History

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  • The Last American Vampire

    History in the Headlines
    Christopher Klein
    31 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    Credit: La_Corivo/iStockphotos.com Edwin Brown was wasting away. For the better part of two years, he grew increasingly thin and weak. As tuberculosis ravaged the once-strapping young man in March 1892, Edwin struggled to breathe as he continually coughed up blood. He had sought a cure in the rarified air and mineral waters of Colorado Springs, Colorado, but the 18-month trip offered no healing powers and only left him homesick for a small town in America’s tiniest state. Edwin Brown returned home to Exeter, Rhode Island, where his father tilled the soil as a Yankee farmer. George Brown had…
  • Wednesday 30 October 1661

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys
    Samuel Pepys
    30 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    All the morning at the office. At noon played on my Theorbo, and much pleased therewith; it is now altered with a new neck. In the afternoon Captain Lambert called me out by appointment, and we walked together to Deptford, and there in his ship, the Norwich, I got him to shew me every hole and corner of the ship, much to my information, and the purpose of my going. So home again, and at Sir W. Batten’s heard how he had been already at Sir R. Slingsby’s, as we were all invited, and I intended this night to go, and there he finds all things out of order, and no such thing done…
  • Silver city showdown

    History in the News
    31 Oct 2014 | 6:38 am
    After two men attacked a picnic train in Broken Hill on New Year's Day 1915 one of their bodies is moved to the morgue. Photo: Broken Hill City Library Gool Mahomed sold ice-cream around Broken Hill, so few took notice when the picnic train approached the two turbaned men beside his ice-cream cart flying a strange little red flag with a crescent and star.
  • Scientists Say Proof Of Jack The Ripper's Identity Is Fatally Flawed

    Breaking News
    31 Oct 2014 | 6:33 am
    Who was Jack the Ripper?
  • 7 Famous Presidential Pardons

    American Presidents Blog
    M
    8 Oct 2014 | 12:34 pm
    One of the powers of the American President is the ability to pardon anyone of any crime for almost any reason. Section Two, Clause on of the Constitution notes, "The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the…
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    History in the Headlines

  • The Last American Vampire

    Christopher Klein
    31 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    Credit: La_Corivo/iStockphotos.com Edwin Brown was wasting away. For the better part of two years, he grew increasingly thin and weak. As tuberculosis ravaged the once-strapping young man in March 1892, Edwin struggled to breathe as he continually coughed up blood. He had sought a cure in the rarified air and mineral waters of Colorado Springs, Colorado, but the 18-month trip offered no healing powers and only left him homesick for a small town in America’s tiniest state. Edwin Brown returned home to Exeter, Rhode Island, where his father tilled the soil as a Yankee farmer. George Brown had…
  • The “Rumble in the Jungle,” 40 Years Ago

    Christopher Klein
    30 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    Credit: Neil Leifer/Sports Illustrated/Getty Images Although hours still remained before the sun would dawn over the Congo River, none of the 60,000 fans packed inside the enormous stadium near its banks worried about lost sleep. Even at 4:30 a.m., an electric energy crackled through the sweltering air of Kinshasa, Zaire, as 32-year-old Muhammad Ali climbed through the ropes of a boxing ring erected in the middle of 20th of May Stadium. Ali still claimed to be “the greatest of all time,” but seven years had passed since he last held the heavyweight championship. Hard-hitting George…
  • Researchers Identify Fragment of Amelia Earhart’s Plane

    Sarah Pruitt
    29 Oct 2014 | 10:56 am
    Aluminum debris, first discovered in 1991, believed to be from Earhart's plane. (Credit: TIGHAR) After departing from Miami on June 1, 1937, Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, completed nearly 22,000 miles of their attempted circumnavigation of the globe, making stops in South America, Africa, India and Lae, New Guinea. On July 2, they took off from Lae for their next target destination, tiny Howland Island in the Pacific. The distance from Lae to Howland Island was about the same as a transcontinental flight across the United States. Somewhere during the journey over the vast…
  • 8 Things You May Not Know About Jonas Salk and the Polio Vaccine

    Christopher Klein
    28 Oct 2014 | 7:17 am
    Jonas Salk in his lab (Credit: Archive Photos/Getty Images) 1. Although polio was the most feared disease of the 20th century, it was hardly the deadliest. “Polio was never the raging epidemic portrayed in the media, not even at its height in the 1940s and 1950s,” writes David M. Oshinsky in his Pulitzer Prize winning book “Polio: An American Story.” During those decades, 10 times as many children died in accidents and three times as many succumbed to cancer. Oshinsky notes that polio inspired such fear because it struck without warning and researchers were unsure of how it spread…
  • Archaeologists Reveal City Ruled By Genghis Khan’s Heirs

    Sarah Pruitt
    27 Oct 2014 | 1:22 pm
    Archaeologists from the Saratov Regional Museum of Local Lore at the Ukek dig site. (Credit: Dmitriy Kubankin) Born in 1162 near the border between modern-day Mongolia and Siberia, Genghis Khan rose from humble origins to build the largest land empire in history. He began by uniting a host of nomadic Mongolian tribes–a total of some 1 million people–before moving on to conquer vast swathes of Central Asia and China. Though he was notorious for the countless corpses he left in his wake (in part thanks to the Mongols themselves, who promoted their vicious reputation in order to sow…
 
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    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Wednesday 30 October 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    30 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    All the morning at the office. At noon played on my Theorbo, and much pleased therewith; it is now altered with a new neck. In the afternoon Captain Lambert called me out by appointment, and we walked together to Deptford, and there in his ship, the Norwich, I got him to shew me every hole and corner of the ship, much to my information, and the purpose of my going. So home again, and at Sir W. Batten’s heard how he had been already at Sir R. Slingsby’s, as we were all invited, and I intended this night to go, and there he finds all things out of order, and no such thing done…
  • Tuesday 29 October 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    29 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    This day I put on my half cloth black stockings and my new coat of the fashion, which pleases me well, and with my beaver I was (after office was done) ready to go to my Lord Mayor’s feast, as we are all invited; but the Sir Williams were both loth to go, because of the crowd, and so none of us went, and I staid and dined with them, and so home, and in evening, by consent, we met at the Dolphin, where other company came to us, and should have been merry, but their wine was so naught, and all other things out of order, that we were not so, but staid long at night, and so home and to bed.
  • Monday 28 October 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    28 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    At the office all the morning, and dined at home, and so to Paul’s Churchyard to Hunt’s, and there found my Theorbo done, which pleases me very well, and costs me 26s. to the altering. But now he tells me it is as good a lute as any is in England, and is worth well 10l. Hither I sent for Captain Ferrers to me, who comes with a friend of his, and they and I to the Theatre, and there saw “Argalus and Parthenia,” where a woman acted Parthenia, and came afterwards on the stage in men’s clothes, and had the best legs that ever I saw, and I was very well pleased with…
  • Sunday 27 October 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    27 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    (Lord’s day). At church in the morning; where in the pew both Sir Williams and I had much talk about the death of Sir Robert, which troubles me much; and them in appearance, though I do not believe it; because I know that he was a cheque to their engrossing the whole trade of the Navy office. Home to dinner, and in the afternoon to church again, my wife with me, whose mourning is now grown so old that I am ashamed to go to church with her. And after church to see my uncle and aunt Wight, and there staid and talked and supped with them, and were merry as we could be in their company.
  • Saturday 26 October 1661

    Samuel Pepys
    26 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    This morning Sir W. Pen and I should have gone out of town with my Lady Batten, to have met Sir William coming back from Portsmouth; at Kingston, but could not, by reason that my Lord of Peterborough (who is to go Governor of Tangier) came this morning, with Sir G. Carteret, to advise with us about completing of the affairs and preparacions for that place. So at the office all the morning, and in the afternoon Sir W. Pen, my wife and I to the Theatre, and there saw “The Country Captain,” the first time it hath been acted this twenty-five years, a play of my Lord Newcastle’s,…
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    History in the News

  • Silver city showdown

    31 Oct 2014 | 6:38 am
    After two men attacked a picnic train in Broken Hill on New Year's Day 1915 one of their bodies is moved to the morgue. Photo: Broken Hill City Library Gool Mahomed sold ice-cream around Broken Hill, so few took notice when the picnic train approached the two turbaned men beside his ice-cream cart flying a strange little red flag with a crescent and star.
  • Britain honours Indian soldiers' contribution in WWI

    31 Oct 2014 | 2:44 am
    Britain Thursday honoured the over a million Indian soldiers who fought in World War I, as British Defence Secretary Michael Fallon laid a wreath at the war memorial at India Gate and praised the "enormous contribution" of India. Fallon, who arrived here on a two-day visit, handed over a digitised version of the war diaries and memorials of six Victoria Crosses won by Indian soldiers to Defence Minister Arun Jaitley at a special function at the British High Commission.
  • Bill Clinton stumps for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:00 pm
    The former president and the Democratic governor are scheduled to appear together late Thursday afternoon at the Manhattan headquarters of the United Healthcare Workers East union. The two politicians have a history going back decades, when Cuomo joined the Clinton administration as assistant secretary for Community Planning and Development in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
  • Turkey's Treachery Belies Logic of Membership In the NATO Alliance

    30 Oct 2014 | 6:22 am
    The time must have come to consider whether it is really acceptable to retain Turkey as a member of NATO. At various times in the history of its membership, dating back to 1952, Turkey, though effectively rescued from threats from Stalin by the Truman administration in 1947 and 1948, was a double agent between the Soviet Union and the United States, taking substantial aid from both.
  • Theeb hanging out in the Jordanian desert (Photos courtesy of ADFF).

    30 Oct 2014 | 2:38 am
    It is 1916 in the province of Hijaz. Though on the southern periphery of the Ottoman Empire, the territory, and the pilgrimage cities of Mecca and Medina in particular, is central to the sultan's legitimacy.
 
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    American Presidents Blog

  • 7 Famous Presidential Pardons

    M
    8 Oct 2014 | 12:34 pm
    One of the powers of the American President is the ability to pardon anyone of any crime for almost any reason. Section Two, Clause on of the Constitution notes, "The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the…
  • McKinley Shot!

    M
    11 Sep 2014 | 11:33 am
    The sad news of the McKinley assassination from the the Evening Star (Washington D.C.) on September 6, 1901.
  • John Quincy Adams, Executive Order of July 11, 1826

    M
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:43 am
    Most are aware that Thomas Jefferson and John Adams died on the same day (July 4th) in 1826. Needless to say, this coincidence on Independence Day got a lot of attention at the time. There were public honors from the military for both men.John Quincy Adams Administration issued an Executive Order on July 11, 1826 to elaborate on this.It noted, "A coincidence of circumstances so wonderful gives confidence to the belief that the patriotic efforts of these illustrious men were Heaven directed, and furnishes a new seal to the hope that the prosperity of these States is under the special…
  • Lincoln's Tomb in Springfield, IL

    M
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:12 pm
    I had the privilege of visiting Springfield, IL last week. I was able to stop by Lincoln's Tomb. It is a beautiful structure. Abraham Lincoln, his wife, and two of his sons are buried here. Thought I would share a picture of the tombstone.
  • US Presidents: Lists and Records

    M
    30 Jul 2014 | 12:34 pm
    I found an interesting Presidential website titled US Presidents: Lists and Records. The site describes itself as, "The presidents of the United States are so much fun. Understanding them helps us understand American history. We have compiled a series of lists about the presidents, and will be adding more as we think of new categories." Included are very useful items such as the 1995 historical ranking of 41 presidents conducted from Siena College, which Presidents were left-handed, the relative share of popular and Electoral College vote each president won, and regular and pocket vetoes…
 
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    History on Air

  • Revolutionizing the Historic Slot Machine

    Jason
    17 Oct 2014 | 7:01 am
    The one-armed bandit is one of those things that every casino gamer who lived around the early 1900s is familiar with. Well, actually, anyone who sees an old slot machine – whether a novice or experienced gambler – will know how to play it. After all, how much simpler could a machine get? You pull a lever, wait for the reels to stop spinning, and hope that you get matching symbols. The Liberty Bell is considered the godfather of the modern slot machines. It was created by Charles Fey, a car mechanic based in San Francisco, in 1895. It is a three-reel model that is still used in some…
  • Sinclair ZX81

    Jason
    5 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    Sinclair ZX81 I wasn’t lucky enough to own a Sinclair when I was younger.  When the Sinclair ZX81 was released on March 5, 1981, I was only two years old.  Although, my father a fellow geek did give me his old Compaq portable when I was old enough to use it.  It was released two years later in January 1983.  But enough of my childhood memories this post is about the Sinclair.  The ZX81 was originally released only in the United Kingdom in March 1981 and later came to the shores of the US as the Timex Sinclair 1000.  It was designed to be a home computer.  It was designed on the cheap…
  • USS Cyclops disappears in Bermuda Triangle

    Jason
    4 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    USS Cyclops I’m a sucker for a Bermuda Triangle story, and this one fits the bill.  On March 4, 1918 USS Navy ship Cyclops set out for Baltimore.  She was heading there most likely to make repairs as her starboard engine had a cracked cylinder and in the previous port water had been seen above the Plimsoll line, the line on the hull that marks the legal limit to which a ship sits in the water.  The Cyclops was a collier, which is a cargo ship mostly used by the Navy to haul coal.  It was launched on May 7, 1910.  Cyclops was last known to be traveling through the Bermuda Triangle when…
  • Blood and Tyrants: Chapters 17-19 *Spoilers*

    Jason
    26 Feb 2014 | 8:00 am
    Blood of Tyrants It has been a terribly long time since I posted any of my updates for this book.  Here is what happened.  First about 6 months ago my wife gave birth to a beautiful little girl named Emily.  Anyone who has a newborn knows that this means your personal times goes to zero.  And that is exactly what happened to me.  While I still had time to do a blog post here and there, I didn’t have time to read and highlight as I went through Blood of Tyrants by Logan Beirne.  When a little free time did crop up I realized that while I was enjoy this books content, I wasn’t…
  • RIP Maria Von Trapp

    Jason
    25 Feb 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Von Trapp Family Maria Von Trapp was from the musical family whose escape from Nazi-occupied Austria was the basis for The Sound of Music.  She died at the age of 99 in her home in Vermont.  She was the last surviving member of the seven original Trapp Family Singers.  Maria was portrayed as Louisa in the film and musical.  She was the 3rd child and 2nd oldest daughter of Austrian Naval Capt. Georg von Trapp and his first wife, Agathe Whitehead von Trapp.  “The Sound of Music” was based loosely on a 1949 book by von Trapp’s second wife, also Maria von Trapp, who died in…
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    History Net: Where History Comes Alive - World & US History Online

  • Daily Quiz for October 31, 2014

    HistoryNet Staff
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:01 pm
    In 1817 Don Francisco de Paula Marin made one of the earliest attempts - perhaps the first - to grow this crop in Hawaii.
  • Military History - January 2015 - Table of Contents

    David Lauterborn
    30 Oct 2014 | 11:06 am
    The January 2015 issue of Military History features articles about how NATO beat the Warsaw Pact in the Cold War, the bitter and bloody 1675–78 King Philip's War in New England, the centuries-long clash between the imperial Romans and tribal Celts, Frederick Funston's bold 1901 raid that ended the Philippine Insurrection, and a look at the strange but true 1914 Christmas Truce on the Western Frontier.
  • Military History Reader Poll - January 2015

    David Lauterborn
    30 Oct 2014 | 10:58 am
    In hindsight, did the Republic of the Philippines develop due to the American intervention and longtime occupation or in spite of those actions?…
  • 42cm M-Gerät Howitzer: The Original Big Bertha

    David Lauterborn
    30 Oct 2014 | 10:28 am
    The lumbering German 42cm M-Gerät howitzer was designed to reduce the stout Allied defensive fortresses along the Western Front, a job it did effectively despite its limited mobility.
  • Interview With Imperial War Museum Director-General Diane Lees

    David Lauterborn
    30 Oct 2014 | 9:48 am
    Imperial War Museum Director-General Diane Lees discusses the museum's revamped atrium and galleries and its ongoing activities tied to the World War I centennial.
 
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    african american history - Google News

  • Teach Kids About African American Culture: 5 Educational Activities in NYC - Eurweb.com

    31 Oct 2014 | 4:14 am
    Eurweb.comTeach Kids About African American Culture: 5 Educational Activities in NYCEurweb.comThe Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is located inside the New York Public Library in Harlem, New York. This institution and research library represents African American, African Diaspora and African experiences, history and culture.
  • Hong Kong Politician Likens Protesters to African-American Slaves - New York Times (blog)

    31 Oct 2014 | 1:27 am
    New York Times (blog)Hong Kong Politician Likens Protesters to African-American SlavesNew York Times (blog)“Furthermore, we're puzzled by her lack of understanding of American history, and why she failed to understand that the full ratification of the 15th Amendment in 1870 already granted full emancipation to African-American slaves, including full voting An HSBC director just likened Hong Kong's citizens to slavesQuartzall 36 news articles »
  • African American History will soon complete the National Mall - Lasentinel

    30 Oct 2014 | 7:32 pm
    African American History will soon complete the National MallLasentinelTown Hall Los Angeles hosted a topic discussion on Oct. 22 about the impact of Black California shaping America and museums with founding director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Lonnie G. Bunch III and NPR ...
  • Little known African American history facts: 'The Kissing Case of 1958' - Examiner.com

    29 Oct 2014 | 10:13 pm
    Examiner.comLittle known African American history facts: 'The Kissing Case of 1958'Examiner.comAlthough many Black Americans know reparations are without a doubt owed to them and their ancestors, most understand it can likely never happen in the form of fair and equitable reparations for 246 years of slavery and ongoing pain and suffering there ...Ta-Nehisi Coates on White Supremacy and a Life of StruggleThe Rootall 3 news articles »
  • “The Pictorial History of the African American Athlete” Sets the Record Straight - The Hilltop Online

    29 Oct 2014 | 2:07 pm
    “The Pictorial History of the African American Athlete” Sets the Record StraightThe Hilltop OnlineAlthough the forefathers who helped pave the way for today's black superstars are largely unknown to the general public, “The Pictorial History of the African American Athlete” by Francis C. Harris and Charles F. Harris Jr. will provide unprecedented
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    History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

  • October 31, 1517: Martin Luther posts 95 theses

    30 Oct 2014 | 9:00 pm
    On this day in 1517, the priest and scholar Martin Luther approaches the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, and nails a piece of paper to it containing the 95 revolutionary opinions that would begin the Protestant Reformation. In his theses, Luther condemned the excesses and corruption of the Roman Catholic Church, especially the papal practice of asking payment—called "indulgences"—for the forgiveness of sins. At the time, a Dominican priest named Johann Tetzel, commissioned by the Archbishop of Mainz and Pope Leo X, was in the midst of a major fundraising campaign…
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    The New York History Blog

  • This Week’s Top New York History News

    Editorial Staff
    31 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Subscribe! More than 7,500 people follow The New York History Blog via E-mail, RSS, or Twitter or Facebook updates. Make a Contribution! The New York History Blog is supported by you. If you think this site provides a valuable service, please become a recurring contributor – or just make a one-time contribution at our Rally.org […]
  • In Haverstraw, The House That Inspired Hitchcock

    Bill Batson
    30 Oct 2014 | 12:00 pm
    The building in my sketch at left, located in Haverstraw NY and the subject of Edward Hopper’s 1925 painting, House by the Railroad, maintains its vigil on Route 9W. Hopper’s haunting depiction of the three-story house came to the attention of the cast and crew of Alfred Hitchcock’s movie classic, Psycho. The painting inspired not only […]
  • Glens Falls Lecture: Champion Bicycle Rider Harry Elkes

    Editorial Staff
    30 Oct 2014 | 10:30 am
    On Thursday, November 6 at 7 pm, John Strough will speak at the Chapman Museum in Glens Falls NY, about the short but fascinating career of local bicycle racer, Harry Elkes, who achieved great fame but died tragically at a young age.  The program is free and open to the public. Born in Port Henry […]
  • Thomas Cole Exhibition, Lecture At Albany Institute

    Editorial Staff
    30 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    The Albany Institute of History & Art has announced that it will install a special exhibition of Thomas Cole materials to coincide with Dr. Paul Schweizer’s lecture and book signing at the Albany Institute on Sunday, November 2, 2014, at 2 pm. Dr. Schweizer is Director Emeritus of the Munson-Williams-Proctor Art Institute’s Museum of Art […]
  • The State Historian on NYS History Month 2014

    Robert Weible
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:00 pm
    It’s been a very good year for history in New York. The state’s historians, archivists, educators, preservationists, and curators have, over the course of the past twelve months, coordinated their efforts and raised public awareness of New York’s history as never before. And now, as November approaches, it’s clear that History Month is going to […]
 
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    Toptenz.net

  • Top 10 Creepiest Alien Abductions

    Mike Brown
    30 Oct 2014 | 9:10 pm
    Alien abduction stories have been around for a long time and range from mildly peculiar to the downright disturbing and disgusting.  The Internet has given believers a forum to share their stories and encounters of the unknown.  Though some might be a figment of their imagination or an unadulterated lie, stories like this have been […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post Top 10 Creepiest Alien Abductions appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • The Creepiest Videos on Youtube, Part 2!

    JCU Paranormal Research Group
    30 Oct 2014 | 9:01 pm
    A Brief History On October 31st, we celebrate Halloween around the world!  On honor of the holiday most popularly associated with almost all things creepy, we list some of the creepiest videos found on YouTube!  Yesterday, we listed videos concerning various urban legends.  Today, we feature various short films made by talented directors without anyContinue reading... The post The Creepiest Videos on Youtube, Part 2! appeared first on Cracked History.   Source: Toptenz.net The post The Creepiest Videos on Youtube, Part 2! appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • How The U.S. Lost Viet Nam: The October Surprise

    Daniel Zarzeczny
    30 Oct 2014 | 9:01 pm
      A Brief History On October 31, 1968, in a political move intended to help Hubert Humphrey win the Presidential election, President Lyndon Johnson made an announcement that became known as “The October Surprise,” in which he stated that all bombardment of North Viet Nam would be halted.  The reason publicly given for this halt was that NorthContinue reading... The post How The U.S. Lost Viet Nam: The October Surprise appeared first on Cracked History.   Source: Toptenz.net The post How The U.S. Lost Viet Nam: The October Surprise appeared first on…
  • This is Why The Alien From “Alien” Doesn’t Have Eyes

    Karl Smallwood
    30 Oct 2014 | 7:29 pm
    Alien is considered by many to be one of the scariest movies ever made thanks mostly to the eponymous alien that spends half The post This is Why The Alien From “Alien” Doesn’t Have Eyes appeared first on Fact Fiend.   Source: Toptenz.net The post This is Why The Alien From “Alien” Doesn’t Have Eyes appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 People Who Rose From The Dead

    Paul Jongko
    29 Oct 2014 | 9:10 pm
    Every now and then you see a story in the news about someone who’s miraculously come back to life. Maybe it’s a miracle, or maybe it’s just bad medicine — read these amazing tales and judge for yourself. 10. MaNdlo “MaNdlo” is a prostitute from Zimbabwe who reportedly collapsed and died while having a wild […]   Source: Toptenz.net The post 10 People Who Rose From The Dead appeared first on Toptenz.net.
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    History Of Macedonia

  • ΥΠΠΟΑ: Συνέχιση ανασκαφικών εργασιών στην Αμφίπολη

    Stern
    31 Oct 2014 | 5:12 am
    Οι προγραμματισμένες ανασκαφικές και στερεωτικές εργασίες από την Εφορεία Αρχαιοτήτων Σερρών στο λόφο Καστά Αμφίπολης συνεχίζονται ως εξής: 1.Προχωρεί η απομάκρυνση χωμάτων από τον τέταρτο χώρο και αποκαλύφθηκε η θεμελίωση των πλαϊνών τοίχων. Η έδραση των τοίχων γίνεται επί τεχνητής επίχωσης, από καλά συμπυκνωμένο…
  • ΥΠΠΟΑ: Συνέχιση ανασκαφικών εργασιών στην Αμφίπολη

    Stern
    28 Oct 2014 | 8:57 am
    1. Το Υπουργείο Πολιτισμού, δίνει στη δημοσιότητα, για πρώτη φορά, υλικό- χρόνος, 2´.10’’- από την αποκάλυψη του ψηφιδωτού,στο ταφικό μνημείο της Αμφίπολης. Είναι, ουσιαστικά, υλικό αμοντάριστο, σε συνοχή τα πλάνα, με φυσικούς ήχους, αφαιρώντας τις πολλές ώρες της ενδιάμεσης ανασκαφικής διαδικασίας. Όπως αντιλαμβάνεστε, η…
  • Θεσσαλονίκη : «Τρόπαιο Εθνικής Επετείου 28ης Οκτωβρίου 1940»

    Stern
    28 Oct 2014 | 1:20 am
    Την Δευτέρα 27 Οκτωβρίου 2014 πραγματοποιήθηκε η τελετή λήξης της εκδήλωσης «Τρόπαιο Εθνικής Επετείου 28ης Οκτωβρίου 1940», στην προβλήτα 1 του Οργανισμού Λιμένος Θεσσαλονίκης, στο πλαίσιο των επετειακών εκδηλώσεων για την 28η Οκτωβρίου, παρουσία του Αρχηγού ΓΕΕΘΑ, Στρατηγού Μιχαήλ Κωσταράκου. Η εκδήλωση «Τρόπαιο Εθνικής Επετείου…
  • ΥΠΠΟΑ: Συνέχιση ανασκαφικών εργασιών στην Αμφίπολη

    Stern
    21 Oct 2014 | 10:55 am
    Συνεχίζονται οι ανασκαφικές εργασίες από την ΚΗ Εφορεία Προϊστορικών και Κλασικών Αρχαιοτήτων, στον Τύμβο Καστά, Αμφίπολης. Το Σάββατο (18/10) και τη Δευτέρα (20/10) προχώρησε η ανασκαφή σε όλη την επιφάνεια στο εσωτερικό του τέταρτου χώρου (4,5Χ6μ.) και σε βάθος μέχρι 5,20 μ. από την κορυφή της θόλου. Σήμερα, πραγματοποιήθηκε…
  • Η Αμφίπολις, η Σόφια και οι.. Θράκες!

    Stern
    20 Oct 2014 | 2:31 am
      Καθώς, το αρχαιολογικό και ιστορικό ενδιαφέρον είναι στραμμένο στην Αμφίπολη, στον ευρύτερο αρχαιολογικό και ιστορικό ορίζοντας γίνονται πράγματα, για τα οποία οι Έλληνες επιστήμονες ελάχιστα ενδιαφέρονται να παρέμβουν και να παρατάξουν τα τυχόν επιχειρήματά τους. Αφορμή για το σχόλιο έδωσε η πρόσφατη εκπομπή του BBC για…
 
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    Claire Gebben

  • Mysterious forces at work

    clairegebben
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:30 pm
    Many wonderful things occurred during my recent visit to Germany. For instance, this interview published in Die Rheinpfalz newspaper. Look, Mom, I speak perfect German! (not) The interviewer spoke English, naturally. She recorded our talk, then translated it into German. The photo she used was taken in the market square in the heart of the old town of Freinsheim. We sat on a bench just to the right for the interview. Still in Freinsheim a week later, I gave a book presentation on The Last of the Blacksmiths at the Altes Spital Cultural Center in Freinsheim to a full house — about 60…
  • Historic Frankfurt

    clairegebben
    14 Oct 2014 | 2:34 pm
    Early last Saturday, when in Frankfurt, Germany, my very kind host Mia asked me what I wanted to see. The Saturday market? The older, historic part of town? It had been a long week, and quite frankly, my brain wasn’t firing on all cylinders. It was my last day there. I’d just spent three days and very long hours browsing the huge, international Frankfurt Book Fair. Foremost in my mind now was locating the airport in time for my departure flight the next morning. So I shrugged. “Anything’s fine, whatever you think.” Mia hesitated, then suggested we visit the…
  • Roman ruins, grape harvest, and the devil’s stone

    clairegebben
    7 Oct 2014 | 5:19 am
    Freinsheim may be a small rural town, but during my visit there’s been so much going on I have trouble keeping up. Friday, Oct. 3 was German Unification Day (a celebration of the day East and West Germany re-united in 1989). It is a national holiday. My relatives all gathered in a terraced garden in the vineyard, in the shade around a massive stone table. Afterwards, we hiked to some Roman ruins — two of four sarcophagi discovered a few years ago in the fields, dating back to around 300 A.D. Unification Day brunch in the wine garden on the Musikantenbuckel Roman sarcophagi from…
  • Odd sights to a foreigner

    clairegebben
    3 Oct 2014 | 1:19 am
    St. Lubentiuskirche in the south of Limburg Spaghetti Ice Cream with chocolate and nuts (it has whipped cream in the center) Inscribed locks on a gate by the Lahn — a custom of lovers A guinea pig farm in Roedinghausen They smoke more often here — maybe it’s the cigarette machines. The post Odd sights to a foreigner appeared first on Claire Gebben.
  • The Nonnenstein and other tales

    clairegebben
    30 Sep 2014 | 1:03 pm
    I’ve been thinking a lot today about my other German great-great grandfather Henry F. Hoppensack, born April 29, 1821. He wrote in his autobiography about his formative years growing up in Nordrhein-Westfalen. Clearly, he never forgot how hard he had to work on behalf of his father on the Estate Kilver. In an abrupt manner, not unlike Henry Hoppensack, I decided to go to Rödinghausen today. I had a few extra days and a five day Eurail pass, so why not? Why not go to the area of the Estate Kilver, try to track down a thing or two about Henry Hoppensack and his wife Ilsabein…
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    Ancient Origins

  • Have archaeologists found the last known witch grave in Scotland?

    aprilholloway
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:54 pm
    Archaeologists in Scotland believe that they have located the final resting place of Lilias Adie, who was accused of being a witch and, following her death in prison, was buried in deep mud with a heavy flat stone placed on top of her – a tradition based on the belief that witches could rise from their graves unless held down by a heavy stone. The Valleyfield Community Centre based in Fife, Scotland, recounts the story of the Lilias:Read moreSection: NewsGeneral
  • Crossing the Veil: The Pre-Christian Origins of Halloween and Samhain

    lizleafloor
    30 Oct 2014 | 2:46 pm
    Halloween, or the ancient Samhain, is considered the time of year when the veil between our world and the spirit world is at its thinnest. As darkness falls and families light their pumpkin Jack-o'-lanterns, they are, perhaps unknowingly, repeating the ancient traditions of honoring the dead and marking the beginning of the ‘dark half’ of the year. Halloween is an annual celebration held largely in the western world on October 31st. Starting in the evening, children, and sometimes adults, dress in masks and costumes, traditionally as ghostly figures, witches, or the undead – vampires,…
  • Bulgarian farmer discovers skull resembling werewolf in a sealed box

    aprilholloway
    30 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    A Bulgarian born farmer, Trayche Draganov, claims to have found a box, chained shut, containing a werewolf-like skull while ploughing a new section of field in the village of Novo Selo, Republic of Macedonia. The account was reported to Ancient Origins by historian Filip Ganev, who spent time in Novo Selo while conducting research for his book on the Balkan Wars. Mr Ganev met the farmer, who showed him the box containing the unusual skull. He reported that the skull appears wolf-like with the exception of an enlarged cranium, a trait found only in primate species. Mr Ganev photographed the…
  • Ancient tunnel under Teotihuacan may lead to Royal tombs

    aprilholloway
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:35 pm
    Mexican archaeologists have announced that a years-long exploration of an underground tunnel beneath the ancient city of Teotihuacan in Mexico has yielded thousands of artifacts and may lead to royal tombs. According to a news release on Reuters, the entrance to the 1,800-year-old tunnel was first discovered in 2003, and an extensive project involving both human researchers and remote-control robots, has been ongoing ever since. The tunnel is located approximately 18 meters below the Temple of the Feathered Serpent, the third largest pyramid at Teotihuacan, which flourished between 100 BC and…
  • Silphium, the ancient contraceptive herb driven to extinction

    Martin Clemens
    29 Oct 2014 | 3:08 pm
    As an institution of spiritual authority, the Catholic Church wields much influence over the attitudes and beliefs of millions of people around the globe.  From scriptural doctrine to less refined codes of behaviour, the Pope, of which there have been 266 over the last 2000 years, holds the power to inform the more than 1.2 billion Roman Catholics, or 2.18 billion Christians globally on the many aspects of Christian faith and behaviour expected by the church hierarchy. Of course, not everyone agrees with the teachings of the church, and in that regard there are some subjects that are, shall…
 
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    Rogues Gallery

  • “It’s The Devil’s club…I just manage it for him”

    The Rake Yesterday
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:11 am
    London 1723 I like a good orgy as well as the next fellow, but having a drop of blasphemy would really spice it up. “Prigging a Convenient” is much more exciting when she’s dressed as a nun. It’s such a shame the king outlawed our little “Hell-Fire Club.” It only lasted a year but they were great days, much more fun than clubs like The Kit Kat or The Beef Steak,  with all that political posturing. When I stopped calling myself a “Mohock” I really thought my youthful days of wild abandon would be over. Thanks to our former club president, Phillip Duke of Wharton, I…
  • If its new, different or not from this country…I HATE IT!

    The Rake Yesterday
    12 Oct 2014 | 9:17 am
    1852 Sir - As a proud Englishman – who despairs of the depraved cess pit of moral filth into which this once great country has become immersed  – may I use the pages of your august ( if somewhat “Liberal” ) newspaper to extol the virtues of the one gentleman who, alone, stands between Albion and the blackest pits of hell. Colonel Charles de Laet Waldo Sibthorp MP. I heartily agree with this visionary man when he says that foreigners should be distrusted, science and “Progress” is ruining this country and the world was a far, far better place in the halcyon days of our golden…
  • “Did You Just Spill My Pint?!”

    The Rake Yesterday
    2 Oct 2014 | 8:40 am
    London 1712 Its 6 am, welcome to a glorious November morning here in London’s Hyde Park for what promises to be a truly honourable meeting of two gentlemen, settling their differences in a respectable way. ….By dueling. To my left is James Douglas, 4th Duke of Hamilton , Peer of Scotland and “Master of the Great Wardrobe” accompanied by his “Second”,  Colonel John Hamilton. For those of you not familiar with dueling  (perhaps you work on a farm) “A Second” is a close friend of each combatant who makes sure the duel is fair and honourable and who can also cross swords…
  • Hey Hey We’re The Mohocks!

    The Rake Yesterday
    11 Sep 2014 | 2:39 pm
    LONDON 1712 I don’t know what the youth of this country are coming to, I really don’t. The respectable classes can no longer set foot outside their homes after dusk without fear of molestation – and worse – from gangs of lustful, drink addled cutthroats whom Satan himself would spurn. Or so the pamphleteers say. They call themselves “Mohocks” – after a cannibal tribe in India – and all genteel London trembles with terror at news of their outrages. “Read all about it”   I have fallen into a swoon myself several times since Monday. It’s all in the pages of…
  • The Regency Keith Moon – Drunken Horseplay with “Mad” Jack Mytton

    The Rake Yesterday
    25 Jun 2014 | 6:24 am
    Calais 1832 What kind of maniac tries to cure an attack of the hiccups by setting himself on fire? The answer is lying in a pain and brandy induced swoon with half his body the colour of “ a newly singed bacon-hog.” As he deliriously points out however, his hiccups have disappeared.   John Mytton’s remedies for life’s little inconveniences are nothing if not suicidally excessive. Which is probably why even his closet friends refer to him as “Mad” Jack. The poor fellow’s only 37 but he looks one hundred years older. A lifetime of biblical boozing, unfettered extravagance…
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    DisputedPast

  • Mosaic of Persephone discovered in ancient tomb

    Jan Huisman
    17 Oct 2014 | 4:25 am
    A stunning mosaic of Persephone is discovered at the site of the newly excavated Amphipolis tomb. Earlier this week (DisputedPast reported) images from the other part of the mosaic were released by the Greek ministry of Culture. The mosaic is now fully uncovered and it can be interpret as a whole.... Read full history →
  • Aegean civilization ended 100 years earlier as presumed

    Jan Huisman
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:51 am
    Conventional estimates for the collapse of the Aegean civilization are around 1025 BC. Recent radiocarbon analyses of artifacts and plants suggests that the Greek Bronze Age probably ended 100 years earlier.  The traditional dating was entirely based on historical dates, derived from Egypt and the Near East. These written records... Read full history →
  • Celtic chariot (300 BC) discovered near Leicestershire

    Jan Huisman
    15 Oct 2014 | 3:38 am
    Archaeologists from the University of Leicester dug up the remains of a decorated Iron Age chariot. The Celtic vehicle, dating from the 2nd or 3rd century BC, seems to have been buried as a religious offering. Archaeologists found the remains during their ongoing excavation of the Burrough Hill Iron Age hillfort,... Read full history →
  • Beautiful tomb from Alexander’s age revealed

    Jan Huisman
    13 Oct 2014 | 6:13 am
      The discovery of an ancient tomb near Amphipolis in the Northern part of Greece earlier this year made the headlines worldwide (DisputedPast reported). The Greek prime minister himself underlined the importance of the finding to the press. He didn’t exaggerate, as the splendour of the tomb hints at a royal purpose of this burial... Read full history →
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    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • Ghosts in the Ancient World

    30 Oct 2014 | 11:47 am
    To the people of the ancient world, there was no doubt that the soul of a human being survived bodily death. Whatever an individual's personal views were on the subject, culturally they were brought up with the understanding that the dead lived on in another form that still required some kind of sustenance, in an afterlife that was largely dictated by several factors: the kind of life they had lived...
  • An Ancient Ghost Story: Philinnion and Machates

    30 Oct 2014 | 9:39 am
    Ghost stories have existed for thousands of years, often in similar forms and frequently dealing with the same themes, in many of the most ancient cultures. The writer H.P. Lovecraft once wrote, "As may naturally be expected of a form so closely connected with primal emotion, the horror-tale is as old as human thought and speech themselves." The human desire to defeat death, to live forever...
  • Ireland's Exquisite Insular Art

    30 Oct 2014 | 6:41 am
    The Book of Kells completed in Ireland, c. 800 CE. This folio shows the lavishly decorated text that opens the Gospel of John. While much of Europe was consumed by social disarray in the centuries following the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in 476 CE, a remarkable golden age of scholasticism and artistic achievement began in Ireland. Untouched by centuries of Roman rule, Ireland retained...
  • Visiting the Burrell Collection in Glasgow

    29 Oct 2014 | 5:49 am
    One day before my fellowship admission ceremony at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, I was sitting in my room and surfing the net. I found that a museum in Glasgow, the Burrell Collection, houses some artifacts from Mesopotamia. Thats great! I hired a taxi and went there. I arrived at 10:30 AM. It lies within Pollok Country Park, about 5 kilometers south of the Glasgow city center...
  • Greek Colonization

    27 Oct 2014 | 6:17 pm
    In the first half of the first millennium BCE, Greek city-states, most of which were maritime powers, began to look beyond Greece for land and resources, and so they founded colonies across the Mediterranean. Trade contacts were usually the first steps in the colonization process and then, later, once local populations were subdued or included within the colony, cities were established. These could...
 
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    AncientHistoryLists » AncientHistoryLists

  • Top 10 biggest events of 2nd Punic war

    Saugat Adhikari
    26 Oct 2014 | 9:08 pm
    Ancient Rome and Carthage had a long history of conflicts that lasted for more than a century. All this tension culminated in a series of three wars fought between the two states from 264 BC to 146 BC. These wars were called the Punic wars. The second Punic war was fought from 218 BC to 201 BC and is most remembered for the huge battles fought between the Carthaginians under Hannibal and the Romans under different generals. Even though Hannibal’s army invaded Italy from the north and resoundingly defeated the Roman army in several battles, he could never achieve the ultimate goal of causing…
  • Top 10 inventions and discoveries of ancient Greece that are remarkably used today

    Saugat Adhikari
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:03 am
    The ancient Greece has a number of inventions and discoveries attributed to them. Even though, the fact remains, most of their discoveries were corrected in subsequent generations. Their findings in the area of astronomy, geography and mathematics, pioneered the age of science. The Greek interest in scientific specification of physical world can be seen as further back in the history in the 6th century BC. The invention and discoveries in the ancient Greece were pioneered in the versatile area. Being, the father of science, or the father of medicine, or the father of zoology, and several…
  • Top 10 greatest emperors of Ancient Rome

    Saugat Adhikari
    28 Sep 2014 | 9:30 pm
    The Roman emperor was the designated ruler of Roman empire that started after the end of Roman kingdom in the archaic period. The legitimacy of an emperor’s rule depended on his control of the army and recognition by the Senate; an emperor would normally be proclaimed by his troops, or invested with imperial titles by the Senate, or both. But the Roman people regarded their emperors as equivalent of kings, even though the very first emperor Augustus the great himself absolutely refused to be taken as a monarch. The age of Roman Republic effectively ended with the death of Julius Caesar…
  • 7 Homo species close to present human that existed on the Earth.

    Saugat Adhikari
    23 Sep 2014 | 10:17 pm
    The Earth has  4.6 billion years history. However, Archaic Home Sapiens(Modern Human had evolved around between 400,000 and 250,000 years ago. Human evolved from the family Hominid(great apes), that existed in the earth around 20 million years ago. Unlike today there were different human species that existed on the earth. The characteristics between these human species are however different.  Not all specifies of human survive through the journey, many of them extinct. The only species left in the human race is our ancestors. The possibility of human linking to the apes came after…
  • 10 oldest Ancient civilizations ever existed

    Saugat Adhikari
    10 Sep 2014 | 7:08 pm
    In the course of human evolution, at a certain point in time, the idea of living in a group with mutual understanding and dependency became a very useful and practical lifestyle. From such small isolated groups, communities were formed. Then came the societies which in due time became a civilization. How the human mentality and psychology led to this huge change is still a popular topic among the historians and anthropologist, and a major discussion for another day. For now, let’s talk about some of the oldest civilizations to have ever existed in the world. We are talking about the…
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    History Now!

  • 20 Amazing Historical Pictures

    23 Oct 2014 | 12:39 pm
    1) Sakurajima eruption (1914). 2) Children in Germany during World War 2.3) Tank graveyard in Kuwait.4) Massive logging operation, Michigan (1800s).5) Paratroopers of the U.S. 2nd Battalion crossing a river in Vietnam (1965).6) Test pilot George Aird ejecting from his English Electric Lightning F1 aircraft at a fantastically low altitude (1962).7) Two American soldiers pose with Easter eggs on Easter Sunday (1945).8) The German Schienenzeppelin (Rail Zeppelin) developed by Franz Kruckenberg in 1929.9) Construction of the Berlin Wall.10) The Bronx looking like something out…
  • The Battle of Crécy or how the longbow changed the World

    22 Oct 2014 | 5:16 am
    When we hear of “Super-weapons” we usually think about plasma-rifles or lightsabers. But less then 700 years ago, another type of weapon ruled the battlefields of Europe, a weapon so simple and yet so deadly. The longbow, it changed the course of history and how we think about warfare. The best example for this is the battle of Crécy.The Battle of CrécyThis battle initiated the Hundred Years' War between France and England. On the 26th August 1346 their forces stood eye to eye. The clear favourite: France and its feared Knights. Until then the unchallenged kings of the battlefields were…
  • 6 Interesting Facts about art

    22 Oct 2014 | 3:41 am
  • 20 Amazing History Pictures

    20 Oct 2014 | 5:51 am
    1) Christmas party thrown by Hitler for his Generals as well as SS officers and cadets.2) 152 mm Howitzer battery fires during Belorussian Strategic Offensive Operation (1944).3) The Statue of Liberty surrounded by scaffolding as workers complete the final stages in Paris (1885).4) Eiffel Tower during construction (1888).5) Laika the dog onboard Sputnik II (1957).6) First picture showing the curvature of the Earth.7) Commuters Reading of John F. Kennedy's Assassination.8) Headquarters of Benito Mussolini and the Italian Fascist Party (1934). 9) Bombs dropped on Kobe,…
  • In Short: Genghis Kahn

    19 Oct 2014 | 5:07 am
    The Mongolian warrior was the biggest conqueror in history. In the east his empire reached to the Japanese sea and in west to the Caspian ocean. It was the largest empire ever. His reign as the great Kahn of the mongols lasted form 1206 to 1227. He built a massive army, especially know for its superior cavalry and its feared archers. His strategy was power through alliances. The nomadic horsemen were treated generously. Genghis Khan allied with the nomadic people who in return swore to control the other conquered cities . But this rule system failed due to the assimilation of the controlling…
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