History

  • Most Topular Stories

  • A New Image of William Shakespeare Has Been Discovered, Historian Says

    Breaking News
    23 May 2015 | 8:39 am
    Mark Griffiths found the image in the 1598 The Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes written by the playwright's friend John Gerard
  • Tomb discovered of a fifth dynasty Egyptian queen

    DisputedPast
    Jan Huisman
    4 Jan 2015 | 12:55 pm
    Czech archaeologists have discovered the tomb in Egypt of an unknown queen: Chentkaus III. She was probably the wife of a pharaoh who belonged to the fifth dynasty, about 4,500 years ago, according to the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities. “It’s the first time we discover the name of the queen,... Read full history →
  • 10 Ways Self-Driving Cars Will Change the World

    Toptenz.net
    Robert Grimminck
    20 May 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Autonomous cars used to only be found in science fiction, but over the past few years a number of companies, including Google and Mercedes-Benz, have been developing cars that will drive themselves. It’s believed that the first autonomous cars will be ready for the public by the year 2025, and by the year 2040 most […] The post 10 Ways Self-Driving Cars Will Change the World appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Unbelievable Albert Einstein Facts

    The List Love » History
    The List Love
    14 May 2015 | 7:45 am
    We here at The List Love are offering 10 unbelievable Albert Einstein facts that will make your jaw drop. Many people know Einstein as the man behind EMC=2, or as one of the most influential physicists of the 20th century. There was, however, so much more to the Nobel Prize Winner, as you’re about to find out… 1. Einstein & His First Cousin image via www.tyneoconnell.com Albert Einstein once said “rejoice with your family in the beautiful land of life” – wise words from a very wise man. In fact, Albert Einstein loved to rejoice with his family so much that he…
  • Leap of Faith: A WWII Story (Video)

    History in the Headlines
    History.com Staff
    22 May 2015 | 8:38 am
    Leap of Faith: A WWII Story (Video)
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    History in the Headlines

  • Leap of Faith: A WWII Story (Video)

    History.com Staff
    22 May 2015 | 8:38 am
    Leap of Faith: A WWII Story (Video)
  • 9 Things You Should Know About the Wars of the Roses

    Evan Andrews
    22 May 2015 | 7:39 am
    Credit: Rixipix/iStockphoto.com 1. The Yorks and Lancasters were descended from the same family. The Houses of York and Lancaster both traced their lineage to the sons of Edward III of the House of Plantagenet, who ruled as England’s king from 1327 until 1377. The Yorks were descended from the female relatives of Edward’s second and fourth sons, while the Lancasters were related to Edward’s third son, John of Gaunt. This complicated family tree ensured that both factions had a legitimate case for their royal lineage, though by modern standards the Yorkists’ claim was undoubtedly…
  • The First Shots of the Texas Revolution

    Christopher Klein
    20 May 2015 | 1:08 pm
    Reproduction of the “Come and Take It" flag. (Credit: Daniel Meyer/Wikimedia Commons) Green DeWitt feared for the safety of his colony. The empresario of the DeWitt Colony had led 400 Anglo-Americans to settle in the Mexican territory of Texas near the confluence of the San Marcos and Guadalupe Rivers in 1825, but since then the capital of his colony, Gonzales, had been struck repeatedly by Comanche raids and other Native American attacks. Green DeWitt At DeWitt’s request, the Mexican government in 1831 provided Gonzales with a small 6-pound cannon to defend the outpost. By September…
  • Did North Carolina Issue the First Declaration of Independence?

    Evan Andrews
    20 May 2015 | 10:21 am
    North Carolina state flag, featuring the May 20, 1775 date of the supposed signing of the Mecklenburg Declaration. (Credit: Getty Images) In April 1819, a provocative article appeared in the pages of the Raleigh Register newspaper in North Carolina. “It is probably not known to many of our readers that the citizens of Mecklenburg County, in this State, made a Declaration of Independence more than a year before Congress made theirs,” it read. “The following Document on the subject has lately come to the hands of the Editor from unquestionable authority, and it is published that it may go…
  • Remembering New England’s “Dark Day”

    Evan Andrews
    19 May 2015 | 4:00 am
    Credit: Lighthousebay/Getty Images For several days before May 19, people had noticed unusual activity in the skies over New England. The region had only recently emerged from one of the most bitterly cold winters on record, and while the air was now warmer, it was also thick and heavy. The sun had taken on a reddish hue in the hours surrounding dusk and dawn, and the moon had begun to glow pink at night. General George Washington, who was encamped with his Continental Army in nearby New Jersey, commented on the strange weather in a May 18 diary entry. “Heavy and uncommon kind of clouds,”…
 
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    The Diary of Samuel Pepys

  • Thursday 22 May 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    22 May 2015 | 5:59 pm
    This morning comes an order from the Secretary of State, Nicholas, for me to let one Mr. Lee, a Councellor, to view what papers I have relating to passages of the late times, wherein Sir H. Vane’s hand is employed, in order to the drawing up his charge; which I did, and at noon he, with Sir W. Pen and his daughter, dined with me, and he to his work again, and we by coach to the Theatre and saw “Love in a Maze.” The play hath little in it but Lacy’s part of a country fellow, which he did to admiration. So home, and supped with Sir W. Pen, where Sir W. Batten and Captn.
  • Wednesday 21 May 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    21 May 2015 | 5:59 pm
    My wife and I by water to Westminster, and after she had seen her father (of whom lately I have heard nothing at all what he does or her mother), she comes to me to my Lord’s lodgings, where she and I staid walking in White Hall garden. And in the Privy-garden saw the finest smocks and linnen petticoats of my Lady Castlemaine’s, laced with rich lace at the bottom, that ever I saw; and did me good to look upon them. So to Wilkinson’s, she and I and Sarah to dinner, where I had a good quarter of lamb and a salat. Here Sarah told me how the King dined at my Lady…
  • Tuesday 20 May 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    20 May 2015 | 5:59 pm
    Sir W. Pen and I did a little business at the office, and so home again. Then comes Dean Fuller after we had dined, but I got something for him, and very merry we were for an hour or two, and I am most pleased with his company and goodness. At last parted, and my wife and I by coach to the Opera, and there saw the 2nd part of “The Siege of Rhodes,” but it is not so well done as when Roxalana was there, who, it is said, is now owned by my Lord of Oxford.1 Thence to Tower-wharf, and there took boat, and we all walked to Halfeway House, and there eat and drank, and were pleasant, and…
  • Monday 19 May 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    19 May 2015 | 5:59 pm
    Long in bed, sometimes scolding with my wife, and then pleased again, and at last up, and put on my riding cloth suit, and a camelott coat new, which pleases me well enough. To the Temple about my replication, and so to my brother Tom’s, and there hear that my father will be in town this week. So home, the shops being but some shut and some open. I hear that the House of Commons do think much that they should be forced to huddle over business this morning against the afternoon, for the King to pass their Acts, that he may go out of town.1 But he, I hear since, was forced to stay till…
  • Sunday 18 May 1662

    Samuel Pepys
    18 May 2015 | 5:59 pm
    (Whitsunday). By water to White Hall, and there to chappell in my pew belonging to me as Clerk of the Privy Seal; and there I heard a most excellent sermon of Dr. Hacket, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, upon these words: “He that drinketh this water shall never thirst.” We had an excellent anthem, sung by Captain Cooke and another, and brave musique. And then the King came down and offered, and took the sacrament upon his knees; a sight very well worth seeing. Hence with Sir G. Carteret to his lodging to dinner with his Lady and one Mr. Brevin, a French Divine, we were very…
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    History in the News

  • a You Know the Duggars. Have You Met Bill Clinton's Pedophile Pal?

    22 May 2015 | 4:12 pm
    In the coming days and months our unbiased, objective mainstream media is going to ensure you know all about Josh Duggar, a 27 year-old reality star who just resigned from the Family Research Council after allegations surfaced that, as a teenager, he molested underage girls, including his own sisters. The reason you're going to know everything about this pig is because he is a Christian, a conservative, and has associated with the Republican Party, including a number of 2016 presidential candidates.
  • 19 long-dead Oregon hospital patients get military honors

    22 May 2015 | 3:10 pm
    They served in the Civil War, the Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War and World War I, but for decades, their ashes and those of thousands of others lay abandoned in corroded urns in a grisly outbuilding at Oregon's state psychiatric hospital.
  • 19 Long-Dead Oregon Hospital Patients Get Military Honors

    22 May 2015 | 3:10 pm
    They served in the Civil War, the Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War and World War I . But for decades, their ashes and those of thousands of others lay abandoned in corroded urns in an outbuilding at Oregon's state psychiatric hospital.
  • Tribute in brick and paint

    22 May 2015 | 2:05 pm
    Monroe artist David Hose's mural on the side of the American Legion hall in Snohomish depicts six wars from World War I to Iraq and Afghanistan, with a tribute to each branch of the military. Monroe artist David Hose's mural on the side of the American Legion hall in Snohomish depicts six wars from World War I to Iraq and Afghanistan, with a tribute to each branch of the military.
  • Clinton friend promises cooperation with panel probing Benghazi attacks

    22 May 2015 | 10:07 am
    Sidney Blumenthal, a longtime friend of Hillary Clinton who was an unofficial adviser while she was secretary of state, promised to cooperate with a congressional committee investigating the deadly 2012 attacks in Benghazi, Libya. Blumenthal, a former senior adviser on President Bill Clinton's White House staff, sent private intelligence reports on Libya, prepared by a former senior CIA officer, to Hillary Clinton before and after the attacks, which killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans.
 
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    Anglo-Dutch Wars

  • Two Dutch hired ships in the period of 1639 to 1654

    Jim
    27 Apr 2015 | 6:04 am
    The Dutch custom during early to mid-Seventeenth Century was to hire suitable private ships for use as warships. Sometimes, they were even hired by other countries. We only have to look to Louis de Geer and Sweden for an example of that situation. There are several ships that served in the First Anglo-Dutch War and for which we do not have dimensions. One was the ship Prins. The ship was also
  • The Dutch ship Vrijheid on 21 June 1653

    Jim
    12 Dec 2014 | 3:21 pm
    I have the inventory for the Dutch warship Vrijheid, dated 21 June 1653. The thing that caught my eye was that I had thought that the Vrijheid carried 52 guns on that date, but I was wrong, the Vrijheid had 50 guns: Lower Deck 4-24pdr 18-12pdr Upper Deck 4-12pdr 20-8pdr 2-6pdr 2-3pdr
  • Dingeman Cats in 1652 to 1653

    Jim
    12 Sep 2014 | 9:58 am
    Dingeman Cats served as a captain for the Admiralty of Zeeland in 1652 and 1653. At the beginning of the First Anglo-Dutch War, he commanded a hired ship, the Dolphijn. The Dolphijn was quite small with dimensions of 105ft x 24ft x ? x 5-1/2ft. The Dolphijn was armed with 14-8pdr, 8-4pdr, and 2-3pdr. A report on 6 December 1652 gave the crew as 73 sailors and 25 sailors. That was actually after
  • What we know about the Gecroonde Liefde, Marcus Hartman's ship, in 1653

    Jim
    5 Sep 2014 | 5:20 am
    Captain Marcus Hartman commanded the Middelburg Directors' ship Gecroonde Liefde in 1653. Early in the year, Michiel De Ruyter used the ship as his temporary flagship. After that, the Gecroonde Liefde continued to serve in his squadron. The Gecroonde Liefde was one of the ships that was lost in the storm off the Texel on about 9 November 1653. We know the dimensions of the Gecroonde Liefde: 136ft
  • The Zeven Provincien on 3 March 1672

    Jim
    17 May 2014 | 9:18 am
    We have a handwritten list that includes the details for the Zeven Provincien (the Dutch fleet flagship) as of 3 March 1672:Name: Zeven Provincien Admiralty: Admiralty of the Maze or Rotterdam Built: 1665 Length in Amsterdam feet: 163 feet Beam in Amsterdam feet: 43 feet Hold in Amsterdam feet: 16-1/2 feet Deck height in Amsterdam feet: 7-1/2 feet Guns 12-36pdr 16-24pdr 12-18pdr 18-12pdr
 
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    History on Air

  • Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II

    Jason
    28 Apr 2015 | 11:47 am
    Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II Check out the first chapter of Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II by Richard Reeves available everywhere on April 21.  3.9 out of 4 stars at Goodreads and 5 stars at Amazon.  I’ve got my copy and will be reading soon.  Let me know what you think in the comments.  
  • Two Gun Hart

    Jason
    5 Feb 2015 | 8:04 pm
    Two Gun Hart The author, Mr. McArthur, contacted me via email and told me about his new book coming out about Al Capone’s brother.  I didn’t know any of this and thought it was very interesting.  I knew my readers would enjoy this interesting tid-bit of information too!  In the interest of full disclosure Jeff is sending me a book.  Jeff gave me this little article to wet your appetite.  Enjoy! Richard Hart was a decorated veteran of World War I, an acrobat from wild west shows, a BIA agent, and one of the greatest Prohibition officers in the country. Though it was the 1920s,…
  • Book Review: Bold by Peter Diamandis

    Jason
    3 Dec 2014 | 5:09 pm
    I’ve just started reading Bold by Peter Diamandis and I’m already hooked.  It is a fascinating book.  In the first chapter he mentioned the company Quirky, that helps inventors get their products into the market. 3D Printing And now, in chapter two I’m reading about the company 3D Systems. They make 3D printers and I want one of those so bad now!  Only a thousand dollars.  Very cool stuff!  Did you know those Invisalign braces are all 3D printed per person? Made in Space creates 3D printers that are being used in the International Space Station!  Also, discovered…
  • Revolutionizing the Historic Slot Machine

    Jason
    17 Oct 2014 | 7:01 am
    The one-armed bandit is one of those things that every casino gamer who lived around the early 1900s is familiar with. Well, actually, anyone who sees an old slot machine – whether a novice or experienced gambler – will know how to play it. After all, how much simpler could a machine get? You pull a lever, wait for the reels to stop spinning, and hope that you get matching symbols. The Liberty Bell is considered the godfather of the modern slot machines. It was created by Charles Fey, a car mechanic based in San Francisco, in 1895. It is a three-reel model that is still used in some…
  • Sinclair ZX81

    Jason
    5 Mar 2014 | 8:00 am
    Sinclair ZX81 I wasn’t lucky enough to own a Sinclair when I was younger.  When the Sinclair ZX81 was released on March 5, 1981, I was only two years old.  Although, my father a fellow geek did give me his old Compaq portable when I was old enough to use it.  It was released two years later in January 1983.  But enough of my childhood memories this post is about the Sinclair.  The ZX81 was originally released only in the United Kingdom in March 1981 and later came to the shores of the US as the Timex Sinclair 1000.  It was designed to be a home computer.  It was designed on the cheap…
 
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    african american history - Google News

  • African-American history on exhibit at museum - GoDanRiver.com

    23 May 2015 | 2:53 am
    GoDanRiver.comAfrican-American history on exhibit at museumGoDanRiver.com... Amendments that secured freedom, citizenship and voting rights for African Americans, according to a news release from the museum. Four points in Danville's history are used to highlight barriers African-Americans faced after the amendments were Day in History: St. Charles approves $1.2 million school bond issuePost-Bulletinall 1,989 news articles »
  • African-Americans Need to Learn Black History - Miami New Times

    19 May 2015 | 6:00 am
    Miami New TimesAfrican-Americans Need to Learn Black HistoryMiami New TimesGo to any African-American neighborhood, whether it be in Miami or Baltimore, and chances are you won't find anyone under 30 who knows that a runaway black slave, Crispus Attucks, was the first casualty of the American Revolution. And likely no one
  • To Do Today: “Through the African-American Lens,” “Facing History,” and ... - Washington City Paper (blog)

    18 May 2015 | 8:01 am
    Washington City Paper (blog)To Do Today: “Through the African-American Lens,” “Facing History,” and Washington City Paper (blog)The National Museum of African American History and Culture won't open until 2016, but bits of its growing collection are now available to the public at the museum's temporary home within the National Museum of American History. This exhibit, “Through
  • How To Talk to Your Kids About the Contributions of African American Women - TIME

    18 May 2015 | 7:50 am
    TIMEHow To Talk to Your Kids About the Contributions of African American WomenTIMEParents often tend to focus on the accomplishments of famous men, like Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, says Tiya Miles, professor of African American History at University of Michigan, and a MacArthur genius. And when we do get around to women, Miles ...and more »
  • Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture to ... - Artforum

    18 May 2015 | 7:23 am
    ARTnewsSmithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture to Artforum2paragraphs reports that the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture will open in 2016 on the National Mall in Washington, DC. Originally established in 2003 by the George W. Bush administration, the museum will feature a ...Morning Links: National Museum of African American History and Culture EditionARTnewsAfrican-American Museum In DC Will Open In 20162paragraphs.comall 8 news articles »
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    History.com - This Day in History - Lead Story

  • May 23, 1934: Police kill famous outlaws Bonnie and Clyde

    22 May 2015 | 9:00 pm
    On this day in 1934, notorious criminals Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow are shot to death by Texas and Louisiana state police while driving a stolen car near Sailes, Louisiana. Bonnie Parker met the charismatic Clyde Barrow in Texas when she was 19 years old and her husband (she married when she was 16) was serving time in jail for murder. Shortly after they met, Barrow was imprisoned for robbery. Parker visited him every day, and smuggled a gun into prison to help him escape, but he was soon caught in Ohio and sent back to jail. When Barrow was paroled in 1932, he immediately hooked up with…
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    The New York History Blog

  • The Historic Apples of New York

    John Warren
    23 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    Every two years I gather together some friends to make hard cider. None of us have apple orchards. From the time the buds break throughout the summer, until after the first couple hard frosts, we scan the roads and fields of the Adirondacks. We look for abandoned orchards and clumps of neglected trees in yards […]
  • This Week’s New York History Web Highlights

    Editorial Staff
    22 May 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Slavery And The Rise Of American Capitalism Executed Today: Not Lambdin P. Milligan (1865) World War I and Modern Mapping How to Save a Place: Apply for Historic Designation Charles Bradley: Chemung County’s Tallest Man Anarchist Guide to Historic House Museums Google Earth And Archaeology Government Historians And The NCPH American Revolution: People and Power […]
  • Journalist Bill Buell on The Historians Podcast

    Bob Cudmore
    22 May 2015 | 9:00 am
    This week “The Historians Podcast” welcomes Daily Gazette features writer Bill Buell. Buell is the author of history books on Schenectady and Albany; he is working on a book on Schenectady’s Socialist Mayor, George Lunn. A native of Glenville and resident of Schenectady’s Stockade section, Bill is a graduate of Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake schools and […]
  • This Week’s Top New York History News

    Editorial Staff
    22 May 2015 | 6:22 am
    Open Data Handbook Issued NYS Archives Conference June 3-5 Big Changes Sought For Camp Santanoni Lost WWI Purple Heart Recovered Happy Rockefeller Dies At 88 Saint Rose Cuts 40 Jobs, Benefits Earliest Stone Tools Found in Kenya Former Lt. Gov. Alfred DelBello Dies David McCullough Gets History Award Hermione Welcome, July 4th Fest Planned Subscribe! […]
  • Planning A History Food Event? Consider This

    Gayle Ann Livecchia
    21 May 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Thanks to the FoodNetwork, The Cooking Channel, TLC, and a variety of other shows, a society of foodies has been created and encouraged. Understandably, tourism has become part of the foodie craze – farmer markets are now part of destination shopping. Museums and historical societies have used food programs as fundraising opportunities and to attract […]
 
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    Toptenz.net

  • 10 Cyborgs You Could Meet Today

    Addevi Persaud
    22 May 2015 | 9:10 pm
    When we think of cyborgs our minds immediately go to science fiction. But in a way, cyborgs already exist — just look at people with pacemakers and ear implants. Their bodies are a combination of organic, bio-mechanical and electronic parts. And if that’s too ordinary for you, there are people who have integrated technology into […] The post 10 Cyborgs You Could Meet Today appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • Top 10 Ways Agatha Christie Rocked Girl Power

    Ramona Depares
    21 May 2015 | 9:10 pm
    We may find it difficult to believe that Agatha Christie, a Victorian wife and mother who wrote crime stories set in rural England, supported feminism through her writings. Indeed, we will find many critics like Johann Hari who tell us that Christie did exactly the opposite, incorporating “a hostility to feminism” into her stories. The […] The post Top 10 Ways Agatha Christie Rocked Girl Power appeared first on Toptenz.net.
  • 10 Ways Self-Driving Cars Will Change the World

    Robert Grimminck
    20 May 2015 | 9:10 pm
    Autonomous cars used to only be found in science fiction, but over the past few years a number of companies, including Google and Mercedes-Benz, have been developing cars that will drive themselves. It’s believed that the first autonomous cars will be ready for the public by the year 2025, and by the year 2040 most […] The post 10 Ways Self-Driving Cars Will Change the World appeared first on Toptenz.net.
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    History Of Macedonia

  • Σκόπια: Προκλήσεις κατά της Ελλάδας στη συγκέντρωση του Γκρούεφσκι

    Stern
    20 May 2015 | 7:12 am
    Ποντάρει στο εθνικιστικό χαρτί ο σκοπιανός πρωθυπουργός – Μεγάλη κινητοποίηση με κεντρικό σύνθημα «Ισχυρή Μακεδονία» μπροστά από το κτίριο της σκοπιανής βουλής Παναγιώτης Σαββίδης Σημαίες με τον 16ακτινο Ήλιο της Βεργίνας και χάρτες της λεγόμενης «Μεγάλης Μακεδονίας», κρατούσαν οπαδοί του κυβερνώντος κόμματος VMRO-DPMNE στα…
  • Ιστοσελίδα «κράζει» το κιτς στα Σκόπια: Πώς να χτίσετε μια ψεύτικη αρχαία πόλη σε 5 χρόνια

    Stern
    19 May 2015 | 10:43 am
    Ογκώδη αγάλματα, κτήρια νεοκλασικού στυλ, μπερδεμένα με την σταλινική αρχιτεκτονική, έτσι που δημιουργούν ένα αποκρουστικό αποτέλεσμα, είναι η εντύπωση του έγκυρου ταξιδιωτικού οδηγού για το μεγάλο πρότζεκτ των γειτόνων να δώσουν χαρακτήρα στην πρωτεύουσά τους «Πώς να χτίσετε μια ψεύτικη αρχαία πόλη μέσα σε μόλις πέντε…
  • Βαθαίνει η πολιτική κρίση στα Σκόπια

    Stern
    19 May 2015 | 2:59 am
    Οπαδοί του πρωθυπουργού Νίκολα Γκρούεφσκι διαδήλωσαν χθες στα Σκόπια ΓΡΑΦΕΙ Ο ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ ΤΕΛΙΔΗΣ Η ΠΓΔΜ βυθίζεται όλο και περισσότερο στο πολιτικό αδιέξοδο και στην πολιτική κρίση, που τροφοδοτούν την ένταση.Λίγες ώρες μετά το ναυάγιο και της δεύτερης συνάντησης των τεσσάρων πολιτικών αρχηγών των μεγαλύτερων κομμάτων της…
  • Αντίδραση της Ελλάδας στην αναφορά των Σκοπίων ως “Μακεδονίας” στο ΝΑΤΟ

    Stern
    18 May 2015 | 11:30 pm
      Η ελληνική αντιπροσωπεία στην κοινή συνεδρίαση των υπουργών Εξωτερικών και Άμυνας της ΕΕ, αντέδρασε άμεσα στην αναφορά του Γενικού Γραμματέα του ΝΑΤΟ, Γενς Στόλτενμπεργκ, ο οποίος αποκάλεσε τα Σκόπια ως «Μακεδονία», έγινε γνωστό το βράδυ της Δευτέρας. Επιπλέον, οι ίδιες πηγές ανέφεραν ότι θα αποσταλεί επίσημη επιστολή…
  • «Μακεδονία» λέει τα Σκόπια ο γγ του ΝΑΤΟ

    Stern
    18 May 2015 | 10:56 am
    Λίγες μέρες αφότου χόρεψε «αγκαζέ» με τον Νίκο Κοτζιά το «We Are The World», ο γγ Γενς Στόλτενμπεργκ αποκάλεσε τα Σκόπια τέσσερις φορές «Μακεδονία». Ο γγ του ΝΑΤΟ Γενς Στόλτενμπεργκ προσερχόμενος σήμερα στο Συμβούλιο της Ευρωπαϊκής Ένωσης για συμμετάσχει στην κοινή συνεδρίαση των Υπουργών Εξωτερικών και Άμυνας των «28», κάλεσε όλα…
 
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    Blog > WW2History.com

  • Ardennes 1944

    laurence
    21 May 2015 | 10:48 am
    Antony Beevor’s new book ‘Ardennes 1944: Hitler’s Last Gamble’ is published today. The appearance of a new book by the master of military history is always special, and this new work does not disappoint. The book displays all of the skills as a historian that have justifiably made Beevor famous. He combines a meticulous attention to detail with an ability to explain the immensity of the campaign and its context within this most horrific of wars. In particular, his description and assessment of the character of the British commander, Bernard Montgomery, is quite…
  • The Oskar Groening I met

    laurence
    23 Apr 2015 | 1:58 am
    Oskar Groening I met Oskar Groening, the former SS soldier from Auschwitz whose trial started this week, more than 10 years ago. We were filming him for a BBC TV series I wrote and produced called ‘Auschwitz: The Nazis and the ‘Final Solution”. The interview he gave us is of real historical importance, since he offered insights into the role of the SS at Auschwitz that I’ve not heard anywhere else. But that’s not what I want to talk about today. If you want to read the views he expressed in his interview then just look in the book I wrote about Auschwitz. I…
  • Podcast

    laurence
    9 Mar 2015 | 8:10 am
    The Holocaust Educational Trust have just put online a podcast I recorded with their head of education, Alex Maws. It’s about my views on the nature of perpetrators and you can listen to it here: HET Podcast
  • Advance press for ‘Touched by Auschwitz’

    laurence
    25 Jan 2015 | 2:46 am
    ‘Touched by Auschwitz’ transmits on BBC2 at 9pm on Tuesday 27 January ‘This immensely powerful programme’ The Times ‘Superb’ The Daily Telegraph ‘Laurence Rees’s film tracks down six survivors of the camp in five countries to ask the complex questions of how a person endures the unendurable and then explains the inexplicable’ The Guardian ‘Hard hitting… compelling’ Daily Mail After watching this documentary, you may well think that the human spirit is unbreakable’ Daily Mirror ‘Excellent’ Sunday Times…
  • Touched by Auschwitz

    laurence
    14 Jan 2015 | 9:53 am
    My new film, ‘Touched by Auschwitz’, a ninety minute feature length documentary, will transmit in the United Kingdom on BBC2 on Holocaust Memorial Day, Tuesday 27 January at 9 pm. It’s my attempt to answer one of the most profound questions of the Holocaust. What was the human legacy of the crime? It explores the experiences of six Auschwitz survivors – telling of their survival in the years after liberation and moving right up to the present day.  I’ve traveled extensively in order to film these remarkable people, along with their friends and families. …
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    Claire Gebben

  • So what are you finding out?

    clairegebben
    4 May 2015 | 4:01 pm
    As I talk with friends and writers about research progress for my current novel about Scottish immigrants to America in the 18th century, their eyes light up. “So what are you finding out?” they want to know. I flounder for an answer to this question, because very little is straightforward. I’ll stumble upon a thread of historical interest here, another there. In isolation, the info doesn’t mean all that much. Woven together, though, a tapestry begins to emerge. For instance, a book I came across at Fairview Park Library in Cleveland. When I arrived, I went first to…
  • Off the beaten track

    clairegebben
    22 Apr 2015 | 5:28 pm
    I left Buffalo heading south to the upper Ohio River valley to fit in a little book research on the Scots Settlement. On the way, I decided to make an extracurricular stop at the Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz Museum in Jamestown, NY, just to see what it was like. Often it’s these off-the-beaten-track side trips that bring about the most wonderful encounters, and this sojourn proved no exception. I had just seen a sign that I’d entered Conewango, NY, when a horse and wagon trotted over the rise in the road coming straight toward me, then made a sharp turn into … a blacksmith…
  • Buffalo surprises

    clairegebben
    20 Apr 2015 | 4:55 pm
    I lived in Buffalo for a few years in the 1980s, so I should know all about it, right? Home of hot spicy chicken wings and Friday fish fries, the Peace Bridge and lake effect snow. The place where President McKinley was shot in 1901 at the Pan American Exhibition, and where Theodore Roosevelt was sworn in when McKinley died? This past weekend when visiting my friend John, my preconceived notion that I “know” Buffalo was seriously challenged. Take, for instance, the 2015 Boom Days. They’ve only been around since 2002, but the festival, and the location of the festival at Silo…
  • Historic Zoar Village

    clairegebben
    11 Apr 2015 | 3:11 pm
    What a beautiful Saturday for opening day of the season at Historic Zoar Village. I enjoyed talking at the Old Schoolhouse, and lunch at the Canal Tavern where John Elsass showed us a cellar to rival the cellars of southwest Germany. For a few moments I was able to visit with Scott, the blacksmith who gives demonstrations and teaches classes at the operating coal forge. If you’re ever in the neighborhood — off I-77 just South of Canton — I highly recommend a visit. The post Historic Zoar Village appeared first on Claire Gebben.
  • Cleveland historic B&B

    clairegebben
    10 Apr 2015 | 1:13 pm
    I put off finding a hotel for too long prior to arrival in Cleveland — so many other things to do — so when I finally made some calls, there was no room at the inn. Does Cleveland have B&B’s? I asked myself. I needed to be in Rocky River last night, so I searched the West Side, and sure enough, found a great place just off W. 25th, where all the great new pubs and microbrews are located, right near the signature West Side Market. Clifford House. Owner James Miner was great and welcoming, and cooked up a delicious breakfast, besides. Best of all, I slept really, really…
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    Annoyz View

  • Portuguese Inquisition of Goa

    annoyzview
    11 May 2015 | 9:30 pm
    Goa is a small state situated in West India. This region has become a tourist hub within India, for its attractive beaches and decorated Churches. It has one of the largest Christian populations within India. But history has a cruel tale to unfold that happened in Goa. The event referred to happened during the Portuguese colonization of Goa. It is popularly known as the Inquisition of Goa. Though Indian mainland was ruled by British, Goa was under the control of Portuguese. King Manuel I of Portugal had introduced Inquisition in Portugal in 1497. St Francis Xavier requested Inquisition of Goa…
  • Leif Eriksson: First to Reach the New World

    annoyzview
    10 May 2015 | 9:30 pm
    Though Christopher is revered for his discovery of America which was fondly renamed as the New World, it was the Viking explorer Leif Erikson who beat him by at least 500 years. Leif was the first European to land in North America. According to the Sagas of Icelanders, this Viking hero even established a Norse settlement in Vinland that lies in the northern tip of Newfoundland in modern day Canada. Bust of Great Viking Explorer Leif Eriksson   Leif Eriksson was the son of Erik the Red and his wife Thjodhild. He was born sometime in 970-980 AD in Iceland. In his childhood Leif was raised…
  • Mystery of Martin Bormann

    annoyzview
    8 May 2015 | 9:30 pm
    Martin Bormann was a famous figure during the Third Reich. He acted as Hitler’s deputy and there is a lot of controversy surrounding his death. Bormann was born on June 17, 1900. He was the son of a Prussian regimental sergeant major. He dropped out of school at an early age and started working at a farming estate in Mecklenburg. After this he worked as a cannoneer in field artillery during World War I. Soon after Bormann joined the rightist Rossbach Freikorps in Mecklenburg and was connected to a murder case. On March 1924 he was sentenced to one year imprisonment for assisting Rudolf Hoss…
  • Mystery of RMS Titanic

    annoyzview
    7 May 2015 | 9:30 pm
    RMS Titanic was a magnificent ship, known for its luxury and sophistication. It was one among the trio of Olympic class luxury passenger vessels that were made to rule the waves. Titanic had an older and younger sister – RMS Olympic and HMHS Britannic. All these ships were the brainchild of White Star Line and shipbuilders Harland and Wolff situated in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Work on Titanic began on March 31, 1909 roughly after 15 weeks when Olympic’s hull was laid out. Both these ships were identical in styles. Both were massive floating vessels with the keel acting as the support…
  • Commodus: The Emperor who fought as a Gladiator

    annoyzview
    6 May 2015 | 9:30 pm
    Roman Emperor Lucius Aurelius Commodus is known in history as a corrupt and mad king who was not well received by the Roman populace during his reign. He identified himself as an incarnation of the mythical hero Hercules and fought in the gladiator arena. He adopted outrageous tactics such as slaying the crippled and slaughtered wild beasts while in the arena. His acts created a negative impression and played a big role in his eventual assassination. Historians believe the reign of Commodus as the start of decline of mighty Roman Empire. His rule was marked with chaos all around. Bust of…
 
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    Ancient Origins

  • Purification as the Core of the Ancient Shinto Faith

    Ryan Stone
    22 May 2015 | 1:40 pm
    A ritual based religion, Shintoism is defined as "the way of the gods" in Japan, from the Chinese Shendao.  It is the indigenous religion of the country, and survives today as the state religion, primarily because it allows for the continued infusion of other faiths into its core structure, as seen when Buddhism was incorporated into the faith centuries ago.  The core of Shintoism, however, is the kami system, or the belief in multiple spirits of the universe, making these adaptations viable because they are more focused on the natural world and the elements than on specific individual…
  • The Surprising and Iconic Bronze Age Egtved Girl: Teenage Remains Tell a Story of Trade and Travel

    lizleafloor
    22 May 2015 | 1:27 pm
    One of the best-known Danish Bronze-Age burials, the well preserved Egtved Girl was found in a barrow in 1921. Her woolen clothing, hair, and nails were perfectly preserved, but all her bones were missing. Scientists studying the ancient teenager’s remains have now made the surprising discovery that the Egtved Girl traveled great distances before her death, and wasn’t from Denmark at all. A study has been published in the journal Nature detailing the results of modern tests done by scientists. Strontium isotope analysis on Egtved Girl’s molar, hair, and fingernails, combined with…
  • Great Salt Lake of Utah gives up its Prehistoric Gambling Secrets from the 13th Century

    Robin Whitlock
    22 May 2015 | 11:30 am
    Hundreds of gambling implements, including dice, hoops, carved sticks and other items, have been found in a cave on the shore of the Great Salt Lake, known simply as ‘Cave 1’, according to a report by Science and News website Western Digs. The items were used in games of skill and chance and archaeologists believe there may be more than 10,000 other implements still to be found. If so, it will be the largest collection of ancient gambling artifacts ever discovered in the western US. The items, along with artifacts from previous explorations, are currently being studied by archaeologists…
  • Chronicles from the Future: A True Story Kept Hidden by the Masons now Revealed

    Achilleas Syrigos
    22 May 2015 | 8:37 am
    Chronicles from the Future tells a remarkable story about a bizarre and incredible event experienced by Paul Amadeus Dienach, the author, who lived during the beginning of the previous century in central Europe. Dienach claims that during his one-year comatose state, brought about by a serious illness, his consciousness travelled to the future in a different body and stayed there for the entire duration of his coma.  Although this sounds impossible and indeed fanciful, Dienach’s written account was taken very seriously by the Freemasons, who kept his book as a closely guarded secret. There…
  • Workers find old underground tunnel near medieval fort, home of Ganga dynasty rulers

    Mark Miller
    22 May 2015 | 6:49 am
    A team of construction workers digging in the ancient city of Cuttack discovered an old underground tunnel and structure near an ancient fort and the capital of the rulers of the Eastern Ganga Dynasty in Odisha State south of Kolkata. Workers dug a trench 12 feet (4 m) deep to lay sewerage pipe when they came upon the tunnel, Officials halted work and intend to hire archaeologists to research what the tunnel is. One report said it was a British-era structure, others believe it is much older.  The Times of India describes it as a “tunnel-like structure.”Read moreSection: NewsHistory…
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    Rogues Gallery

  • “Don’t Call Me Bugsy!”

    The Rake Yesterday
    26 Apr 2015 | 9:42 am
    Nevada 1947 Bugsy was a handsome guy – a real Carey Grant. He don’t look so good now. The bullet hit him on the bridge of his nose and blew his left eyeball clean out – they reckon it was lying fifteen feet away from the sofa. Another went through his cheek and came out of his neck, he took a couple more in the chest…made a real mess of the upholstery. Guess it goes to show no ones immune when you`re in debt to the Mob. One minute he’s sat in his girlfriends pad, reading the newspaper, the next they`re looking for his baby blues underneath the furniture. Can’t say I’m surprised,…
  • “It’s The Devil’s club…I just manage it for him”

    The Rake Yesterday
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:11 am
    London 1723 I like a good orgy as well as the next fellow, but having a drop of blasphemy would really spice it up. “Prigging a Convenient” is much more exciting when she’s dressed as a nun. It’s such a shame the king outlawed our little “Hell-Fire Club.” It only lasted a year but they were great days, much more fun than clubs like The Kit Kat or The Beef Steak,  with all that political posturing. When I stopped calling myself a “Mohock” I really thought my youthful days of wild abandon would be over. Thanks to our former club president, Phillip Duke of Wharton, I…
  • If its new, different or not from this country…I HATE IT!

    The Rake Yesterday
    12 Oct 2014 | 9:17 am
    1852 Sir - As a proud Englishman – who despairs of the depraved cess pit of moral filth into which this once great country has become immersed  – may I use the pages of your august ( if somewhat “Liberal” ) newspaper to extol the virtues of the one gentleman who, alone, stands between Albion and the blackest pits of hell. Colonel Charles de Laet Waldo Sibthorp MP. I heartily agree with this visionary man when he says that foreigners should be distrusted, science and “Progress” is ruining this country and the world was a far, far better place in the halcyon days of our golden…
  • “Did You Just Spill My Pint?!”

    The Rake Yesterday
    2 Oct 2014 | 8:40 am
    London 1712 Its 6 am, welcome to a glorious November morning here in London’s Hyde Park for what promises to be a truly honourable meeting of two gentlemen, settling their differences in a respectable way. ….By dueling. To my left is James Douglas, 4th Duke of Hamilton , Peer of Scotland and “Master of the Great Wardrobe” accompanied by his “Second”,  Colonel John Hamilton. For those of you not familiar with dueling  (perhaps you work on a farm) “A Second” is a close friend of each combatant who makes sure the duel is fair and honourable and who can also cross swords…
  • Hey Hey We’re The Mohocks!

    The Rake Yesterday
    11 Sep 2014 | 2:39 pm
    LONDON 1712 I don’t know what the youth of this country are coming to, I really don’t. The respectable classes can no longer set foot outside their homes after dusk without fear of molestation – and worse – from gangs of lustful, drink addled cutthroats whom Satan himself would spurn. Or so the pamphleteers say. They call themselves “Mohocks” – after a cannibal tribe in India – and all genteel London trembles with terror at news of their outrages. “Read all about it”   I have fallen into a swoon myself several times since Monday. It’s all in the pages of…
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    DisputedPast

  • The hunter-gatherer man: macho or metro?

    Jan Huisman
    18 May 2015 | 1:30 am
    British scientist from the University College of London state that men and women in hunter-gatherer societies had similar roles and social status. Men were just as important at raising children and gathering food as women. This contradicts the popular image of the hunter-gatherer man as a primitive macho. Men and... Read full history →
  • How the death penalty contributed to a better society

    Jan Huisman
    16 Mar 2015 | 8:09 am
    The death penalty created a better society in Europe. From the 11th to the 18th century, the death penalty contributed to a more peaceful society, while the genes of violent men were extinguished. American and Canadian researchers published an article in Evolutionary Psychology. Violence and death penalty during the early... Read full history →
  • Alexander the Great: has he been found?

    Jan Huisman
    20 Jan 2015 | 1:55 am
    Human remains of a woman, a newborn baby and two men were found earlier at the newly found archaeological site of Amphipoles. As DisputedPast reported, these people lived during the era of the legendary Alexander the Great. Clearly, they were of the noble class. It was thought that the woman... Read full history →
  • Tomb discovered of a fifth dynasty Egyptian queen

    Jan Huisman
    4 Jan 2015 | 12:55 pm
    Czech archaeologists have discovered the tomb in Egypt of an unknown queen: Chentkaus III. She was probably the wife of a pharaoh who belonged to the fifth dynasty, about 4,500 years ago, according to the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities. “It’s the first time we discover the name of the queen,... Read full history →
 
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    Ancient History Encyclopedia

  • Gupta Architecture

    22 May 2015 | 7:27 am
    The Gupta Dynasty, founded by Chandragupta I (accession c. 320 CE), ruled in North Central India between the 4th and 6th centuries CE and the period is considered a golden age of artistic accomplishment. The Guptas were the first architects of purpose-built Hindu (but sometimes also Buddhist) temples which evolved from the earlier tradition of rock-cut shrines. Adorned with towers and elaborate carvings...
  • Vishnu as Varaha, Udayagiri Caves

    22 May 2015 | 12:42 am
    A sculpted panel at the Gupta-period (4th-6th century CE) caves of Udayagiri, Madhya Pradesh, India. The caves are rock-cut Hindu shrines and this panel shows Vishnu as the boar-headed incarnation Varaha. The god rises from the cosmic waters, defeating the primeval serpent monster, and rescuing the goddess Bhudevi (earth), who hangs from his tusk.Photo by…
  • Vishnu as Varaha, Udayagiri Caves

    22 May 2015 | 12:42 am
    A sculpted panel at the Gupta-period (4th-6th century CE) caves of Udayagiri, Madhya Pradesh, India. The caves are rock-cut Hindu shrines and this panel shows Vishnu as the boar-headed incarnation Varaha. The god rises from the cosmic waters, defeating the primeval serpent monster, and rescuing the goddess Bhudevi (earth), who hangs from his tusk.Photo by Jean-Pierre Dalbéra (Creative Commons: Attribution...
  • Vishnu as Varaha, Udayagiri Caves

    22 May 2015 | 12:42 am
    A sculpted panel at the Gupta-period (4th-6th century CE) caves of Udayagiri, Madhya Pradesh, India. The caves are rock-cut Hindu shrines and this panel shows Vishnu as the boar-headed incarnation Varaha. The god rises from the cosmic waters, defeating the primeval serpent monster, and rescuing the goddess Bhudevi (earth), who hangs from his tusk.Photo by Jean-Pierre Dalbéra (Creative Commons: Attribution...
  • What Caused The Mysterious Bronze Age Collapse?

    20 May 2015 | 6:44 am
    The decline of the Late Bronze Age civilizations of the Mediterranean and Near East has puzzled historians and archaeologists for centuries. While many have ascribed the collapse of several civilizations to the enigmatic Sea Peoples, Professor Eric H. Cline, former Chair of the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at George Washington University, presents a more complicated...
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    New Historian

  • Mark Twain

    Daryl Worthington
    22 May 2015 | 2:03 pm
    Mark Twain was a writer synonymous with the United States, one capable of capturing the mood of a specific time in the country’s history while also creating timeless characters. Born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Missouri, in 1835, (Mark Twain was his pen name) Twain lived through one of the most volatile periods in US history, witnessing the Civil War, the Reconstruction Era, an economic boom and recession, and the beginnings of America’s move away from isolationism to become a key power in world affairs. Hugely prolific, Twain published a plethora of novels, as well as articles,…
  • Medieval Shipwreck Law Reveals Complex Legal Process

    Adam Steedman Thake
    22 May 2015 | 12:49 pm
    The history of law is closely connected with the development of civilisations. How the law evolves and adapts can reveal a huge amount about changing aspects of society. One of the defining periods in European law was the medieval period. Medieval European scholars began researching the law which had existed in the Roman Empire. By reapplying the concepts of Roman law, medieval states began to take the first steps towards our modern legal tradition. It is widely recognised that medieval law was more than a system of words which were simply confined to lawyerly debate and scholarly treatises.
  • First Contemporary Shakespeare Portrait Revealed in Herball

    Irina Slav
    22 May 2015 | 12:41 pm
    A British botanist and historian, Mark Griffiths, claims he has identified the first contemporary portrait of William Shakespeare, an engraved image on the title page of John Gerard’s ‘Herball’, a comprehensive work on botany written in the late sixteenth century. Detailing his find in Country Life magazine, Griffiths said the identity of the man in the engraving had been coded with a set of symbols and a pattern of plants. What made the discovery possible was not just Griffiths’ knowledge of plants, but his understanding of how plants were used in a symbolic way to refer…
  • The First Battle of the Wars of the Roses

    Daryl Worthington
    21 May 2015 | 10:16 am
    On 22nd May, 560 years ago, the opening battle of the Wars of the Roses was fought between the armies of the Houses of York and Lancaster at St. Albans, a town north of London. The series of conflicts over the English throne would rage for another thirty years, as the two powerful dynasties competed for power. The opening battle saw the Yorkists defeat King Henry VI’s Lancastrian forces, with many important Lancastrian nobles dying in the fighting, including the powerful Duke of Somerset. Although after the defeat the king was forced to submit to the rule of his cousin, Richard of York,…
  • British Collaboration During The Arab Revolt

    Adam Steedman Thake
    21 May 2015 | 9:47 am
    Between 1920 and 1944, Great Britain administered Palestine, a period referred to as the ‘British Mandate.’ One of the key issues during this period was the – in the words of the mandate for British rule – ‘establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, it being clearly understood that nothing should be done which might prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country.’ Not all groups were satisfied with this mandate, however. In 1936, a large Arab…
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    The List Love » History

  • 10 Reasons You Want to be Queen Elizabeth II

    The List Love
    15 May 2015 | 11:43 am
    Have you ever wondered what it was like to be Queen Elizabeth II? There has to be some perks for being queen of 16 of 53 member states in the Commonwealth of Nations. Here are 10 reasons you will want to be Queen Elizabeth II. 1. Queen Elizabeth’s Shoes image via www.manchesterfashion.com How would you like to take a walk in Queen Elizabeth II’s shoes? All you have to do is become a member of her household staff, because an employee will wear Her Majesty’s shoes before she puts them on to make sure they are comfortable. 2. £5 Note image via currencyguide.eu Before Her Royal Highness…
  • 10 Unbelievable Albert Einstein Facts

    The List Love
    14 May 2015 | 7:45 am
    We here at The List Love are offering 10 unbelievable Albert Einstein facts that will make your jaw drop. Many people know Einstein as the man behind EMC=2, or as one of the most influential physicists of the 20th century. There was, however, so much more to the Nobel Prize Winner, as you’re about to find out… 1. Einstein & His First Cousin image via www.tyneoconnell.com Albert Einstein once said “rejoice with your family in the beautiful land of life” – wise words from a very wise man. In fact, Albert Einstein loved to rejoice with his family so much that he…
  • 10 Interesting Facts About The Louvre

    The List Love
    12 May 2015 | 6:37 am
    The Louvre is one of Paris’ most visited attractions, welcoming approximately 9.3 million visitors per year. The reason for its popularity is its collection of 35,000 priceless masterpieces and antiques, and is therefore offers the most extensive art galleries for its breadth of subjects, which range from 6th century BC to 19th century. In celebration of this popular museum and art gallery, here are 10 interesting facts about the Louvre. 1. The Biggest Museum in the World image via www.cnn.com The Louvre is the biggest museum in the world. It is so big that it is humanely impossible…
  • 10 Final Photographs to Make You Appreciate Life

    The List Love
    22 Apr 2015 | 5:05 am
    Life is incredibly short, as the following last photos will show you. We must learn to appreciate each and every day we wake up on Earth, and enjoy the company of our loved ones as much as possible. If you take away anything from the following 10 final photographs to make you appreciate life, we hope it’s just how lucky we all are to be here. 1. Moira Smith image via http://911anniversary.nydailynews.com/ Moira Smith was just another NYC police officer on 11th September, 2001, but when the World Trade Center began to collapse following a terrorist attack, she proved she was no ordinary…
  • 10 William Shakespeare Facts to Blow Your Socks Off

    The List Love
    20 Apr 2015 | 5:37 am
    William Shakespeare is the most celebrated wordsmith of all time – so The List Love is offering some amazing facts on the bard. Our goal is to provide us with some interesting trivia about the English poet, playwright and actor that you may not know. So, here are 10 William Shakespeare facts that will blow your socks off. 1. Shakespeare’s Final Residence image via www.telegraph..co.uk New Place served as William Shakespeare’s final residence, but it was later demolished by the very person who purchased the property in 1756, Reverend Francis Gastrell. The homeowner quickly…
 
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    Milling Minutes

  • Mill Connections Run Deep

    chapmansmill
    19 May 2015 | 1:22 pm
    ‘Beverley Mills’ Receipt to William Moncure Blackwell   During TTMAC’s recent Adopt a Stone weekend, we were fortunate to meet numerous members of the Broad Run community as wells as many from farther afield.  We were thrilled to talk with everyone and share our plans for the future of the site, but most of all it was a great opportunity for us to hear what the Mill means to our supporters.  Almost everyone who attended the event had a story to tell about their connection to the Mill – and the variety of those stories was remarkable.  Some had ancestors who traveled to…
  • Preserving Our Archaeological Resources

    chapmansmill
    12 May 2015 | 12:16 pm
    Backhoe Test at Edge of Current Road Over the last few weekswe have received several questions about the impact that our upcoming site work will have on the archaeology at the Mill.  Moving bulldozers into an area with potentially significant prehistoric and historic artifacts yet to be unearthed is a frightening proposition, but TTMAC has been careful to make plans that will have the least possible impact on the Mill’s archaeological resources.  Here are two great examples ofhow the Campaign is working to preserve the site. Bulldozing will only take place on the current road bed.
  • Adopt a Stone Campaign Kickoff This Weekend

    chapmansmill
    27 Apr 2015 | 11:00 am
    Adopt a Stone Campaign Kickoff This Weekend! Next Saturday and Sunday, May 2-3, is a big weekend in the Virginia Piedmont. On Saturday, the Virginia Gold Cup races will be held at Great Meadow in The Plains, continuing a 93-year tradition that started in nearby Warrenton. Thousands of steeplechase spectators will be motoring out in cars and buses from the DC metro area to partake of the sport of kings, and a bit of imbibing along the way. To get to Great Meadow, these merry makers will traverse Thoroughfare Gap and pass in full view of Chapman’s Mill, now adorned with its “Adopt a…
  • Way Better Than a Pet Rock!

    chapmansmill
    19 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    You can now own a piece of Chapman Beverley Mill. The Turn the Mill Around Campaign is launching an innovative new fundraiser to get the planned park underway this year. Adopt-A-Stone allows anyone to adopt one or more of the beautiful ancient stones that comprise the mill walls – the tallest stacked stone structure in the U.S. The campaign launches May 2-3 at the mill and continues through the next few months via the website. The stones were born as liquid more than a billion years ago when two continents collided. Over millions of years, the continents separated and the liquid rock slowly…
  • Adopt a Stone

    chapmansmill
    14 Apr 2015 | 2:22 pm
    Adopt a Stone begins May 2, 2015 Since its construction in 1742, the Mill has weathered all manner of storms.  Economic downturns, wars, arson and even floods have all taken a toll, but through it all, the community has continued to value, cherish and protect this beautiful old structure. TTMAC understands the important role the Mill has played in the community and now we want to share the Mill in a brand new way. Beginning in May, individuals will be able to adopt one of the Chapman – Beverley Mill’s many stones.  Come out to the Mill on May 2 and 3 10AM to 5PM and make your…
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    Made From History

  • Is Thomas Paine the Forgotten Founding Father?

    Alex Browne
    17 May 2015 | 4:08 am
    Thomas Paine was a paradoxical man. As the author of three major texts – Common Sense, Rights of Man and Age of Reason – Thomas Paine was a revolutionary, best-selling author. However, until his late-found success, Paine had seemed destined to die an abject failure. He was a pensive philosopher who could rouse men to take up arms in the cause of liberty. A deeply religious man who was widely condemned as an atheist and blasphemer. An advocate of peace, stability and order who lived a disordered life intertwined with insurrection and rebellion. His ideas and achievements have a consistent…
  • What Impact Did the Unions Have on the Civil Rights Movement?

    Alex Browne
    17 May 2015 | 4:06 am
    The notion of a labour union is rooted in egalitarianism, in promoting the rights of workers through solidarity and unity. This core principle seems to sit comfortably with the idea of racial equality. However, historically in the USA labour unions have found themselves on both sides of the civil rights debate. When they were supportive, it was often more out of necessity than genuine belief. Despite this, organized labour was the background for towering figures in the movement – A Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther in particular. All played elemental roles in the…
  • 5 Light Machine Guns of World War One

    Matthew Moss
    17 May 2015 | 3:55 am
    When we think of the First World War the weapon that often comes to mind first is the water-cooled Maxim machine gun.  The Maxim gun came to dominate the battlefield, rapidly halting the war of movement in 1914 seeing the beginning of a stalemate that would last four bloody years.     As the stalemate dragged on both sides sought new ways to break the deadlock.  Everything from colossal artillery bombardments to tanks and chemical weapons were tried but one of the simplest ideas was for a portable, mobile machine gun capable of being operated by one or two men that could use its high rate…
  • 8 May 1945: Victory in Europe Day and the Defeat of the Axis

    Craig Bessell
    8 May 2015 | 5:28 am
    On 7 May 1945 Grand Admiral Donitz, who was put in command of the Third Reich following Hitler’s suicide a week earlier, met with senior allied officers, from Britain, America, France and Russia, in Reims, France and offered a full surrender, officially bringing an end to the conflict in Europe. Not Just an End to Fighting Victory in Europe day, or VE day as it is more commonly known, was celebrated by the whole of Britain, and the 8 May was declared a public holiday. But as word spread of the events in France people took to the streets in their thousands to rejoice at the end of one of…
  • 10 Facts about Erwin Rommel – The Desert Fox

    Matthew Moss
    1 May 2015 | 10:25 am
    Field Marshal Erwin Rommel is best known for his astounding successes in North Africa against great odds but the man was a more complex than the legend.  Winston Churchill once described him as a “very daring and skilful opponent… a great general” but he was also a devoted husband and father and a man that struggled with depression and self-doubt during the most difficult periods of his career. Here are some facts about Nazi Germany’s most famous general: 1. First Accepted Into the Infantry In 1909 at the age of 18 Rommel made his first attempt to join the military.
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    eaglesanddragonspublishing.com

  • Hero of Rome: An Interview with Author Douglas Jackson

    AdamAH
    18 May 2015 | 5:22 pm
    It’s always a thrill to stumble upon a new work of historical fiction that really meets your needs and expectations as a reader. I’ve been working on my own books so much lately that I haven’t been taking the time I should to read in my chosen genre. Time is precious, of course, but as writers we need to remember to keep reading. So, I went in search of a new series and found Douglas Jackson’s Gaius Valerius Verrens series. I’ve just finished the first book, Hero of Rome, and what an adventure! I couldn’t put this book down. The reader, writer, and historian in me was greatly…
  • Ancient Everyday – Mirror Mirror

    AdamAH
    11 May 2015 | 6:48 pm
    I thought I would try a new series of blog posts looking briefly at everyday items in the ancient world. Historical fiction is often about great battles, political events, and large-than-life characters. However, one of the things that anchors these stories more firmly in the past are the everyday items that decorate the homes of the characters around whom the stories revolve, or the tools they use without a passing thought. We might not notice these items ourselves, as readers, but trust me, if they were missing you would get the impression that the story was not quite authentic, or that it…
  • The King is Dead – The Passing of an Arthur

    AdamAH
    4 May 2015 | 6:27 pm
    It’s always a sad thing to hear of the passing of an artist whose work has made a lasting impression. It seems that every year more and more names shuffle off this mortal coil, leaving us with our own perceptions of their public face, but more so the faces of the roles they played. This morning I found out that British actor Nigel Terry passed away at the age of 69. Many people might not know Nigel Terry at first mention. He was not necessarily a Titan of the big screen. However, he did appear in a few historical/fantasy dramas, most notably John Boorman’s 1981 film Excalibur. I used to…
  • Quiet and Contemplative – Essentials for Writing Historical Fiction

    AdamAH
    27 Apr 2015 | 5:45 pm
    There is a truth which I have forgotten lately. With the day-to-day workings of my modern, connected life, I’ve been missing out on something essential, something that in the past has always helped me to nurture my creativity, and better my historical fiction. What is it? Quiet. Yes. That illusive modern-day grail, that has the power to slow us down, to help us think, to regroup and empower ourselves. Now that I write that, it really does seem obvious, not ground-breaking at all. But it is, and I’ve found that without taking some calm time to contemplate the past, my fiction suffers. Like…
  • The World of Children of Apollo – Part V – Etruria

    AdamAH
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:36 pm
    In the previous installment we visited Rome, the centre of the world when the Roman Empire was at its greatest extent. We will now leave that ancient city for an even more ancient landscape. What we know today as Tuscany, the central and western region of Italy, was then part of the larger central Italian kingdom of Etruria. This region plays a large role in Children of Apollo, as it is the ancestral land of Lucius Metellus Anguis’ family. For them, the family estate is a place of childhood memory, of escape, and of mystery. Their roots run deep in that ancient land. Chimera of Arezzo I…
 
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    Mapshole: Uncommon Knowledge

  • Why I Chose to Invest in Valero Energy Corporation

    Rob Rose
    15 May 2015 | 7:15 am
    First and foremost, I’ll admit that I am not a stock market expert and this post does not constitute investing advice but I’d like to explain why I’m investing in Valero Energy Corporation. Wednesday (May 13th) however I decided to liquidate my measly four shares in Tesla Motors (NASDAQ:TSLA) at the price of $243.69 and invest in 12 shares of Valero Energy Corporation (NYSE:VLO). I put all remaining cash into Schwab’s S&P 500 Index fund (MUTF:SWPPX). In doing so, I hope to have made a good mid-term value investment. I’ve detailed my reasons within this post.
  • Cyber Nations Review

    Rob Rose
    4 May 2015 | 2:20 pm
    Cyber Nations is a nation simulation game created by Kevin Marks or, as he’s known in-game, admin. The game was first released on January 6, 2006 and many of its users joined after being recruited from the older game Jennifer Government: NationState. At its height, the game had thousands of players; but Cyber Nations’ history is history you want to know about what Cyber Nations is today. I first signed up for Cyber Nations in 2012 because I liked the idea of an online nation simulator game and CN certainly meets that description. Over the past two plus years, I’ve had plenty…
  • The Food Babe Parody: Reblog From “I Fucking Don’t Understand Science”

    Rob Rose
    22 Apr 2015 | 1:20 pm
    If there’s one thing I hate, it’s a complete disregard for scientific research and tangible evidence. Due to the open nature of the Internet, the web is sure to be full of that kind of nonsense. The Food Babe is one such site that lies close to the core of the anti-science blogosphere. A parody blog I am particularly fond of, I Fucking Don’t Understand Science, took a shot at The Food Babe today that I found quite humorous. Have a look, and enjoy!Q&A: The Food Babe’s Latest Diet! | I Fucking Don’t Understand Science.
  • Algorithm Now Serving on the Board of Directors of a Hong Kong Venture Capital Firm

    Rob Rose
    13 Apr 2015 | 3:38 pm
    Weird, but inevitable: algorithm now serves on a corporate board | ZDNetWhile browsing the internet today, I caught sight of this article on ZDNet about a computer algorithm now serving on the board of directors for the Hong Kong venture capital firm Deep Knowledge Ventures. The board plans to use the algorithm known as VITAL, short for “Validating Investment Tool for Advancing Life Sciences” to help with investment decisions. For further information, check out the article linked above.
  • Removing Referral Spam from Google Analytics

    Rob Rose
    6 Apr 2015 | 7:30 am
    This post is entirely off topic from what I’m supposed to be posting, but it’s an issue that has cost me a great deal of time and I hope I can save someone else that hassle. Referral spam is a very irritating tactic that internet marketers use to drive people to visit their site. Unlike other tactics which target users of a website, referral spam attempts to target the people running the website. I’m not extremely knowledgeable in the subject, but I know enough to give a brief over view of how it works, and where you can find resources to stop it.What are referrals?Referral…
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