mechanical skill and intents of cathedral builders. The study was the result of a collaboration between the Laboratoire archéomatériaux et prévision de l’altération (CNRS/CEA), the Laboratoire de mesure du carbone 14 (CNRS/CEA/IRD/IRSN/French ministry of Culture and Communication) and “Histoire des pouvoirs, savoirs et…
  • New Discovery Shows Our Jawed Ancestors Didn’t Kill Off Their Cousins, the Sea Did

    Sarah Carrasco
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:55 am
    According to ScienceDaily.com, and research done by Manchester University, our jawed fish ancestors may not have been the reason for the extinction of their jawless cousins, as has always been assumed. Dr. Robert Sansom, from the University of Manchester, believes that rising sea levels were the more likely cause. In order to fully understand the significance of this discovery, it’s important to understand human evolution and how fish were involved in it. The first known vertebrates were simple jawless sea creatures known as Agnatha. Agnatha had cartilaginous skeletons -that is, their…
  • Bone Disease Found in 16th Century Sailors

    Adam Steedman Thake
    19 Dec 2014 | 8:51 am
    Sailors on Henry VIII’s flagship, the Mary Rose, may have suffered from rickets. By using state-of-the-art laser technology, the bones of sailors have revealed remarkable new evidence. The famous Mary Rose sank in battle on the 19th July 1545, resulting in the deaths of over 400 men on board. She sank in the Solent, the straits north of the Isle of Wight. The environment of the Solent seabed has meant that the ship and sailors are incredibly well preserved; the silt deposits there have protected against decay and damage. Using Raman spectroscopy – a pioneering, non-destructive…
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    The List Love » History

  • 10 New Year Facts You Need to Know

    The List Love
    22 Dec 2014 | 5:31 am
    New Year is celebrated all over the world. Loved ones in many nations come together to celebrate a new stage in their lives. It is a time when we can look to the future and feel excited for the possibilities it will bring. The List Love cannot wait for an exciting 2015, which is why we’re offering 10 New Year facts you need to know. 1. New Year’s Day New Year’s Day is the oldest celebrated holiday, as Babylonians first celebrated the event on 23rd March, around 2000BC. So, yeah, it’s pretty old! They chose to celebrate New Year in March as it marked the beginning of…
  • 10 Crazy UK Laws That Will Make You Laugh

    The List Love
    17 Dec 2014 | 5:27 am
    Many people have a problem with UK’s legal system, what with the country’s lenient sentencing and the convenient prison quarters. The UK also has some pretty outdated laws, so The List Love is offering 10 crazy UK laws that will make you laugh. 1. Houses of Parliament If you’re going to die, don’t do it in the Houses of Parliament. It’s illegal. It has since been voted the UK’s most absurd law. 2. Postage Stamp It is an act of treason to place a postage stamp that bears a British monarch upside down. 3. Tropical Fish Store It is an illegal act for a woman…
  • 10 Christmas Tradition Origins You Must Know

    The List Love
    15 Dec 2014 | 5:51 am
    Many of us enjoy hanging out our stockings, placing a festive wreath on our front door or partaking in the odd Christmas carol – but have you ever thought about how these festive traditions were born? Well, wonder no more, as The List Love is providing 10 Christmas tradition origins you must know. 1. Christmas Many believe Christmas all began as a way of honouring the birth of Jesus Christ. Whilst that is true, it was also born from the Roman tradition called Saturnalia, which is a festival that honours the god of agriculture, the winter solstice and the planet Saturn. Christmas…
  • 10 Facts About the Killer Clown, John Wayne Gacy

    The List Love
    11 Dec 2014 | 4:00 am
    John Wayne Gacy was as American serial killer and rapist, who was convicted of the murder and sexual assault of at least 33 teenage boys and young men between 1972 and 1978. He was sentenced to death for 12 of the murders on 13th March, 1980, and spent 14 years on death row before he was executed on 10th May, 1994, by lethal injection at the Stateville Correctional Center. He is now regarded as one of the world’s most notorious serial killers of all time. To provide an insight into his life and mind, here are 10 facts about the killer clown, John Wayne Gacy. 1. A Loyal Member of the…
  • 10 Television History Facts You Should Know

    The List Love
    3 Dec 2014 | 4:35 am
    John Logie Baird made technological history when the first transmission of a human face was seen on television on 30th October, 1925. Since then, the world has fallen in love with TV, and this invention inspired multiple technologies that now define modern life. Many people, however, know very little about TV history, which is why The List Love is taking a look back with 10 television history facts you should know. 1. The Human Face The human face that was first aired on Baird’s TV screen was his office boy, William Taynton, who the inventor paid two shillings and a sixpence per week to…
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